Mystic Bourgeoisie Books

These books (most of them anyway) were listed on the Mystic Bourgeoisie blog.

This collection contains 704 books and was last updated on 24 September 2006. It was generated (semi-)automatically by Bookpedia.

You can thank the publishers and (in some cases) reviewers for the crappy formatting and execrable spelling in many of the Summary sections -- which are pulled directly off Amazon, not written by me. I am not endorsing all these books -- not by a long shot. Some are extremely valuable resources. Some are here precisely because they're utter crap. It is left as an exercise for the reader to decide which are which.

Although this is a wholly legitimate page -- let no one say otherwise! -- all of us here at Mystic Bourgeoisie would still like to thank The Search Engines!

Author: Philip Cushman
Publisher: Addison Wesley Publishing Company
Release: 1996
Summary: A fascinating, entertaining book. I cannot recommend Cushman highly enough! It is truly disappointing that book has been overlooked by the discipline of psychology. However, the reasons it has been are obvious once you read it. Cushman details how psychology ignores its basic assumptions (e.g., about the self, the nature of understanding) and consequently perpetuates the problems it seeks to alleviate. This is a central point -- psychology is elevating a notion of self (i.e., the empty self) that is only filled by psychotherapy, not "cured". For those who are willing to reflect on how the profession is influenced by moral presuppositions, and political and economic factors - this is a must read. Moreover - Cushman offers solutions. For those who know of this book -- it is a hidden classic.

Author: Richard Dawkins
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2006
Summary: Inheriting the mantle of revolutionary biologist from Darwin, Watson, and Crick, Richard Dawkins forced an enormous change in the way we see ourselves and the world with the publication of "The Selfish Gene". Suppose, instead of thinking about organisms using genes to reproduce themselves, as we had since Mendel's work was rediscovered, we turn it around and imagine that "our" genes build and maintain us in order to make more genes. That simple reversal seems to answer many puzzlers which had stumped scientists for years, and we haven't thought of evolution in the same way since.
Why are there miles and miles of "unused" DNA within each of our bodies? Why should a bee give up its own chance to reproduce to help raise her sisters and brothers? With a prophet's clarity, Dawkins told us the answers from the perspective of molecules competing for limited space and resources to produce more of their own kind. Drawing fascinating examples from every field of biology, he paved the way for a serious re-evaluation of evolution. He also introduced the concept of self-reproducing ideas, or "memes", which (seemingly) use humans exclusively for their propagation. If we are puppets, he says, at least we can try to understand our strings. "--Rob Lightner"


Author: Terry Eagleton
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2005
Summary: Brimming with lively wit and penetrating insight, Holy Terror offers a profound and timely investigation of the idea of terror, drawing upon political, philosophical, literary, and theological sources to trace a genealogy from the ancient world to the present day.
Famed critic Terry Eagleton offers here a metaphysics of terror with a serious historical perspective. Writing with remarkable clarity and persuasiveness, Eagleton examines a concept whose cultural impact predates 9/11 by millennia. From its earliest manifestations in rite and ritual, through
its rebirth as a political idea with the French Revolution, to the 'War on Terror' of today, terror has been regarded with both horror and fascination. Eagleton examines the duality of the sacred (both life-giving and death-dealing) and relates it, via current and past ideas of freedom, to the idea
of terror itself. Stretching from the cult of Dionysus to the thought of Jacques Lacan, the book sheds light into ideas of God, freedom, the sublime, and the unconscious. It also examines the problem of evil, and devotes a concluding chapter to the idea of tragic sacrifice and the scapegoat.
Written by one of the world's foremost cultural critics, Holy Terror is a provocative and ambitious examination of one of the most urgent issues of our time.


Author: Sinead Garrigan Mattar
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2004
Summary: What is the relevance of the Irish Revival to modernism? Why did Yeats's vision of a theatre for Ireland take a ritual form? What was so incendiary about J. M. Synge's vision of the Irish peasantry? These are among the questions that Garrigan Mattar seeks to answer by exploring the primitivism
of the Irish Revival in relation to comparative science.


Author: Roger Luckhurst
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2002
Summary: The belief in telepathy is still widely held and yet it remains much disputed by scientists. Roger Luckhurst explores the origins of the term in the late nineteenth century. Telepathy mixed physical and mental sciences, new technologies and old superstitions, and it fascinated many famous
people in the late Victorian era: Sigmund Freud, Thomas Huxley, Henry James, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde. This is an exciting and accessible study, written for general readers as much as scholars and students.


Author: R. A. Fisher
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2000
Summary: This is the definitive edition of R.A. Fisher's classic work--probably the best known book in evolutionary biology after Darwin's Origin of Species. The book was the first attempt to assess and explain Darwin's evolutionary theories in terms of genetic evolution. Based on the original 1930
edition, the book incorporates the many changes Fisher made for the second edition as well as unpublished material taken from Fisher's own copy.


Author: Keith Hitchins
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1994
Summary: This latest volume in the acclaimed Oxford History of Modern Europe series looks at the collapse of Communist power which has once again focused attention on the processes of nation-building in central and eastern Europe. In this comprehensive study, Keith Hitchins focuses on how Rumania's
political and intellectual elites attempted to establish an independent state before the advent of Communist rule in 1947. It traces the efforts of the country's leaders to create the institutions of a modern state, to "Europeanize" without losing national identity, and to find ways of preserving
independence in the international political and economic order dominated by the great powers. In his study, Hitchins emphasizes how Rumania's past history is essential to a clear understanding of its complex present and future.


Author: Angelique Richardson
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2003
Summary: Love and Eugenics in the Late Nineteenth Century is a fascinating, lucid, and controversial study of the centrality of eugenic debate to the Victorians. Reappraising the operation of social and sexual power in Victorian society and fiction, it makes a radical contribution to English studies,
nineteenth-century and gender studies, and the history of science.


Author: Lorne Dawson
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1998
Summary: Long the focus of controversy, cults,--what sociologists prefer to call new religious movements--have been studied by scholars for years. Yet little of this information has made its way into public awareness. Comprehending Cults is a comprehensive and balanced overview which synthesizes and
assesses the results of thirty years of research into new religious movements by historians, sociologists, and psychologists of religion. Organized in terms of seven of the most commonly asked questions about cults (Why did they emerge? Who joins them and why? Why do some become violent?) the book
clarifies the issues at stake, seeking to replace prejudice and speculation with reliable insights into the nature of cult activity.
Comprehending Cults examines the history and theory of the development of new religious movements as well as the factors, both social and economic, which determine their success. The book explores particular issues and factions in new religious movements including discussions on Scientology and
other initiatory groups; Hare Krishna and other Indian-based religious groups; new religious movements and violence; the Unification Church; coercive conversion controversy (deprogramming); the Satanism scare; women and religious movements; and the future of religion.
Written in an easy-to-read yet detailed manner, Comprehending Cults provides an excellent introduction to the study of new religious phenomena, one equally suited to general readers, students, and scholars.


Author: Christopher Partridge
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2004
Summary: From Christian Science and the Jehovah's Witnesses to Soka Gakkai, Wicca, and Falun Gong, the last century and a half has seen an unprecedented growth of new religious movements, sects, and alternative spiritualities.
New Religions offers an authoritative and lavishly illustrated guide to more than two hundred of these wildly varied groups and movements. The volume is organized according to an entirely new method of classification, which associates movements, sects, and spiritualities with the religious
traditions from which they arose. Rastafarianism, for example, is shown to have its roots in Christianity, while Bahai is an offshoot of Islam. Included are both long-established groups like the Seventh-Day Adventists and the Hutterites and more recent movements like Santeria, the Unification
Church, and ISKCON (the "Hare Krishnas"). In addition to Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Zoroastrianism, Indian Religions, and the Religions of East Asia, sections are devoted to movements and groups inspired by Indigenous and Pagan Traditions, and by Western Esoteric and New Age Traditions.
Particularly fascinating is the discussion of the religious offspring of Modern Western Culture, including Scientology, UFO-based groups (such as the Raelians), and even the worship of celebrities like Elvis and Princess Diana. Each entry clearly and concisely explains the history, beliefs and
practices, and status in the world today of the movement or group in question. Special entries highlight broad topics such as New Religions in China as well as intriguing subjects such as Cargo Cults, Martial Arts, Astrology, and Feng Shui.
Written by specialists, New Religions is a fascinating and colorful guide to the bewildering array of religious and spiritual options available to the modern seeker.


Author: Kevin Starr
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2003
Summary: The sixth volume in one of the great ongoing works of American cultural history--Kevin Starr's monumental Americans and the California Dream--Embattled Dreams is a peerless work of cultural history following California in the years surrounding World War II.
During the 1940s California ascended to a new, more powerful role in the nation. Starr describes the vast expansion of the war industry and California's role as the "arsenal of democracy" (especially the significant part women played in the aviation industry). He examines the politics of the
state: Earl Warren as the dominant political figure, the anti-Communist movement and "red baiting," and the early career of Richard Nixon. He also looks at culture, ranging from Hollywood to the counterculture, to film noir and detective stories. And he illuminates the harassment of Japanese
immigrants and the shameful treatment of other minorities, especially Hispanics and blacks.
In Embattled Dreams, Starr again provides a spellbinding account of the Golden State, narrating California's transformation from a regional power to a dominant economic, social, and cultural force.
"With a novelist's eye for the telling detail, and a historian's grasp of the sweep of grand events.... [Starr's] got it all down.... I read the book with absorbed admiration."--Herman Wouk, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Caine Mutiny and The Winds of War
"The scope of Starr's scholarship is breathtaking."--Atlantic Monthly
"A magnificent accomplishment."--Los Angeles Times Book Review
"Brilliant and epic social and cultural history."--Business Week
"Ebullient, nuanced, interdisciplinary history of the grandest kind."--San Francisco Chronicle


Author: Christopher Peterson, Martin Seligman
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2004
Summary: "Character" has become a front-and-center topic in contemporary discourse, but this term does not have a fixed meaning. Character may be simply defined by what someone does not do, but a more active and thorough definition is necessary, one that addresses certain vital questions. Is character
a singular characteristic of an individual, or is it composed of different aspects? Does character--however we define it--exist in degrees, or is it simply something one happens to have? How can character be developed? Can it be learned? Relatedly, can it be taught, and who might be the most
effective teacher? What roles are played by family, schools, the media, religion, and the larger culture? This groundbreaking handbook of character strengths and virtues is the first progress report from a prestigious group of researchers who have undertaken the systematic classification and
measurement of widely valued positive traits. They approach good character in terms of separate strengths-authenticity, persistence, kindness, gratitude, hope, humor, and so on-each of which exists in degrees.

Character Strengths and Virtues classifies twenty-four specific strengths under six broad virtues that consistently emerge across history and culture: wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance, and transcendence. Each strength is thoroughly examined in its own chapter, with special attention to
its meaning, explanation, measurement, causes, correlates, consequences, and development across the life span, as well as to strategies for its deliberate cultivation. This book demands the attention of anyone interested in psychology and what it can teach about the good life.


Author: Jonathan Petropoulos
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2006
Summary: The link between Hitler's Third Reich and European royalty has gone largely unexplored due to the secrecy surrounding royal families. Now, in Royals and the Reich, Jonathan Petropoulos uses unprecedented access to royal archives to tell the fascinating story of the Princes of Hesse and the
important role they played in the Nazi regime.
Princes Philipp and Christoph von Hessen-Kassel, great-grandsons of Queen Victoria of England, had been humiliated by defeat in WWI and, like much of the German aristocracy, feared the social unrest wrought by the ineffectual Weimar Republic. Petropoulos shows how the princes, lured by prominent
positions in the Nazi regime and highly susceptible to nationalist appeals, became enthusiastic supporters of Hitler. Prince Philipp, son-in-law to the King of Italy, became the highest-ranking prince in the Nazi state and developed a close personal relationship with Hitler and Hermann Goring.
Prince Christoph was a prominent SS officer and head of one of the most important intelligence agencies in the Third Reich. In return, the princes made the Nazis socially acceptable to wealthy, high-society patrons. Prince Philipp even introduced Goring to Mussolini at a critical stage in the Nazi
Party's development and later served as a liaison between Hitler and the Italian dictator.
Permitted access to Hessen family private papers and the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle, Petropoulos follows the story of the House of Hesse through to its tragic denouement--the princes' betrayal and persecution by an increasingly paranoid Hitler and prosecution and denazification by the
Allies. Royals and the Reich is a startling and unique portrait of the vanished world of prewar aristocrats and a royal family caught in one of the most tumultuous periods in history.


Author: Philip Jenkins
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2004
Summary: In books such as Mystics and Messiahs, Hidden Gospels, and The Next Christendom, Philip Jenkins has established himself as a leading commentator on religion and society. Now, in Dream Catchers, Jenkins offers a brilliant account of the changing mainstream attitudes towards Native American
spirituality, once seen as degraded spectacle, now hailed as New Age salvation.
While early Americans had nothing but contempt for Indian religions, deploring them as loathsome devil worship and snake dancing, white Americans today respect and admire Native spirituality. In this book, Jenkins charts this remarkable change, highlighting the complex history of white
American attitudes towards Native religions from colonial times to the present. Jenkins ranges widely, considering everything from the 19th-century American obsession with "Hebrew Indians" and Lost Tribes, to the early 20th-century cult of the Maya as bearers of the wisdom of ancient Atlantis, to
films like Pocahontas and Dances With Wolves. He looks at the popularity of the Carlos Castaneda books, the writings of Lynn Andrews, and the influential works of Frank Waters, and he explores the New Age paraphernalia found in places like Sedona, Arizona, including dream-catchers, crystals,
medicine bags, and Native-themed Tarot cards. Jenkins examines the controversial New Age appropriation of Native sacred places; notes that many "white Indians" see mainstream society as religiously empty; and asks why a government founded on religious freedom tried to eradicate native religions in
the last century--and what this says about how we define religion.
An engrossing account of our changing attitudes towards Native spirituality, Dream Catchers offers a fascinating introduction to one of the more interesting aspects of contemporary American religion.


Author: Kevin Starr
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2002
Summary: The late 1930s and early 1940s introduced to California culture some of the features that still characterize it today, at least in the view of outsiders to the Golden State: surfing, drive-in movie theaters, barbecues, motels, polo shirts, and recreational vehicles. The period brought equally enduring but less superficial changes, too: advances and setbacks alike in race relations, resource management, urban development, and transportation. Kevin Starr continues his multivolume history of California with this deeply learned, always fascinating account of California at the dawn of the modern age, with a cast of characters ranging from the Native American hermit Fig Tree John to violinist Yehudi Menuhin and hardboiled-fiction master Raymond Chandler.

Author: Mark Sedgwick
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2004
Summary: The first history of Traditionalism, an important yet surprisingly little-known twentieth-century anti-modern movement. Comprising a number of often secret but sometimes very influential religious groups in the West and in the Islamic world, it affected mainstream and radical politics in
Europe and the development of the field of religious studies in the United States.
In the nineteenth century, at a time when progressive intellectuals had lost faith in Christianity's ability to deliver religious and spiritual truth, the West discovered non-Western religious writings. From these beginnings grew Traditionalism, emerging from the occultist milieu of late
nineteenth-century France, and fed by the widespread loss of faith in progress that followed the First World War. Working first in Paris and then in Cairo, the French writer Rene Guenon rejected modernity as a dark age, and sought to reconstruct the Perennial Philosophy-- the central religious
truths behind all the major world religions --largely on the basis of his reading of Hindu religious texts.
A number of disenchanted intellectuals responded to Guenon's call with attempts to put theory into practice. Some attempted without success to guide Fascism and Nazism along Traditionalist lines; others later participated in political terror in Italy. Traditionalism finally provided the
ideological cement for the alliance of anti-democratic forces in post-Soviet Russia, and at the end of the twentieth century began to enter the debate in the Islamic world about the desirable relationship between Islam and modernity


Author: Robert Jean Campbell
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2003
Summary: The eighth edition of Campbell's Psychiatric Dictionary continues to pursure its goal of keeping the reader abreast of new development in psychiatry.

Author: Jonathan Freedman
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2002
Summary: From the beginning of modern intellectual history to the culture wars of the present day, the experience of assimilating Jews and the idiom of "culture" have been fundamentally intertwined with each other. Freedman's book begins by looking at images of the stereotypical Jew in the literary
culture of nineteenth- and twentieth-century England and America, and then considers the efforts on the part of Jewish critics and intellectuals to counter this image in the public sphere. It explores the unexpected parallels and ironic reversals between a cultural dispensation that had ambivalent
responses to Jews and Jews who became exponents of that very tradition.


Author: Stefan Kuhl
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2002
Summary: When Hitler published Mein Kampf in 1924, he held up a foreign law as a model for his program of racial purification: The U.S. Immigration Restriction Act of 1924, which prohibited the immigration of those with hereditary illnesses and entire ethnic groups. When the Nazis took power in 1933,
they installed a program of eugenics--the attempted "improvement" of the population through forced sterilization and marriage controls--that consciously drew on the U.S. example. By then, many American states had long had compulsory sterilization laws for "defectives," upheld by the Supreme Court
in 1927. Small wonder that the Nazi laws led one eugenics activist in Virginia to complain, "The Germans are beating us at our own game."
In The Nazi Connection, Stefan Kuhl uncovers the ties between the American eugenics movement and the Nazi program of racial hygiene, showing that many American scientists actively supported Hitler's policies. After introducing us to the recently resurgent problem of scientific racism, Kuhl
carefully recounts the history of the eugenics movement, both in the United States and internationally, demonstrating how widely the idea of sterilization as a genetic control had become accepted by the early twentieth century. From the first, the American eugenicists led the way with radical
ideas. Their influence led to sterilization laws in dozens of states--laws which were studied, and praised, by the German racial hygienists. With the rise of Hitler, the Germans enacted compulsory sterilization laws partly based on the U.S. experience, and American eugenists took pride in their
influence on Nazi policies. Kuhl recreates astonishing scenes of American eugenicists travelling to Germany to study the new laws, publishing scholarly articles lionizing the Nazi eugenics program, and proudly comparing personal notes from Hitler thanking them for their books. Even after the
outbreak of war, he writes, the American eugenicists frowned upon Hitler's totalitarian government, but not his sterilization laws. So deep was the failure to recognize the connection between eugenics and Hitler's genocidal policies, that a prominent liberal Jewish eugenicist who had been forced to
flee Germany found it fit to grumble that the Nazis "took over our entire plan of eugenic measures."
By 1945, when the murderous nature of the Nazi government was made perfectly clear, the American eugenicists sought to downplay the close connections between themselves and the German program. Some of them, in fact, had sought to distance themselves from Hitler even before the war. But
Stefan Kuhl's deeply documented book provides a devastating indictment of the influence--and aid--provided by American scientists for the most comprehensive attempt to enforce racial purity in world history.


Author: Robert C. Fuller
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2001
Summary: Nearly 40% of all Americans have no connection with organized religion. Yet many of these people, even though they might never step inside a house of worship, live profoundly spiritual lives. But what is the nature and value of unchurched spirituality in America? Is it a recent phenomenon, a
New Age fad that will soon fade, or a long-standing and essential aspect of the American experience?
In Spiritual But Not Religious, Robert Fuller offers fascinating answers to these questions. He shows that alternative spiritual practices have a long and rich history in America, dating back to the colonial period, when church membership rarely exceeded 17% and interest in astrology,
numerology, magic, and witchcraft ran high. Fuller traces such unchurched traditions into the mid-nineteenth century, when Americans responded enthusiastically to new philosophies such as Swedenborgianism, Transcendentalism, and mesmerism, right up to the current interest in meditation, channeling,
divination, and a host of other unconventional spiritual practices. Throughout, Fuller argues that far from the flighty and narcissistic dilettantes they are often made out to be, unchurched spiritual seekers embrace a mature and dynamic set of basic beliefs. They focus on inner sources of
spirituality and on this world rather than the afterlife; they believe in the accessibility of God and in the mind's untapped powers; they see a fundamental unity between science and religion and an equality between genders and races; and they are more willing to test their beliefs and change them
when they prove untenable.
Timely, sweeping in its scope, and informed by a clear historical understanding, Spiritual But Not Religious offers fresh perspective on the growing numbers of Americans who find their spirituality outside the church.


Author: Karma-Glin-Pa, Donald S. Lopez Jr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2000
Summary: The Tibetan Book of the Dead is one of the texts that, according to legend, Padma-Sambhava was compelled to hide during his visit to Tibet in the late 8th century. The guru hid his books in stones, lakes, and pillars because the Tibetans of that day and age were somehow unprepared for their
teachings. Now, in the form of the ever-popular Tibetan Book of the Dead, these teachings are constantly being discovered and rediscovered by Western readers of many different backgrounds--a phenomenon which began in 1927 with Oxford's first edition of Dr. Evans-Wentz's landmark volume. While it is
traditionally used as a mortuary text, to be read or recited in the presence of a dead or dying person, this book--which relates the whole experience of death and rebirth in three intermediate states of being--was originally understood as a guide not only for the dead but also for the living. As a
contribution to the science of death and dying--not to mention the belief in life after death, or the belief in rebirth--The Tibetan Book of the Dead is unique among the sacred texts of the world, for its socio-cultural influence in this regard is without comparison.

This fourth edition features a new foreword, afterword, and suggested further reading list by Donald S. Lopez, author of Prisoners of Shangri-La: Tibetan Buddhism and the West. Lopez traces the whole history of the late Evans-Wentz's three earlier editions of this book, fully considering the work of
contributors to previous editions (C. G. Jung among them), the sections that were added by Evans-Wentz along the way, the questions surrounding the book's translation, and finally the volume's profound importance in engendering both popular and academic interest in the religion and culture of Tibet.
Another key theme that Lopez addresses is the changing nature of this book's audience--from the prewar theosophists to the beat poets to the hippies to contemporary exponents of the hospice movement--and what these audiences have found (or sought) in its very old pages.


Author: Joel Myerson
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 2000
Summary: The transcendentalist movement is generally recognized to be the first major watershed in American literary and intellectual history. Pioneered by Emerson, Thoreau, Orestes Brownson, Margaret Fuller, and Bronson Alcott (among others), Transcendentalism provided a springboard for the first
distinctly American forays into intellectual culture: religion and religious reform, philosophy, literature, ecology, and spiritualism. This new collection, edited by eminent American literature scholar Joel Myerson, is the first anthology of the period to appear in over fifty years.
Transcendentalism: A Reader draws together in their entirety the essential writings of the Transcendentalist group during its most active period, 1836-1844. It includes the major publications of the Dial, the writings on democratic and social reform, the early poetry, nature writings, and all of
Emerson's major essays, as well as an informative introduction and annotations by Myerson.


Author: Kevin Starr
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1997
Summary: The Great Depression struck California hard, just as it did countless other states and nations. It also helped remake California, writes Kevin Starr in this fourth installment of his multivolume history of the state. The Depression brought a massive influx of hopeful refugees to California from elsewhere in the United States, including 300,000 new agricultural workers--the people of John Steinbeck's "Grapes of Wrath". These newcomers worked in the fields and stores for fifteen cents an hour while Hollywood made movies about their lot, Woody Guthrie sang songs about them, and union organizers tried hard to make a labor-based revolution. The fortunes of these "Okies" is just one of the sweeping topics that Starr, a fine writer and imaginative chronicler, takes on in this book.

Author: Thomas F. Gossett
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1997
Summary: When Thomas Gossett's Race: The History of an Idea in America appeared in 1963, it explored the impact of race theory on American letters in a way that anticipated the investigation of race and culture being conducted today. Bold, rigorous, and broad in scope, Gossett's book quickly
established itself as a critical resource to younger scholars seeking a candid, theoretically sophisticated treatment of race in American cultural history.

Here, reprinted without change, is Gossett's classic study, making available to a new generation of scholars a lucid, accessibly written volume that ranges from colonial race theory and its European antecedents, through eighteenth- and nineteenth- century race pseudoscience, to the racialist
dimension of American thought and literature emerging against backgrounds such as Anglo- Saxonism, westward expansion, Social Darwinism, xenophobia, World War I, and modern racial theory.

Featuring a new afterword by the author, an introduction by series editors Shelley Fisher Fishkin and Arnold Rampersad, and a bibliographic essay by Maghan Keita, this indispensable book, whose first edition helped change the way scholars discussed race, will richly reward scholars of American
Studies, American Literature, and African-American Studies.


Author: David E. Stannard
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1993
Summary: For four hundred years--from the first Spanish assaults against the Arawak people of Hispaniola in the 1490s to the U.S. Army's massacre of Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in the 1890s--the indigenous inhabitants of North and South America endured an unending firestorm of violence. During that
time the native population of the Western Hemisphere declined by as many as 100 million people. Indeed, as historian David E. Stannard argues in this stunning new book, the European and white American destruction of the native peoples of the Americas was the most massive act of genocide in the
history of the world.
Stannard begins with a portrait of the enormous richness and diversity of life in the Americas prior to Columbus's fateful voyage in 1492. He then follows the path of genocide from the Indies to Mexico and Central and South America, then north to Florida, Virginia, and New England, and finally
out across the Great Plains and Southwest to California and the North Pacific Coast. Stannard reveals that wherever Europeans or white Americans went, the native people were caught between imported plagues and barbarous atrocities, typically resulting in the annihilation of 95 percent of their
populations. What kind of people, he asks, do such horrendous things to others? His highly provocative answer: Christians. Digging deeply into ancient European and Christian attitudes toward sex, race, and war, he finds the cultural ground well prepared by the end of the Middle Ages for the
centuries-long genocide campaign that Europeans and their descendants launched--and in places continue to wage--against the New World's original inhabitants. Advancing a thesis that is sure to create much controversy, Stannard contends that the perpetrators of the American Holocaust drew on the same
ideological wellspring as did the later architects of the Nazi Holocaust. It is an ideology that remains dangerously alive today, he adds, and one that in recent years has surfaced in American justifications for large-scale military intervention in Southeast Asia and the Middle East.
At once sweeping in scope and meticulously detailed, American Holocaust is a work of impassioned scholarship that is certain to ignite intense historical and moral debate.


Author: Henry Louis Gates
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1993
Summary: Multiculturalism. It has been the subject of cover stories in Time and Newsweek, as well as numerous articles in newspapers and magazines around America. It has sparked heated jeremiads by George Will, Dinesh D'Sousa, and Roger Kimball. It moved William F. Buckley to rail against Stanley Fish
and Catherine Stimpson on "Firing Line." It is arguably the most hotly debated topic in America today--and justly so. For whether one speaks of tensions between Hasidim and African-Americans in Crown Heights, or violent mass protests against Moscow in ethnic republics such as Armenia, or outright
war between Serbs and Bosnians in the former Yugoslavia, it is clear that the clash of cultures is a worldwide problem, deeply felt, passionately expressed, always on the verge of violent explosion. Problems of this magnitude inevitably frame the discussion of "multiculturalism" and "cultural
diversity" in the American classroom as well.
In Loose Canons, one of America's leading literary and cultural critics, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., offers a broad, illuminating look at this highly contentious issue. Gates agrees that our world is deeply divided by nationalism, racism, and sexism, and argues that the only way to transcend
these divisions--to forge a civic culture that respects both differences and similarities--is through education that respects both the diversity and commonalities of human culture. His is a plea for cultural and intercultural understanding. (You can't understand the world, he observes, if you
exclude 90 percent of the world's cultural heritage.) We feel his ideas most strongly voiced in the concluding essay in the volume, "Trading on the Margin." Avoiding the stridency of both the Right and the Left, Gates concludes that the society we have made simply won't survive without the values of
tolerance, and cultural tolerance comes to nothing without cultural understanding.
Henry Louis Gates is one of the most visible and outspoken figures on the academic scene, the subject of a cover story in The New York Times Sunday Magazine and a major profile in The Boston Globe, and a much sought-after commentator. And as one of America's foremost advocates of
African-American Studies (he is head of the department at Harvard), he has reflected upon the varied meanings of multiculturalism throughout his professional career, long before it became a national controversy. What we find in these pages, then, is the fruit of years of reflection on culture,
racism, and the "American identity," and a deep commitment to broadening the literary and cultural horizons of all Americans.


Author: Ian K. Steele
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1995
Summary: In 1513, only a few years before Cortes conquered the Aztec empire, Juan Ponce de Leon and three shiploads of conquistadores landed just south of what is now St. Augustine, Florida. The Spanish adventurers, however, were quickly driven away by the Timucua people; further landings were
similarly defeated by the extraordinary archers of the Calusa, who ultimately took the lives of Hernandez de Cordoba and Ponce de Leon himself. Clearly, the European experience in North America would be a far cry from their swift victories over the Aztecs and Incas.
A panoramic history of the numerous European invasions of North America, this book paints a dramatic new portrait of the centuries of warfare that shook the continent. From the defeat of Ponce de Leon in 1513 to a negotiated peace with the British in 1765, Steele's fascinating account destroys
the old image of technologically advanced Europeans overrunning primitive savages, and reveals how Amerindians rose to the challenge of each successive invasion with martial and diplomatic skill. In war after war, the Amerindians and Europeans battled in a precarious balance, adapting each other's
technology and tactics and seeking each other out as allies and supply sources for food and weapons. Steele follows the experience of the Spanish at San Agustin, the English at Jamestown and Plymouth, the French at Quebec, and the Dutch at Albany, revealing the vast range of Amerindian strategies
for coping with the invaders.
The conflicts that erupted with the European arrival have long been distorted by myth and self-congratulatory folklore. Warpaths offers students of American history and Native American studies a startling new look at this pivotal era, combining social, cultural, and military history to provide
a more nuanced portrait of the violence that gave birth to modern North America.


Author: Christopher Peterson, Steven F. Maier, Martin E. P. Seligman
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1995
Summary: When experience with uncontrollable events gives rise to the expectation that events in the future will also elude control, disruptions in motivation, emotion, and learning may ensue. "Learned helplessness" refers to the problems that arise in the wake of uncontrollability. First described
in the 1960s among laboratory animals, learned helplessness has since been applied to a variety of human problems entailing inappropriate passivity and demoralization. While learned helplessness is best known as an explanation of depression, studies with both people and animals have mapped out the
cognitive and biological aspects. The present volume, written by some of the most widely recognized leaders in the field, summarizes and integrates the theory, research, and application of learned helplessness. Each line of work is evaluated critically in terms of what is and is not known, and
future directions are sketched. More generally, psychiatrists and psychologists in various specialties will be interested in the book's argument that a theory emphasizing personal control is of particular interest in the here and now, as individuality and control are such salient cultural
topics.


Author: Kevin Starr
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1986
Summary: California seems to have been the source of almost every cultural trend that defines modern America--often in contradictory ways. Consider the waves of conservative and progressive politics, self-love and selflessness, sushi and Big Macs, great literature, and banal films. "Inventing the Dream" traces this extraordinary state through the early years of the 20th century, when Americans began to flock westward and Los Angeles grew from a town of 50,000 to a large city of 320,000 in justa couple of decades. By 1926, Starr writes, Hollywood was the United States' fifth-largest industry, grossing $1.5 billion a year and accounting for 90 percent of the world's films--and, of course, changing the values of whole cultures. This is a fine work of historical reconstruction, joining Starr's other well-regarded works of Californiana.

Author: Kevin Starr
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1986
Summary: Part Two Of Two Parts
The emergence of California as a regional civilization in the late nineteenth century was far more than a dramatic and colorful chapter in American history. Probing the inner experience of California's formative years, Starr blends fact and historical vision with striking metaphor to re-create the nature of the California dream and reveal its significance as a social, psychological and symbolic enterprise. Commemorative in approach, this totally engaging work shows how the land and the people interacted to form a distinct and fascinating culture. While dramatizing the debate over what California was and what it should be, Starr also exposes the fallacies and contradictions inherent in the dream itself. All the ferment of the state's history is presented here as the citizens themselves lived through it.


Author: David F. Noble
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1986
Summary: Focusing on the postwar automation of the American metal-working industry--the heart of the modern industrial economy--this is a provocative study of how automation has assumed a critical role in America. David Noble argues that industrial automation--more than merely a technological
advance--is a social process that reflects very real divisions and pressures within our society. The book explains how technology is often spurred and shaped by the military, corporations, universities, and other mighty institutions. Using detailed case studies, Noble also demonstrates how
engineering design is influenced by political, economic, and sociological considerations, and how the deployment of equipment is frequently entangled with certain managerial concerns.


Author: Max Weber, H.H. Gerth, C. Wright Mills
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1958
Summary: Introducing the student to the work of a great sociologist, this book opens with a comprehensive biographical essay on Weber's life and work and includes his essays on science and politics, power, religion, and social structures.

Author:
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1999
Summary: Crossley-Holland--the widely acclaimed translator of Old English texts--introduces the Anglo-Saxons through their chronicles, laws, letters, charters, and poetry, with many of the greatest surviving poems printed in their entirety.

Author: George Du Maurier, Dennis Denisoff
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1999
Summary: First published in 1894, the story of the diva Trilby O'Ferrall and her mentor, Svengali, has entered the mythology of that period alongside Dracula and Sherlock Holmes. Immensely popular for years, the novel led to a hit play, a series of popular films, Trilby products from hats to
ice-cream, and streets in Florida named after characters in the book. The setting reflects Du Maurier's bohemian years as an art student in Paris before he went to London to make a career in journalism. A celebrated caricaturist for Punch magazine, Du Maurier's drawings for the novel--of which his
most significant are included here--form a large part of its appeal.


Author: Tacitus
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
Release: 1999
Summary: Cornelius Tacitus, Rome's greatest historian and the last great writer of classical Latin prose, produced his first two books in AD 98, after the assination of the Emperor Domitian ended fifteen years of enforced silence. Much of Agricola, which is the biography of Tacitus' late father-in-law
Julius Agricola, is devoted to Britain and its people, since Agricola's claim to fame was that as governor for seven years he had completed the conquest of Britain, begun four decades earlier. Germany provides an account of Rome's most dangerous enemies, the Germans, and is the only surviving
example of an ethnographic study from the ancient world. Each book in its way has had immense influence on our perception of Rome and the northern barbarians. This edition reflects recent research in Roman-British and Roman-German history and includes newly discovered evidence on Tacitus' early
career.


Author: Hannah Arendt
Publisher: Harvest Books
Release: 1973
Summary: Generally regarded as the definitive work on totalitarianism, this book is an essential component of any study of twentieth-century political movements. Arendt was one of the first to recognize that Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union were two sides of the same coin rather than opposing philosophies of Right and Left. “With the Origins of Totalitarianism Hannah Arendt emerges as the most original and profound-therefore the most valuable-political theoretician of our times” (New Leader). Index.


Author: C. G. Jung
Publisher: Harvest/HBJ Book
Release: 1955
Summary: A very insightful and meaningful book, 11 intriguing essays in 244 pages. Jung is a deeper thinker, and I think not reductive like Freud and Adler tended to be. He makes no claim to dogmatism or absolutes. Jung really hits on the psyche and transcends the borders of rational intelligence into areas of the unconscious expressions in symbolism and images.

I am going to argue against another reviewer here that gave this book 4 stars as being outdated. When I look at the present collective societal structure and current cultural pattern apart from the minority of advanced individuals, I can see the postmodern man has regressed far from the modern man of the 1930's in search of a soul. Of course there as been advances individually, but on a collective level; fundamentalism, religious literalism, nationalism, patriotism and one-sided thinking This has grown in major proportions as opposed to the other way around and it is far more serious than most even realize and patterns after historical events of very similiar nature.

The first essay on dream-analysis hits on the idea that dreams are very hard to interpret and suggests that understanding the circumstances and conditions of the conscious life is significant in relation to the dreams of the unconscious life.

On the problems of psychotherapy, Jung relates four stages of analytical psychology, the confessional, explanation, education and transformation

"The great decisions of human life have as a rule far more to do with the instincts and other mysterious unconscious factors than with conscious will and well-meaning reasonableness. The shoe that fits one person pinches another; there is no recipe for living that suits all cases. Each of us carries his own life-form - an indeterminable form which cannot be superseded by any other." p. 61

The essay on the personality types is short, non-exhaustive and briefly relates Jung's ideas of the introvert, the extrovert and the 4 basic types consisting of those persons who are thinkers, feelers, sensory and intuitive.

In his essay on the stages of life, Jung ventures beyond childhood into early adulthood and the expansion of the self into sexual desires and masculine and feminine traits and how after somewhere in the 40's there begins a contraction of the self where men may acquire more feminine traits and women more masculine. In the second half of life less is needed to educate his conscious will but more aim towards the inner being, until old age where one leaves the rational self and retreats into the psyche as children yet in a different sense.

Jung acknowledges the validity of Freud and Adler and their valuable contributions, yet Jung sees Freud's sexual reduction to all neurosis as limiting, as well as Adler's will to power over inferiority as the sole cause. Both views have proven themselves as valid in many cases, yet Jung finds there is far much more levels in what he calls "value intensities," which underlie many complexes.

Jung also briefly goes into the archaic man's interpretation of all chance events having external meanings and causes, or as causal occurrences and the contrast of the modern man's ability to see the majority of chance and unexplainable events as the human imagination, as the perception of the human. Also the same ability of assumptions in the archaic man, can be seen in the modern who uses science as the foundation over the supernatural.

Jung's essay on psychology and literature is my favorite essay. It hits on something I both think of and am affected by almost every day. I found this entirely meaningful and very much profound. In this he writes of two types of writers; those that explain all they write of and those that have visions where their writing is obscure and needs the psychologist to read into. It is those visionaries that are the most inspiring. Here there exists those as in The Shepherd of Hermas, in Dante, in the second part of Faust, in Nietzsche's Dionysian exuberance, in Wagner's Nihelungenriing, in Spitteler's Olympischer Fruhling, in the poetry of William Blake, in the lpnerotomachia of the monk Francesco Colonna, and in Jacob Boehme's philosophic and poetic stammerings.

Jung speaks of the human intuition that points to things that are unknown and hidden, and by our very nature are secret and that throughout human history this unfathomable primordial source of creative experience been expressed in images, as in the sun-wheel, in attempting to point to this. The artist and poet will resort to mythology and images which only appear to occur in dreams, cases of insanity, narcotic states and eclipses of consciousness.

"A great work of art is like a dream; for all its apparent obviousness it does not explain itself and is never unequivocal. A dream never says; "you ought," or "this is the truth." It presents an image in much the same way as nature allows a plant to grow, and we must draw our own conclusions." p. 171

I really can't even begin to touch on all the vital, significant and soul inspiring information that is loaded in the pages of this book and I think as I try I am taking away from what's written far better than what I'll ever write. I recommend this book.


Author: Laurens Van Der Post
Publisher: Harvest Books
Release: 1977
Summary: An account of the author’s grueling, but ultimately successful, journey in 1957, through Africa’s remote, primitive Kalahari Desert, in search of the legendary Bushmen, the hunters who pray to the great hunters in the sky.


Author: Virginia Woolf, Anne Oliver Bell
Publisher: Harcourt
Release: 1979
Summary: "The Diary of Virginia Woolf, Volume One: 1915-1919" was truly magnificent. I never was so interested in every day, mundane goings-on as I was while reading this diary. As a journal keeper, I was in awe over the way she expressed her thoughts and explained her day(s). I've never read anything by her, but in reading this has really sparked my interest. Editor Oliver Bell put much time and hard work into this book, but I found the footnotes on the bottom of the pages bothersome, and it took me a while to get used to them being there. If you're interested in Virginia Woolf, then read her diary. I recommend.

Author: Haynes Johnson
Publisher: Harcourt
Release: 2005
Summary: For five long years in the 1950s, Senator Joseph McCarthy and his anti-Communist crusade dominated the American scene, terrified politicians, and destroyed the lives of thousands of our citizens. In this masterful history, Haynes Johnson re-creates that time of crisis-of President Eisenhower, who hated McCarthy but would not attack him; of the Republican senators who cynically used McCarthy to win their own elections; of Edward R. Murrow, whose courageous TV broadcast began McCarthy's downfall; and of mild-mannered lawyer Joseph Welch, who finally shamed McCarthy into silence.

Johnson tells this monumental story through the lens of its relevance to our own time, when fear again affects American behavior and attitudes, for he believes now, as then, that our civil liberties, our Constitution, and our nation are at stake as we confront the ever more difficult task of balancing the need for national security with that of personal liberty.

Compelling narrative history, insightful political commentary, and intimate personal remembrance combine to make The Age of Anxiety a vitally important book for our time.

"Extremism-and the suspicion and hatred it engenders-may be Joe McCarthy's most lasting legacy . . . For these and other reasons, while McCarthy and the leading players of his time- Truman and Acheson, Eisenhower and Nixon, the Kennedy brothers and LBJ, Cohn and Schine, Stalin and Mao-have long since passed from the scene, McCarthyism remains a story without an end". -f rom the book.


Author: Robert Greenfield
Publisher: Harcourt
Release: 2006
Summary: To a generation in full revolt against any form of authority, "Tune in, turn on, drop out" became a mantra, and its popularizer, Dr. Timothy Leary, a guru. A charismatic and brilliant psychologist, Leary became first intrigued and then obsessed by the effects of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s while teaching at Harvard, where he not only encouraged but instituted their experimental use among students and faculty. What began as research into human consciousness turned into a mission to alter consciousness itself. Leary transformed himself from serious social scientist into counterculture shaman, embodying the idealism and the hedonism of an age of revolutionary change.

Timothy Leary is the first major biography of one of the most controversial figures in postwar America.


Author: Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 2005
Summary: Complex, ambitious, disquieting, and ultimately hopeful, "Multitude" is the work of a couple of writers and thinkers who dare to address the great issues of our time from a truly alternative perspective. The sequel to 2001's equally bold and demanding "Empire" continues in the vein of the earlier tome. Where "Empire"'s central premise was that the time of nation-state power grabs was passing as a new global order made up of "a new form of sovereignty" consisting of corporations, global-wide institutions, and other command centers is in ascendancy, "Multitude" focuses on the masses within the empire, except that, where academics Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri are concerned, this body is defined by its diversity rather than its commonalities. The challenge for the multitude in this new era is "for the social multiplicity to manage to communicate and act in common while remaining internally different." One may already be rereading that last sentence. Indeed, "Empire" isn't breezy reading. But for those aren't afraid of wadding into a knotty philosophical and political discourse of uncommon breadth, "Multitude" offers many rewards. "--Steven Stolder"

Author: Richard J. Evans
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 2005
Summary: There is no story in twentieth-century history more important to understand than Hitler's rise to power and the collapse of civilization in Nazi Germany. With The Coming of the Third Reich, Richard Evans, one of the world's most distinguished historians, has written the definitive account for our time. A masterful synthesis of a vast body of scholarly work integrated with important new research and interpretations, Evans's history restores drama and contingency to the rise to power of Hitler and the Nazis, even as it shows how ready Germany was by the early 1930s for such a takeover to occur. "The Coming of the Third Reich" is a masterwork of the historian's art and the book by which all others on the subject will be judged.

Author: Sigmund Freud
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Release: 2003
Summary: Freud was fascinated by the mysteries of creativity and the imagination. The groundbreaking works that comprise "The Uncanny" present some of his most influential explorations of the mind. In these pieces Freud investigates the vivid but seemingly trivial childhood memories that often "screen" deeply uncomfortable desires; the links between literature and daydreaming; and our intensely mixed feelings about things we experience as "uncanny." Also included is Freud's celebrated study of Leonardo Da Vinci-his first exercise in psychobiography.

Author: Armand Marie Leroi
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 2005
Summary: Stepping effortlessly from myth to cutting-edge science, "Mutants" gives a brilliant narrative account of our genetic code and the captivating people whose bodies have revealed it—a French convent girl who found herself changing sex at puberty; children who, echoing Homer's Cyclops, are born with a single eye in the middle of their foreheads; a village of long-lived Croatian dwarves; one family, whose bodies were entirely covered with hair, was kept at the Burmese royal court for four generations and gave Darwin one of his keenest insights into heredity. This elegant, humane, and engaging book “captures what we know of the development of what makes us human” ("Nature").

Author: Adam Zamoyski
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 2001
Summary: In "Holy Madness", Adam Zamoyski has written a history of revolutions, and of the romantic and sometimes ridiculous revolutionaries who inspired them. But because revolution was so ubiquitous an activity in the 19th century, what he has actually produced is a comprehensive account of Western civilization from 1776 to 1871. Inspired by the American Revolution (1776) and the French Revolution (1789), the whole of Europe, and large portions of the rest of the world, was regularly convulsed by the urge to fashion Utopia on Earth. Zamoyski manages to flesh out these events with well-chosen detail and a fine sense of the touching comic-heroics they often entailed, as well as the bloodletting and the horror. As a historian of Poland, Zamoyski untangles the many uprisings in Eastern Europe with particular aplomb, but his account of France is also adept, with a vivid portrayal of the idealism of the Paris Commune, overthrown in 1871.
"Holy Madness" advances a particular argument: that the century of revolutionary upheaval was the direct result of the waning of religion as a universal human-value system. Post-Enlightenment men and women turned to the ecstasies of patriotism and revolution to fill the void left by belief in God, hoping to construct a paradise on Earth rather than wait for one in heaven. According to this thesis, revolution was a new theology: "The theology may have been shaky, but the new religion did have a god. That god was the sovereign nation, whose service was the highest calling, as countless revolutionary catechisms pointed out." It's an ingenious line, worked through thoroughly, although it doesn't explain everything--for instance, why Britain was almost entirely free of revolutionary upset during the same period. But this is thought-provoking and well-made historical writing. "--Adam Roberts, Amazon.co.uk"


Author: Anonymous
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Release: 1962
Summary: The eighteen chapters of "The Bhagavad Gita" (c. 500 b.c.), the glory of Sanskrit literature, encompass the whole spiritual struggle of a human soul. Its three central themes-love, light, and life-arise from the symphonic vision of God in all things and of all things in God.

Translated by Juan Mascaró
Introduction by Simon Brodbeck


Author: Jean Ziegler
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1999
Summary: At what price neutrality? For the 50 years following World War II, Switzerland has maintained that whatever collaboration it may have engaged in with Nazi Germany was undertaken in hopes of avoiding invasion. Recently, however, foreign governments and the families of Holocaust victims have begun to take an interest in the fate of the many millions of dollars' worth of Jewish gold, works of art, and money that disappeared into numbered Swiss bank accounts during the war, never to be seen again. In "The Swiss, the Gold, and the Dead", Swiss professor and parliamentarian Jean Ziegler provides a provocative, damning portrait of the Swiss banking community and his fellow countrymen. According to Ziegler, the global financial power that Switzerland now wields is the direct result of the Nazi plunder laundered in Swiss banks, a result that the Swiss people have accepted without guilt or question. It's not surprising that Ziegler's book is controversial in his own country; the Swiss people are understandably reluctant to accept the complicity of their government in funding Hitler's war effort. What "is" disturbing is the Swiss government's continued attempts to obstruct open discussion of the past. "The Swiss, the Gold, and the Dead" will certainly make official denials a little bit harder to swallow.

Author: Dennis Covington
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1996
Summary: "Salvation on Sand Mountain" is a story of snake handling and strychnine drinking, of faith healing and speaking in tongues. It is also the story of one man's search for his roots--and, in the end, of his spiritual renewal. Writer Dennis Covington came to this ecstatic form of Christianity as a reporter covering a sensational murder case; Glen Summerford, pastor of the Church of Jesus with Signs Following, had been accused of attempting to kill his wife with rattlesnakes. There, in a courtroom filled with journalists and gawking spectators, Covington felt the pull of a spirituality that was to dominate his life for the next several years. Attending Summerford's church out of curiosity, he soon forged close friendships with some of the worshippers, began attending snake-handling services throughout the South, and eventually took up snakes himself.
With subject matter this lurid, "Salvation on Sand Mountain" could have been a Southern-fried curiosity and little more. Covington goes far deeper. Tracing the snake handlers' roots in regional history, in the deep spiritual alienation of mountain people from the secular modern world they have so recently joined, Covington is more than just sympathetic to the snake handlers; in a profound way, he considers himself one of them. His reasoning is sometimes flawed--when he attempts to find snake handlers in his own family's past, for instance, the result is belabored and unconvincing--but there's no doubt that Covington's heart is in the right place. He's also not without his own brand of sly gallows humor, as in this conversation with the elderly Gracie McAllister: "She'd swore she'd never handle rattlesnakes in July again. She'd been bit the previous two Julys. 'I decided I'd just handle fire and drink strychnine that night,' she said. "Good idea", I thought. It always pays to be on the safe side."
Covington eventually breaks with the snake handlers, but comes away from the experience a changed man. "Knowing where you come from is one thing, but it's suicide to stay there," he writes. An American Book Award winner and finalist for the National Book Award, "Salvation on Sand Mountain" is a nuanced, compassionate portrait of an unforgettable spiritual journey. "--Mary Park"


Author: G. I. Gurdjieff
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1999
Summary: Begun in 1934, this final volume of Gurdjieff's trilogy, "All and Everything", is a primary source for Gurdjieff's ideas, methods, and biography. Gurdjieff offers guidance to his "community of seekers," through a selection of talks given in 1930, autobiographical material crucial to understanding his ideas, and the incomplete essay "The Outer and Inner World of Man." Available for the first time in paperback, this is the ultimate piece of Gurdjieff's work that his numerous followers have been waiting for.

Author: Michael Murphy
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1997
Summary: Esalen Institute founder Michael Murphy's divine meditation on the royal and ancient game defied categorization when it was first published in 1972, and it still does. Instantly hailed as a classic, "Golf in the Kingdom" is an altogether unique confluence of fiction, philosophy, myth, mysticism, enchantment, and golf instruction. The central character is a wily Scotsman named Shivas Irons, a golf professional by vocation and a shaman by design, whom Murphy, as participant in his own novel, meets in 1956 on the links of Burningbush, in Fife. The story of their round of golf together culminates in a wild night of whiskey and wisdom where, as Shivas demonstrates how the swing reflects the soul, their golf quite literally takes on a metaphysical glow. The events alter not only Murphy's game, but they also radically alter his mind and inner vision; it's truly unforgettable. For a golfer, Murphy's masterpiece is as essential as a set of clubs.

Author: Abraham H. Maslow
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1994
Summary: Maslow makes a good distinction between the peakers and the non-peakers and makes an excellent connection between this and organized religion. His use of the term "non-peakers" is not to refer to people who do not have peak experiences, for he believes that every one has peak experiences but he uses this terminology to refer to a person who is afraid of peak experiences The purpose of organized religion for him is to communicate peak experiences to non-peakers. His position tend to advance personal revelation over dogmatic revelations. The question he leaves unanswered is how personal revelations can be verified or validated? I believe organized religion will help in confirming peak experiences. If not, what most people might call peak experiences might just be neurosis.

He also advances a religious pluralism that will accommodate every person, both the atheist and the believer. Maslow gives us good insights into peak experiences and helps us to appreciate more these experiences. His book is interesting to read and easy to follow. I enjoyed reading the book.


Author: Abraham H. Maslow
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1993
Summary: ....about the possibilities of becoming fully human. This was one of the books that inspired me to study psychology. An eminently sane look at the "higher reaches" from the psychologist who dared to wonder why we study sickness but not health.

Author: Jules Cashford, Anne Baring
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1993
Summary: Simply put, this is one of the best books out there on the Many-Named Goddess. The two authors spent over ten years researching and writing this book and it shows. The book traces the evolution of the Divine Feminine from Inanna, to Ishtar, to Isis, to Gaia, to Athena, to Aphrodite, to Cybele, to Sophia and more. Excellent resource for both experts and amateurs.

As for the blissfully ignorant reviewer who states that matriarchical cultures are feminist pseudo-history, I challenge them to find one reputable scholar/archaeologist who believes otherwise. (By 'reputable scholar/archaeologist' I mean someone who isn't going to try to convince me that God made the world in six literal days...)


Author: Thomas Pynchon
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Release: 1995
Summary: Tyrone Slothrop, a GI in London in 1944, has a big problem. Whenever he gets an erection, a Blitz bomb hits. Slothrop gets excited, and then (as Thomas Pynchon puts it in his sinister, insinuatingly sibilant opening sentence), "a screaming comes across the sky," heralding an angel of death, a V-2 rocket. The novel's title, "Gravity's Rainbow", refers to the rocket's vapor arc, a cruel dark parody of what God sent Noah to symbolize his promise never to destroy humanity again. History has been a big trick: the plan is to switch from floods to obliterating fire from the sky.
Slothrop's father was an unwitting part of the cosmic doublecross. To provide for the boy's future Harvard education, he took cash from the mad German scientist Laszlo Jamf, who performed Pavlovian experiments on the infant Tyrone. Laszlo invented Imipolex G, a new plastic useful in rocket insulation, and conditioned Tyrone's privates to respond to its presence. Now the grown-up Tyrone helplessly senses the Imipolex G in incoming V-2s, and his military superiors are investigating him. Soon he is on the run from legions of bizarre enemies through the phantasmagoric horrors of Germany.
That's just the Imipolex G tip of the shrieking vehicle that is Pynchon's book. It's pretty much impossible to follow a standard plot; one must have faith that each manic episode is connected with the great plot to blow up the world with the ultimate rocket. There is not one story, but a proliferation of characters (Pirate Prentice, Teddy Bloat, Tantivy Mucker-Maffick, Saure Bummer, and more) and events that tantalize the reader with suggestions of vast patterns only just past our comprehension. You will enjoy Pynchon's cartoon inferno far more if you consult Steven Weisenburger's brief companion to the novel, which sorts out Pynchon's blizzard of references to science, history, high culture, and the lowest of jokes. Rest easy: there really is a simple reason why Kekulé von Stradonitz's dream about a serpent biting its tail (which solved the structure of the benzene molecule) belongs in the same novel as the comic-book-hero Plastic Man.
Pynchon doesn't want you to rest easy with solved mysteries, though. "Gravity's Rainbow" uses beautiful prose to induce an altered state of consciousness, a buzz. It's a trip, and it will last. "--Tim Appelo"


Author: Hannah Arendt
Publisher: Penguin Classics
Release: 1994
Summary: While living in Argentina in 1960, Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann was kidnapped and smuggled to Israel where he was put on trial for crimes against humanity. The "New Yorker" magazine sent Hannah Arendt to cover the trial. While covering the technical aspects of the trial, Arendt also explored the wider themes inherent in the trial, such as the nature of justice, the behavior of the Jewish leadership during the Nazi Régime, and, most controversially, the nature of Evil itself.
Far from being evil incarnate, as the prosecution painted Eichmann, Arendt maintains that he was an average man, a petty bureaucrat interested only in furthering his career, and the evil he did came from the seductive power of the totalitarian state and an unthinking adherence to the Nazi cause. Indeed, Eichmann's only defense during the trial was "I was just following orders."
Arendt's analysis of the seductive nature of evil is a disturbing one. We would like to think that anyone who would perpetrate such horror on the world is different from us, and that such atrocities are rarities in our world. But the history of groups such as the Jews, Kurds, Bosnians, and Native Americans, to name but a few, seems to suggest that such evil is all too commonplace. In revealing Eichmann as the pedestrian little man that he was, Arendt shows us that the veneer of civilization is a thin one indeed.


Author: Jack Kerouac
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1992
Summary: Kerouac's Big Sur, written after his mega-success with On The Road, could be argued as a very dark, depressing read. On the contrary, I found it very revealing about one of my favorite writers, and his frame of mind at the time.

Given the opportunity to seclude himself from his friends, fame, and drinking to excess in the cabin of a friend, Kerouac sinks into a sort of paranoia and anxiety, and finally gives in to his impulse to return to 'civilization'....and then proceeds to invite a group back to the cabin, leading him to realize that his most recent affair was with a girl he didn't actually love.

The most fascinating aspect of this novel, to me, is not the horrific volume of drinking Kerouac does at this stage of his life, but in the fact that though he was put off by his fame, and being dubbed 'the King of the Beats', and at being hounded by ardent fans who wanted to merely be in his presence...he couldn't stand the isolation.

Also of interest to me was the 'honesty' he put into his feelings about the actions of his fans...they say 'imitation is the sincerest form of flattery', but Kerouac seemed to think just the opposite...and all but told his fans/readers to 'get a life' in several passages of the book. Those in his industry, who rely so heavily on fan-support rarely ever are so vocal about their distaste for those same fans, without a severely negative impact on their sales.

An excellent read, though if you are looking for 'uplifting', spiritually awakening wisdom from the 'king of the beats', look elsewhere. This book is a downward spiral into the darker recesses of Kerouac's alcohol-induced delirium.


Author: Carl G. Jung
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1976
Summary: This is a fascinating book on Jungian thought and his psychological concepts. If you avoid being intimidated by the size of the book, and you methodically go through each page from the beginning to the end, you will grasp the extent and depth of Jung's intellect and ideas.

The word "archetype" is used by Jung to describe the concept of the strong unseen influences that result in predictable psychological states. He describes an archetype as psychic in form where instinct and conditioned behaviour can be observed in the behaviour of people. This can be observed in religious symbols, fairytales and stories.

Jung describes the existence of three layered psyche consisting of the conscious or active part of the mind, the personal unconscious, that is thinking over which we have little or no control and the collective unconscious, which he describes as animal-instinctive mental activity. The collective unconscious tells us that people are the same at the lowest, biological levels.

The book is a must read for those people who want a deeper understanding of their existence and some tools to help them explore the unknown. I recommend reading Jung's works and then compare and contrast them with that of Freud, who uses a different style. Reading these contrasting works should enable one to have a fuller appreciation of their existence.


Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1977
Summary: Frederick Nietzsche writes with a force and passion rarely found amongst philosophers. His ability to coherently place his powerful and ranging intellect onto paper is simply amazing.

I recommend this collection for any and everyone who is not afraid to have their convictions tried and tested. Particularly if your of a Christian or liberal persuasion. Nietzsche damns, despises and condemns most of the values modern Western nations possess, including, democracy, equality, social justice, pity for the poor and unfortunate etc. I recommend starting with Twilight of the Idols as Nietzsche swiftly and passionately summarizes his values here. After reading Twilight of the Idols you will have laid a solid foundation to read the rest of the collection. This compendium may irritate, offend, or anger you, but be assured you will never be bored.


Author: James Campbell
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1991
Summary: I recently used this text in a graduate course on the early Middle Ages. I like it because it does several things really well -- most of what is written about the period tends to focus on the period after Alfred the Great because historians are rightly dependent upon written sources that become relatively more plentiful in the later period. This text draws on archaeology really nicely and gives a lot of good visuals. The sidebar discussions of things like estimating the populations of medieval cities are really nice jumping off points for discussion. The book does gloss over several ongoing historiographical debates and becomes, I think, problematically idiosyncratic for the eleventh century. It also lacks discussion of some important issues such as institutional and military history (which is hard to write about in an engaging fashion) and women's history. I wouldn't use it in an undergrad course without a lot of supplementation.

Author: Scott Rice
Publisher: Penguin USA (P)
Release: 1984
Summary: It was a hot and dusty night (for you see, dear review reader, I live in a desert, where the nocturnal temperatures sometimes do not go below 90 degrees -- that is in the height of summer, as when I began this humorous tome I am reviewing) when I sat down to read the submissions of frustrated Victorian 'wannabees' who have more time on their hands than American Vice Presidents (present times excluded, of course) to dish out poorly conceived sentences modeled on that paragon of forgotten 19th Century literature, Bulwer-Lytton, whose flowery prose brings to mind the brain of soap opera producers who don't know when to stop; and neither did I, because this book was so darn funny, I almost wet myself -- therefore, I highly recommend it as a pleasant diversion better than Buffy the Vampire Slayer -- and that's saying a lot.

Author: Jack Kerouac
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Release: 1971
Summary: One of the best and most popular of Kerouac's autobiographical novels, "The Dharma Bums" is based on experiences the writer had during the mid-1950s while living in California, after he'd become interested in Buddhism's spiritual mode of understanding. One of the book's main characters, Japhy Ryder, is based on the real poet Gary Snyder, who was a close friend and whose interest in Buddhism influenced Kerouac. This book is a must-read for any serious Kerouac fan.

Author: Nancy Ashley
Publisher: Prentice Hall Trade
Release: 1984
Summary:

Author: Edward Hoffman
Publisher: Mcgraw-Hill
Release: 1999
Summary: "...a solid history of uniquely American intellectual tradition..."--Kirkus Reviews. "...a fascinating and useful study."--The Los Angeles Times. "...a great deal for those seeking greater insight...."--Psychology Today. "Maslow laid the foundation for the human side of management. All students of and particpants in the human community, especially the management and organization of work, should read this seminal biography."--Warren Bennis. Recognized as one of the greatest influences on contemporary psychology, Abraham Maslow created the seminal concepts of team-decision and management, self-actualization and higher motivation. This edition of the critically acclaimed 1988 classic fully captures the renewed popularity of Maslow's business applications--what they are, what they mean, and why.

Author: Morris N. Eagle
Publisher: Mcgraw-Hill
Release: 1984
Summary:

Author: Charles T. Tart
Publisher: Harper
Release: 1990
Summary: This selection stirred my couriousity and sparked my interest in finding the ultimate reality. We are all on a quest man. A quest to reveal what we lies in our thoughtless minds. An informational and enjoyable read.

Author: Huston Smith
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 1991
Summary: "The World's Religions", by Huston Smith, has been a standard introduction to its eponymous subject since its first publication in 1958. Smith writes humbly, forswearing judgment on the validity of world religions. His introduction asks, "How does it all sound from above? Like bedlam, or do the strains blend in strange, ethereal harmony? ... We cannot know. All we can do is try to listen carefully and with full attention to each voice in turn as it addresses the divine. Such listening defines the purpose of this book." His criteria for inclusion and analysis of religions in this book are "relevance to the modern mind" and "universality," and his interest in each religion is more concerned with its principles than its context. Therefore, he avoids cataloging the horrors and crimes of which religions have been accused, and he attempts to show each "at their best." Yet "The World's Religions" is no pollyannaish romp: "It is about religion alive," Huston writes. "It calls the soul to the highest adventure it can undertake, a proposed journey across the jungles, peaks, and deserts of the human spirit. The call is to confront reality." And by translating the voices of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Confucianism, Christianity, and Judaism, among others, Smith has amplified the divine call for generations of readers. "--Michael Joseph Gross"

Author: Marija Gimbutas
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Release: 1994
Summary: For all those who are interested in a learned and well documented alternative view on the prehistory of Europe - the best you can do is to read this work! Gimbutas was one of the worlds leading archaeologists and even her opponents had to admit that virtually no one could match her encyclopaedic archaeological knowledge. Then she started to argue that there has been a prehistoric matrifocal culture in Europe where the Goddess were worshipped and suddenly she was quite mariginalized in the academic community. Of cource no on denied her outstanding archaelogical knowledge but she was suddenly not politically correct in this male dominated community. If you read this powerful book you realize why. This book presents the essence of Gimbutas life long research and her final conclusions.

Author: Huston Smith
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 1992
Summary:
This classic companion to "The World's Religions" articulates the remarkable unity that underlies the world's religious traditions


Author: Robert Moore, Douglas Gillette
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 1991
Summary: Arguing that mature masculinity is not abusive or domineering, but generative, creative, and empowering of the self and others, Moore and Gillette provide a Jungian introduction to the psychological foundations of a mature, authentic, and revitalized masculinity.

Author: Michael Harner
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 1990
Summary:
The phenomenal bestseller, with more than 500,000 copies sold worldwide, now with a new epilogue from the author--"The Chalice and the Blade" has inspired a generation of women and men to envision a truly egalitarian society by exploring the legacy of the peaceful, goddess-worshipping cultures from our prehistoric past.


Author: Riane Eisler
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 1988
Summary: Some books are like revelations, they open the spirit to unimaginable possibilities. "The Chalice and the Blade" is one of those magnificent key books that can transform us and...initiate fundamental changes in the world. With the most passionate eloquence, Riane Eisler proves that the dream of peace is not an impossible utopia. -- Isabelle Allende, author of The House of the Spirits

Author: Riane Eisler
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 1996
Summary: Riane Eisler shows us how history has consistently promoted the link between sex and violence--and how we can sever this link and move to a politics of partnership rather than domination in all our relations.

Author: Heinz Ansbacher, Rowena R Ansbacher
Publisher: Harper Perennial
Release: 1964
Summary: Taking into account the immense importance of Adler, as one of the pivotal trinity (alongside Freud and Jung) of the psychoanalytical movement, add to that the lack of the mans actual writings in any bookstore's psychology bookshelf, or for that matter the popularization and somewhat cheapening of Adlerian concepts into today's pop jargon of psychobabble without going to the man's actual writings and you have a strong case why this book is a fine selection and the best of it's kind in it's treatment on the mans philosophy with solid commentary by the authors/compilers prefacing within it's historical context the actual text.
Approaching Adler is at times a difficult task as is reading Jung or for that matter any analytical philosopher/psychologist but the reward is immeasurable since the purpose of mining nuggets is not the purpose but what needs to be the goal is capturing the essence of the man's evolution and the contributions he made to the mental health profession with his keen understanding of instinct,teleolgy,the often misinterpreted notions of power,inferiority all within a framework of the individual psychology attributed to him IE: the social assimilation of the individual within the world of his making despite whatever limitations are inherent from birth,upbringing and the outside world in itself.
Understanding where Freud,Jung and Adler coalesce and separate is a worthy endeavor as this book clearly offers a full exposition and depth of Adler as a segue into the roots of these men and what they accomplished in their day and whose contributions remain invaluable today despite the obvious shift away from traditional psychoanalysis.


Author: Christopher Isherwood
Publisher: HarperCollins
Release: 2000
Summary:
The English writer Christopher Isherwood settled in California in 1939 and spent the war years working in Hollywood film studios, teaching English to European refugees, and converting to Hinduism. By the time the war ended, he realized he was not cut out to be a monk. With his self-imposed wartime vigil behind him, he careened into a life of frantic socializing, increasing dissipation, anxiety, and, eventually, despair. For nearly a half decade he all but ceased to write fiction and even abandoned his lifelong habit of keeping a diary.
This is Isherwood's own account, reconstructed from datebooks, letters, and memory nearly thirty years later, of his experience during those missing years: his activities in Santa Monica, and also in New York and London, just after the war. Begun in 1971, in a postsixties atmosphere of liberation, "Lost Years" includes explicit details of his romantic and sexual relationships during the 1940s and unveils a hidden and sometimes shocking way of life shared with friends and acquaintances--many of whom were well-known artists, actors, and film-makers. Not until the 1951 Broadway success of "I Am a Camera," adapted from his Berlin stories, did Isherwood begin to reclaim control of his talents and of his future.
Isherwood never prepared "Lost years" for publication because he rapidly became caught up in writing the book that established him as a hero of gay liberation, "Christopher and His Kind."
With unpolished directness, and with insight and wit, "Lost Years" shows how Isherwood developed his private recollections into the unique mixture of personal mythology and social history that characterizes much of his best work. This surprising and important memoir also highlights his determination to track down even the most elusive and unappealing aspects of his past in order to understand and honestly portray himself, both as a writer and as a human being.


Author: Christopher Isherwood
Publisher: HarperCollins
Release: 1997
Summary: Christopher Isherwood is noted for his novels and autobiographical writings, especially The Berlin Stories (the basis for the film, Cabaret) and Christopher and His Kind. But Isherwood put at least as much of his genius in his "Diaries" as he did in his writings intended for immediate publication. The first volume follows Isherwood as he emigrates from England to the United States where he became a Hollywood scriptwriter. This volume continues with his lifelong affair with Don Bachardy to his establishment as a major writer in the early 1960s. Isherwood's "Diaries" are beautifully written, gossipy, and indispensable for anyone who cares about writing, the creative process, and gay history.

Author: Wayne W. Dyer
Publisher: HarperTorch
Release: 1999
Summary:
From the inspirational leader and author of the international bestsellers "Your Sacred Self" and the classic "Your Erroneous Zones" comes this mind-awakening guidebook for making your desires reality.
Based on ancient principles and spiritual practices, "Manifest Your Destiny "introduces the Nine Spiritual Principles that will help you overcome the barriers--both within and around you--that prevent you from getting what you want, including:
Developing spiritual awareness

Trusting yourself

Reconnecting to your environment

Attracting your desires

Accepting your own worthiness

Practicing unconditional love

Meditating to unlock the power within you

Letting go of demands

Filled with warmth and insight, this invaluable book will help you achieve your goals--and take you to a level higher than you've ever dreamed.


Author: Hans J. Massaquoi
Publisher: Harper Perennial
Release: 2001
Summary:
This is a story of the unexpected. In "Destined to Witness", Hans Massaquoi has crafted a beautifully rendered memoir -- an astonishing true tale of how he came of age as a black child in Nazi Germany. The son of a prominent African and a German nurse, Hans remained behind with his mother when Hitler came to power, due to concerns about his fragile health, after his father returned to Liberia. Like other German boys, Hans went to school; like other German boys, he swiftly fell under the Fuhrer's spell. So he was crushed to learn that, as a black child, he was ineligible for the Hitler Youth. His path to a secondary education and an eventual profession was blocked. He now lived in fear that, at any moment, he might hear the Gestapo banging on the door -- or Allied bombs falling on his home. Ironic,, moving, and deeply human, Massaquoi's account of this lonely struggle for survival brims with courage and intelligence.


Author: Wayne W. Dyer
Publisher: Harper Paperbacks
Release: 2003
Summary:
In "There's a Spiritual Solution to Every Problem", bestselling author Wayne W. Dyer offers compelling testimony on the power of love, harmony, and service. When confronted with a problem, be it ill health, financial worries, or relationship difficulties, we often depend on intellect to solve it. But in this inspiring book, Dyer shows us that there is an omnipotent spiritual force at our fingertips that contains the solution to our problems. Drawing from the various spiritual traditions, especially from the prayer of Saint Francis of Assisi, Dyer helps us unplug from the material world and awaken to the divine within.
The first part of the book provides the essential foundation for spiritual problem solving, drawing from the wisdom of Patanjali, a Yogi mystic; the second half focuses on the legacy of Saint Francis. Dyer offers specific practical applications for applying the teachings of these wise men to everyday problems, including affirmations, writing exercises, and guided meditations.


Author: Wayne W. Dyer
Publisher: Harper Paperbacks
Release: 1998
Summary: Change your life using Wayne W. Dyer's astonishing Nine Spiritual Principles:
Are the decisions and actions in your life controlled by your ego? Do you have an ever-present need to defend yourself? See "The First Principle."
Do you inherently trust yourself and your decisions? Are you weighed down with troubles or unresolved issues in your life? See "The Second Principle."
Do you feel out of touch with your environment? Are your days more often out of synch than in? See "The Third Principle."
Do you have limits in your life that prevent you from making changes or achieving your highest goals? See "The Fourth Principle."
Do you love what you do, and do what you love, in life? Are you constrained by feelings of unworthiness? See "The Fifth Principle."
Is your day filled with high energy and the feeling that "everything is going my way"? Or do you experience frustration or anger? See "The Sixth Principle."
How would your life change after learning to attract what you want -- peace or love, job advancement or monetary fortune? See "The Seventh Principle."
Do you believe that the universe operates randomly? Are you impatient waiting for good things to happen? See "The Eighth Principle."
Do you complain, find fault or take for granted more than you appreciate your life? See "The Ninth Principle."


Author: Marianne Williamson
Publisher: Harper Paperbacks
Release: 1996
Summary:
Back by popular demand -- and newly updated by the author -- the mega-bestselling spiritual guide in which Marianne Williamson shares her reflections on "A Course in Miracles" and her insights on the application of love in the search for inner peace.
Williamson reveals how we each can become a miracle worker by accepting God and by the expression of love in our daily lives. Whether psychic pain is in the area of relationships, career, or health, she shows us how love is a potent force, the key to inner peace, and how by practicing love we can make our own lives more fulfilling while creating a more peaceful and loving world for our children.


Author: Michael Talbot
Publisher: Harper Perennial
Release: 1992
Summary:
Today nearly everyone is familiar with holograms, three-dimensional images projected into space with the aid of a laser. Now, two of the world's most eminent thinkers -- University of London physicists David Bohm, a former protege of Einstein's and one of the world's most respected quantum physicists, and Stanford neurophysiologist Karl Pribram, one of the architects of our modern understanding of the brain -- believe that the universe itself may be a giant hologram, quite literally a kind of image or construct created, at least in part, by the human mind. This remarkable new way of looking at the universe explains now only many of the unsolved puzzles of physics, but also such mysterious occurrences as telepathy, out-of-body and near death experiences, "lucid" dreams, and even religious and mystical experiences such as feelings of cosmic unity and miraculous healings.


Author: Thomas Moore
Publisher: Harper Paperbacks
Release: 1994
Summary: "Care of the Soul" is considered to be one of the best primers for soul work ever written. Thomas Moore, an internationally renowned theologian and former Catholic monk, offers a philosophy for living that involves accepting our humanity rather than struggling to transcend it. By nurturing the soul in everyday life, Moore shows how to cultivate dignity, peace, and depth of character. For example, in addressing the importance of daily rituals he writes, "Ritual maintains the world's holiness. As in a dream a small object may assume significance, so in a life that is animated by ritual there are no insignificant things." This is the eloquence that helped reintroduce the sacred into everyday language and contemporary values.

Author: Pierre Teilhard De Chardin
Publisher: Perennial
Release: 1975
Summary: A spiritual treasure for every religion bookshelf. De Chardin, geologist and priest, probes the ultimate meaning of all physical exploration and the fruit of his own inner life. "Extraordinary."--Karl Stern

Author: Aldous Huxley
Publisher: Perennial
Release: 1990
Summary: "Both an anthology and an interpretation of the supreme mystics, East and West. . . . A magnificent achievement."--Rufus M. Jones "In his absorption and other-worldliness, he soars clear out of sight."--"The New Yorker"

Author: Marianne Williamson
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 2006
Summary:
Every Change Is a Challenge to Become Who We Really Are


Author: Aldous Huxley
Publisher: Harper Perennial Modern Classics
Release: 2005
Summary:
The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's vision of the future -- of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient scientific and psychological engineering, people are genetically designed to be passive and therefore consistently useful to the ruling class. This powerful work of speculative fiction sheds a blazing critical light on the present and is considered to be Huxley's most enduring masterpiece.
Following Brave New World is the nonfiction work Brave New World Revisited, first published in 1958. It is a fascinating work in which Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with the prophetic fantasy envisioned in Brave New World, including threats to humanity, such as overpopulation, propaganda, and chemical persuasion.


Author: American Academy Of Religion
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 1995
Summary: Led by general editor Jonathan Z. Smith, a team drawn from the American Academy of Religion has collected more than 3,200 entries written by 327 leading experts from around the world and across the theological and religious spectrum. The exceptional editorial team includes associate editor William Scott Green and area editors Jorunn Jacobsen Buckley, Lawrence S. Cunningham, Gary L. Ebersole, Malcom David Eckel, Sam D. Gill, Alfred Hiltebeitel, Richard C. Martin, Carole A. Myscofski, Jacob Neusner, and Hans H. Penner.Designed for the general reader, this highly accessible resource addresses everything from the great living traditions such as Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism and Judaism to the very latest new religions. Diverse topics -- from the experience of women in Islam to the troublesome realities of religion and violence -- are covered with compelling facts and figures, eloquent prose, and riveting accuracy.Have You Ever WonderedWhat draws a person to alternative religious traditions? And what exactly is a "cult"?What are the branches on the Jewish Chanukah menorah symbolize? And why bitter herbs are eaten at Passover?Why children color eggs at Easter time? What a tree has to do with Christmas?Why is there such a debate over the ordination of women in the Catholic Church?If organized religion is necessary for a fulfilled humankind? How it all began, anyway?All these questions and much, much more are answered in this essential and powerful new tool: The "HarperCollins Dictionary of Religion" -- the definitive guide to understanding religion today.

Author: Martin Heidegger
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 1962
Summary:
One of the most important philosophical works of our time -- a work that has had tremendous influence on philosophy, literature, and psychology, and has literally changed the intellectual map of the modern world.


Author: Mircea Eliade, Ioan P. Culianu, Hillary S. Wiesner
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 1991
Summary: This guide to the world's religions, past and present, distills Eliade's three-volume "History of Religious Ideas" and sixteen-volume "Encyclopedia of Religion" into one up-to-date and accessible volume.

Author: Aldous Huxley
Publisher: Harper Perennial Modern Classics
Release: 2004
Summary: Sometimes a writer has to revisit the classics, and here we find that "gonzo journalism"--gutsy first-person accounts wherein the author is part of the story--didn't originate with Hunter S. Thompson or Tom Wolfe. Aldous Huxley took some mescaline and wrote about it some 10 or 12 years earlier than those others. The book he came up with is part bemused essay and part mystical treatise--"suchness" is everywhere to be found while under the influence. This is a good example of essay writing, journal keeping, and the value of controversy--always--in one's work.

Author: Aldous Huxley
Publisher: Harper Perennial Modern Classics
Release: 2004
Summary:
The Perennial Philosophy is defined by its author as "The metaphysic that recognizes a divine Reality substantial to the world of things and lives and minds." With great wit and stunning intellect, Aldous Huxley examines the spiritual beliefs of various religious traditions and explains them in terms that are personally meaningful.


Author: Leigh Schmidt
Publisher: HarperSanFrancisco
Release: 2005
Summary:
Yoga classes and Zen meditation, New Age seminars and holistic workshops, the Oprah Winfrey Show, and books by Deepak Chopra -- all are part of the religious experimentation that has surprisingly deep roots in American history. In fact, they represent only the most recent flowerings of a unique form of spirituality. By tracing our spiritual heritage along its many colorful highways and eccentric byways, Restless Souls profiles a rich spirituality that is distinctively American.
Since the 1960s, our expanded and enhanced spiritual explorations have changed us from a nation of church goers into a culture of seekers. But the American fascination with mystical experience and churchless spirituality goes back much further than the psychedelic era. In Restless Souls, historian Leigh Schmidt deftly traces this American romance with the interior life from the likes of transcendentalist Ralph Waldo Emerson to television host Oprah Winfrey, from poet Walt Whitman to Senator Barak Obama, from questing psychologist William James to Zen basketball coach Phil Jackson. We're taken from pioneer Johnny Appleseed to translator of Sufi poetry Coleman Barks, from theosophist Madame Blavatsky to meditation guru Ram Dass, and then to many more.
This book places the most recent spiritual upsurge in the context of a broader cultural and intellectual history. In contrast to prevailing fears about the conservative influence of religion in America, Restless Souls depicts a vibrantly open American spirituality and serves as a timely reminder of the ample religious resources of the liberal tradition.


Author: Samantha Power
Publisher: Harper Perennial
Release: 2003
Summary: During the three years (1993-1996) Samantha Power spent covering the grisly events in Bosnia and Srebrenica, she became increasingly frustrated with how little the United States was willing to do to counteract the genocide occurring there. After much research, she discovered a pattern: "The United States had never in its history intervened to stop genocide and had in fact rarely even made a point of condemning it as it occurred," she writes in this impressive book. Debunking the notion that U.S. leaders were unaware of the horrors as they were occurring against Armenians, Jews, Cambodians, Iraqi Kurds, Rwandan Tutsis, and Bosnians during the past century, Power discusses how much was known and when, and argues that much human suffering could have been alleviated through a greater effort by the U.S. She does not claim that the U.S. alone could have prevented such horrors, but does make a convincing case that even a modest effort would have had significant impact. Based on declassified information, private papers, and interviews with more than 300 American policymakers, Power makes it clear that a lack of political will was the most significant factor for this failure to intervene. Some courageous U.S. leaders did work to combat and call attention to ethnic cleansing as it occurred, but the vast majority of politicians and diplomats ignored the issue, as did the American public, leading Power to note that "no U.S. president has ever suffered politically for his indifference to its occurrence. It is thus no coincidence that genocide rages on." This powerful book is a call to make such indifference a thing of the past. "--Shawn Carkonen"

Author: Abraham Harold Maslow
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Release: 1987
Summary: The book's title and author intrigued me in the first place. I'd heard about Maslow's hierarchy of needs in college. Usually, about half a page or so was dedicated to it in general college psychology textbooks. What a disservice! Dipping one's big toe in the swimming pool is not the same as plunging into it. This book deserves to be plunged into, marked up, highlighted, commented on, thought about, and discussed. It is brilliant, original, fascinating, and readable. I'm not sure how to say it because there is so much, but I would say that what makes it especially unique is its study of psychologically healthy people (Maslow calls them self-actualizing people). This book will turn your brain on. I am not a technically/medically trained person. It took time to read trough Motivation and Personality, mostly because I wanted to stop and think about what it was saying. It's not a rush through kind of book. This book, as well as Dr. Peck's "People of Lie," exposed a whole new layer of the world I live in. I believe it fine tunes perceptions and make one so much more aware and alive.

Author: Abraham Harold, Ed. Maslow
Publisher: HarperCollins
Release: 1959
Summary:

Author: George W., Jr. Stocking
Publisher: Free Press
Release: 1991
Summary: Stocking's "Victorian Anthropolgy" proves that there was life before Darwin. The book begins with an overview of anthropological theories, both in England and in Europe, and examines how political influences determined which of these were accepted by English scholars. Fixed firmly in the context of Victorian England, Stocking clearly shows the extent to which anthropological treatises influenced not only scientific thought but also social policy. An informative and enlightening book, "Victorian Anthropology" would be particularly useful to students of British cultural and/or anthropological history.

Author: E. Franklin Frazier
Publisher: Free Press
Release: 1965
Summary: "When it was first published in 1957, Black Bourgeoisie was simultaneously revered and reviled because it cast a critical eye on one of the cornerstones of the black American community--its middle class. In the 1950s, before the recent burgeoning of the black middle class, Frazier identified the problems that occur in the aftermath of 'black-flight' from the inner cities and black communities of the rural South. The book's relevance has only increased as over the years the divide between increasingly prosperous middle-class blacks and their increasingly desperate 'underclass' brethren has grown into an almost uncrossable chasm. ý By tracing the evolution of the black bourgeoisie, from the segregated South to the integrated North, Frazier shows how the blacks who comprised the middle class have lost their cohesion by moving out of black communities and attempting to integrate white communities. The result of this integration 'is an anomalous bourgeois class with no identity, built on self-sustaining myths of black business and society, silently undermined by a collective, debilitating inferiority complex.' Frazier hoped to dispel the image of blacks as having thrown off the psychological and economical ravages of slavery to become economically powerful, because according to Frazier, it was a lie that was damaging the community. ý Frazier, chairman of the Department of Sociology at Howard University and president of the International Society for the Scientific Study of Race Relations, hoped that Black Bourgeoisie would impel blacks to make changes that would empower their community. For the most part, those hoped-for changes have not occurred. Nevertheless, today, as many black people are calling into question the very existence and relevance of an autonomous 'black community,' his book offers a fascinating perspective on the costs of that community's dissolution."--Sacred Fire

Author: Fiona Horne
Publisher: Thorsons
Release: 2001
Summary: Have a magickal makeover with this charming day by day guide from the bestselling author Fiona Horne.

Author: Fiona Horne
Publisher: Thorsons
Release: 2002
Summary: In this book, the beautiful Fiona Horne reveals the intimate secrets and know-how of her spiritual calling, including the daily business of being a modern Witch at home, work, and play.

Author: Christopher Partridge
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 2003
Summary:
In France, a UFO group known as the Raelian Movement works to create the first Embassy welcoming extra terrestrials from space, claiming that the world is the work of an alien people who built it from DNA. The Aetherius Society of Great Britain claims to receive cosmic transmissions from space intelligences, offering the chance to listen to online recordings of a spoken transmission from Jesus Christ. In San Diego, March 1997, 39 members of the Heaven's Gate group commit mass suicide at the appearance of the Hale-Bopp comet, believing that heavenly beings on a UFO wait there to gather them into the Kingdom of Heaven. There is no doubt that the spectre of the UFO, as popularised by shows such as The X-Files, has brought an astonishing and often apocalyptic slant to the motley face of modern religious practice. But what motivates the fantastical and occasionally sinister beliefs of UFO worshippers? Why are people apparently so keen to believe that the truth really is 'out there'? Does the image of the extra-terrestrial ever inspire love, or rather fundamentalism, instability and violence?
"UFO" "Religions" is an essential introduction to UFO-based belief throughout the Western world. Composed entirely of readable new articles by leading international scholars, it critically examines some of the most fascinating issues surrounding UFO worship - abduction narratives, UFO-based interpretations of Biblical and other religions, the growth of pseudo-sciences purporting to explain UFOs and extra-terrestrials, and the responses of the core scientific community to such claims. Focusing on contemporary global UFO groups including the Raelian Movement, Heaven's Gate, Australia's Ashtar Command network, Unarius and the Ansaaru Allah Community, it combines sociological, psychological and anthropological perspectives to give a clear profile of modern UFO societies, controversies and beliefs.


Author: S. Wellbeloved
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 2002
Summary:
This title offers clear definitions of Gurdjieff's teaching terms, placing him within the political, geographical and cultural context of his time. Entries look at diverse aspects of his work, including: possible sources in religious, theosophical, occult, esoteric and literary traditions; the integral relationships between different aspects of the teaching; its internal contradictions and subversive aspects; the derivation of Gurdjieff's cosmological laws and Ennegram; and the receptive form of "new work" teaching introduced by Jeanne de Salzmann. An accessible and cross-referenced A-Z guidebook, this is a useful companion for both the newcomer and those more versed in Gurdjieff's thought and teachings.


Author: S. Sutcliffe
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Release: 2003
Summary:
Children of the New Age, a pioneering history of the New Age phenomenon, combines original ethnographic research with rare archival material to give a definitive overview of New Age belief and practice from the 1930s to the present day. It chronicles the development of alternative spirituality from embryonic beginnings to a universal trend: from its inception within the underground enclaves of Rosicrucians, occultists and Alice Bailey's neo-theosophists to its modern-day incursion into mainstream political, musical and artistic culture. But this is also a distinctly critical history. New Age culture, says Steven J. Sutcliffe, is notoriously variegated and hotly contested, exposed to competing strands of revelation and apocalypse. Caught between the hippy explosion and the doomsday scenarios of millennial Christianity and UFO groups, it has been the preserve both of extreme religious individualists and of humanistic countercultures lauding the Edenic perfection of this worldly existence. At stake in its history are controversial questions of value, and of its perceived status as a discrete and unified "movement." Supported by firsthand accounts of the author's adventures in counterculture, including firewalking, spiritual healing workshops and life within a Findhorn communitiy, and by archival correspondence and publications recovering "lost" history of alternative spirituality during the 1950s and 1960s; this is a thoughtful and colorful survey of the trends and controversies that accompany the concept of New Age. It calls for a fresh understanding of New Age as an emergent and fragmented form of folk idiom, complete with its own revealing loyalties and fractures; not a unified "movement" or "new religion", but a diffuse cultural force reflecting ever-shifting currents of popular sentiment.


Author: Paul Bishop
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1999
Summary:
"Jung in Contexts" is a unique collection of the most important essays on Carl Jung and analytical psychology over the past two decades. Paul Bishop's comprehensive introduction traces the growth and development of analytical psychology and its institutions. The essays which follow place Jung's life and work in three important contexts: historical, literary and intellectual.

Contributors explore diverse issues such as Jung's attitude towards National Socialism and his reading of E.T.A. Hoffman. His work is also viewed in terms of the traditions of German and French thought which influenced him. This compilation is an indispensable introduction for all those interested in Jung.

Contributors: Paul Bishop, Stanley Grossman, Pete A.Y. Gunter, John Haule, James L. Jarrett, John Kerr, Richard Noll, and Sonu Shamdasani.


Author: Richard King
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1999
Summary:
"Orientalism and Religion" offers us a timely discussion of the implications of contemporary post-colonial theory for the study of religion. Drawing on a variety of post-structuralist and post-colonial thinkers, including Foucault, Gadamer, Said, and Spivak, Richard King examines the way in which notions such as mysticism, religion, Hinduism and Buddhism are taken for granted, and shows us how religion needs to be redescribed along the lines of cultural studies.


Author: Bryan Wilson
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1999
Summary:
This collection explores the modern phenomena of new religions, and the relationship these religions have with various social institutions.

The essays discuss the relevance of various religious movements such as Hare Krishna, Jesus People and Wicca, and show the relationship between those religions and economics, law media, mental health, women and other traditional religious institutions. "New Religious Movements" provides a balanced overview of the scope of influence and complexity of new religions.


Author: C. G. Jung
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1996
Summary:

Author: E. J. Lowe
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1995
Summary:
"Locke on Human Understanding," is a comprehensive introduction to John Locke's major work, "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Locke's "Essay" remains a key work in many philosophical fields, notably in epistemology, metaphysics and the philosophies of mind and language. In addition, Locke is often referred to as the first English empiricist. Knowledge of this influential work and figure is essential to Enlightenment thought.

E. J. Lowe's approach enables students to effectively study the "Essay" by placing Locke's life and works in their intellectual and historical context. The book provides a critical examination of the leading themes in the "Essay", illuminating the main lines in Locke's thinking. Such topics include innate ideas, perception, primary and secondary qualities, personal identity, free will, action and language. Finally, E. J. Lowe examines the comtemporary work being done on this highly influential English philosopher.


Author: Richard Dyer
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1997
Summary:
White people are not simply or singularly white, yet they are called white. What does this mean in today's world where notions of race and racial representation continually reveal their complexity? Although many studies have examined the racial imagery of people of color, whiteness remains an invisible position; an absence against which other ethnicities are defined. In "White" , Richard Dyer looks beyond the apparent unremarkability of whiteness and reveals the importance of analyzing images of white people. He traces the representation of whiteness in Western visual culture, focusing on photography, fine art, cinema, television and advertising. Dyer begins by situating white imagery in the context of Christianity, "race" and colonialism and explores the significance of using the term "white." In fascinating case studies, he shows the construction of whiteness in the technology of photography and film as part of a wider "culture of light", discusses heroic white masculinity in muscle-man action cinema, from Tarzan and Hercules to Conan and Rambo, and analyzes the stifling role of white women in end-of-empire fictions like "Jewel in the Crown". Finally, Dyer traces the troublesome associations of whiteness with death in horror movies and cult dystopian films such as "Blade Runner" and the "Aliens" trilogy. Richly illustrated with 69 black and white images and 16 pages of color plates, " White" is an innovative and provocative exploration of racial imagery.


Author: Allen Siegel
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1996
Summary:
Heinz Kohut's work represents an important departure from the Freudian tradition of psychoanalysis. As one of the founders of the 'self psychology' movement in America, he had an instrumental role in one of the most important developments in psychoanalysis since Freud. Based his practice on the belief that narcissistic vulnerabilities play a significant part in the suffering that brings people for treatment, Kohut evolved an understanding of the theraputic setting, applicable to both psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. However, as Kohut's works were written predominantly for a psychoanalytic audience, they are often difficult to interpret. Proposing that in order to grasp fully the evolution of Kohut's ideas, one must know something about the man and the milieu in which he lived, Dr. Allen Siegel incorporates biographical detail from Kohut's life to aid in the understanding his works. Also included are examples from Siegel's own practice, illustrating ways in which Kohut's innovative theories can be applied to other forms of treatment.


Author: Andrew Samuels
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1993
Summary:
A radical and original study, "The Political Psyche" joins together depth psychology with politics in a way that fully reflects the discoveries made in analysis and therapy. In an attempt to show that an inner journey and a desire to fashion something practical out of passionate political convictions are linked projects, author Andrew Samuels brings an acute psychological perspective to political issues such as the distribution of wealth, the market economy, Third World development, environmentalism, and nationalism--expanding and enhancing our conception of "the political". However, keeping true to his aim of creating a two-way dialogue between depth psychology and politics, Samuels also lays bare the hidden politics of the father, the male body, and men's issues in general.

"The Political Psyche" does not collapse politics and psychology together, nor is Samuels unaware of the troubled relationship of depth psychology to the political events of the century. In the book he presents his acclaimed and cathartic work on Jung, anti-semitism and the Nazis to the wider public.

The text employs a "political" analysis to shed a fascinating light on clinical work. Samuels conducted a large-scale international survey of analysts and psychotherapists concerning what they do when their patients/clients bring overtly political material into the clinical setting. The results, including what the respondents reveal about their own political attitudes, destabilize any preconceived notions about the political sensitivity of analysis and psychotherapy.


Author: Madison Grant
Publisher: Ayer Co Pub
Release: 1970
Summary: "The Passing of The Great Race" was one of the racialist books written between 1855 and 1920 that would strongly influence the the National Socialist Party. The first was Gobineau's "The Inequality of The Human Races", the second was Houston Stewart Chamberlain's "The Foundations of The Nineteenth Century", the third was this one, and the fourth was Lothrop Stoddard's "The Rising Tide of Color Against White World Supremacy". Grant was a lawyer and conservationist who was a firm beleiver in the Old Order, free of Bolshevism and Socialism and centered around an Anglo-Saxon culture. Grant always tried to portray himself as more scientific than romantic racial theorists such as Chamberlain, but his theories actually have little scientific basis. For example, his division of Whites into Nordic, Alpine, and Mediterranean Races is anchored only on the basis of Nordic Scnadinavians having blonde hair, Alpine Slavs having brown hair, and Mediterranean Italians having black hair. Even worse is Grant's lack of historical basis. He considers the French, Southern Germans, and Poles to be a mix of Teutonic or Celtic Nordic peoples and dark-haired Alpine peoples who invaded Europe from Asia, but there was never any record of Asiatic peoples reaching France or Germany, at least not after the Celtic period. His classifications of Alpine are also very flimsy. He considers Southern Germans to be of Alpine stock, completely ignoring the fact that Southern Germans speak a Teutonic language and often have Teutonic features such as blonde hair and blue eyes. He also considers the Walloons of Belgium to be Alpine, ignoring the fact that they are descendants of the Celtic Belgae, who the Romans clearly described as being tall with blonde and red hair {sounds Nordic to me}. He also claims that the Irish and Welsh have substantial amounts of Mediterranean blood, ignoring the fact that both those peoples are Celtic and often have blonde or red hair. The most puzziling part of this whole thing is how this book became so popular when practicaly everyone is labled as inferior. Grant considers the only pure Nordics to be people with blonde hair and blue eyes, so why did people like Teddy Roosevelt {brunett} endorse it? Grant's book just lacks any spirit. I've read Chamberlain's "Foundations of The Nineteenth Century", and anyone who is of Celtic, Teutonic, or Slavic stock and is anti-Semitic will be riled up with the romaticism of the "Germanic" race being in constant battle with the Jews for survival. Anyone who has Celtic, Scandinavian, German, Anglo-Saxon, Polish, or Baltic ancestry is included in this Germanic race, while Grant tends to alienate anyone who isn't a blonde, blue-eyed Anglo-Saxon or Swede, even putting the Germans down as inferior. This book should also be compared to Stoddard's "The Rising Tide of Color", which was written four years later. Stoddard also went by the Nordic-Alpine-Mediterranean model, but focused less on this than on the White Race as a whole. Stoddard was a visionary, looking to White issue in the future. While Grant clamored about keeping non-Nordic Russians and Italians out of the country, Stoddard warned that the real dangers are non-White Asians and Negroes. Grant's book has little relevance to today's issues, as practically every White American is a German-Irish-Polish-Italian mix. Stoddard, however, saw that all Whites had to band together against the "rising tide of color".

Author: Maureen Dowd
Publisher: Putnam Adult
Release: 2005
Summary: She may be smart, incisive, witty, and keenly observant but with the release of "Are Men Necessary?"--a series of pithy (some might say piqued) ruminations on the sexes--Maureen Dowd will never, ever be championed by guys. Not that she cares. Even those who seek to avoid her columns in the august pages of "The New York Times" are certain to stumble over her invective in syndication. Dowd, it often seems, is everywhere. So those seeking even more via this book should be warned: "Are Men Necessary?" not only asks the eponymous question; it seeks to answer it with myriad examples (some convincing, some not) drawn from the "Toronto Star" to Kenneth Starr, from "Cosmopolitan" to Condoleezza Rice. You can bet a lot of folks aren't going to relish the answer.
With hands on hips and eyes wide open, Dowd surveys gender relations in contemporary settings such as the workplace, the White House, the mall, and the media, comparing and contrasting as she goes. And while her secondary sources are endless--and, let's face it, the subject of gender inequality is not exactly new--Dowd manages to produce a fair share of bons mots. To wit, this pearl on the subject of plastic surgery and men: "I have yet to see a man come out of cosmetic surgery without looking transformed into some permanently astonished lesbian version of himself," Dowd quotes a source as saying. "It's terrifying. My friend's father had just his eyes done by the best, most highly sought-after cosmetic surgeon in New York City. And he doesn't look refreshed or well rested. He looks like he's being stabbed to death by invisible people." Dowd's generously dispersed anecdotes, though seldom as funny, are equally readable. In the end, though, one wishes "Are Men Necessary?" went beyond simply grocery listing examples of sexual disparity to offer concrete suggestions for change. Then again, maybe that's too great a task even for a woman like Dowd. "--Kim Hughes"


Author: Modris Eksteins
Publisher: Mariner Books
Release: 2000
Summary: Dazzling in its originality, witty and perceptive in unearthing patterns of behavior that history has erased, RITES OF SPRING probes the origins, the impact, and the aftermath of World War I -- from the premiere of Stravinsky's ballet The Rite of Spring in 1913 to the death of Hitler in 1945. "The Great War," as Modris Eksteins writes, "was the psychological turning point . . . for modernism as a whole. The urge to create and the urge to destroy had changed places." In this "bold and fertile book" (Atlantic Monthly), Eksteins goes on to chart the seismic shifts in human consciousness brought about by this great cataclysm through the lives and words of ordinary people, works of literature, and such events as Lindbergh's transatlantic flight and the publication of the first modern bestseller, ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT. RITES OF SPRING is a remarkable and rare work, a cultural history that redefines the way we look at our past and toward our future.

Author: Adolf Hitler
Publisher: Mariner Books
Release: 1998
Summary: The angry ranting of an obscure, small-party politician, the first volume of "Mein Kampf" was virtually ignored when it was originally published in 1925. Likewise the second volume, which appeared in 1926. The book details Hitler's childhood, the "betrayal" of Germany in World War I, the desire for revenge against France, the need for "lebensraum" for the German people, and the means by which the National Socialist party can gain power. It also includes Hitler's racist agenda and his glorification of the "Aryan" race. The few outside the Nazi party who read it dismissed it as nonsense, not believing that anyone could--or would--carry out its radical, terrorist programs. As Hitler and the Nazis gained power, first party members and then the general public were pressured to buy the book. By the time Hitler became chancellor of the Third Reich in 1933, the book stood atop the German bestseller lists. Had the book been taken seriously when it was first published, perhaps the 20th century would have been very different.
Beyond the anger, hatred, bigotry, and self-aggrandizing, "Mein Kampf" is saddled with tortured prose, meandering narrative, and tangled metaphors (one person was described as "a thorn in the eyes of venal officials"). That said, it is an incredibly important book. It is foolish to think that the Holocaust could not happen again, especially if World War II and its horrors are forgotten. As an Amazon.com reader has pointed out, "If you want to learn about why the Holocaust happened, you can't avoid reading the words of the man who was most responsible for it happening." "Mein Kampf", therefore, must be read as a reminder that evil can all too easily grow. "--Sunny Delaney"


Author: Edward W. Said
Publisher: Vintage
Release: 1979
Summary: The noted critic and a Palestinian now teaching at Columbia University,examines the way in which the West observes the Arabs.

Author: Robert F. Berkhofer
Publisher: Vintage
Release: 1979
Summary: Robert Berkhofer writes in his excellent book (The White Man's Indian: Images of the American Indian from Columbus to the Present), the discourse of "Indian-ness" is a Euro-American construction. Indigenous peoples of the Americas did not think of themselves as belonging to some unified group of "Indians" or "Native Americans." That was a Columbus invention and like they say, the rest is history. Conversely, aboriginal peoples deemed themselves Dineh (Navajo) or Nuche (Utes), but certainly not "Indians." The category of "Indian" is an error of geography.

The Euro-American construction of a pan-Indian concept and "lumping" all tribes together led to tragedy on a grand scale. Some children from one group (or tribe) would steal a couple of cows from a wagon train. A few days later, miles down the trail, other "Indians" might appear. The white pioneers would shoot in retribution for the theft - firing at people who had nothing to do with it, and indeed, at people who might well have been glad to join in a raid against the tribe that had committed the theft. The lack of complexity is something the dominant White Euro-American culture had been prepared for is one of Berkhofers arguments. Berkhofer presents his case and does this with a list of examples and scholarly deftness to make it obvious and easy to relate to.

The problem was ignorance but more importantly, it was based upon an agenda of Otherness. "They" are not like "Us". "They" are a threat to "Us". "We" need to make them good Americans. We don't really understand "Them" what is there to understand. The conception of Indian changes over time a classic example of an Episteme. Indicating that the conception of the "Indian" was really more an indication of how the White population saw themselves. The effects of oversimplification, lumping and misplaced sense of nationalism (which was really "Individualism") resulted in what was almost a complete physical destruction of not a cultural one. The white conception of "Indians" is racism, pure and simple - lumping together the large and very diverse peoples on the continent. Berhofer takes us there. For more information also see Celluloid Indian by Kilpatrick (also available on Amazon.com). Be prepared to see things in a different way.

Miguel Llora


Author: Laurens Van Der Post
Publisher: Vintage
Release: 1976
Summary: After World War II, still in uniform and having been in a Japanese POW camp, Van der Post arrived in Zurich where his wife was studying with Carl Jung's mistress, Toni Wolff. Van der Post met Jung and an unlikely friendship ensued, based at first on a common love of Africa (van der Post's native continent.) The book explores Jung the man with rich doses of Van der Post's own narrative and subjectivity. It is unusually vivid, non-analytic, yet deep. The era of the end of the War and emerging Cold War helps set Jung in a meaningful context. Van der Post resonates powerfully with Jung's emphasis on dreams, which seems surprising in a man of action, but the depth he achieves in exploring some of Jung's well-known dreams is rewarding. He also catches some of the man's faults and foibles, so the tone, while idealizing on the whole, has a convincing precision of detail. The two men, author and subject, share a deep passion for the religious (as well as similar Reformed roots) and so the reader is drawn into a passionate dialogue about good and evil, God, the collective unconscious, war, racism, and other fascinating themes of Jung's work. Van der Post illuminates Jung's work without getting into the scholarly or pedantic mode, and brings the world of Jung's time to bear on our understanding of the man and his work. In addition to Jung, other members of the Zurich coterie are portrayed with spirited appreciation. Highly recommended.

Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
Publisher: Vintage
Release: 1968
Summary: Represents a selection from Nietzche's notebooks to find out what he wrote on nihilism, art, morality, religion, and the theory of knowledge, among others.

Author: Bram Stoker
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1997
Summary: "Dracula" is one of the few horror books to be honored by inclusion in the Norton Critical Edition series. (The others are "Frankenstein," "The Turn of the Screw," "Heart of Darkness," "The Picture of Dorian Gray," and "The Metamorphosis.") This 100th-anniversary edition includes not only the complete authoritative text of the novel with illuminating footnotes, but also four contextual essays, five reviews from the time of publication, five articles on dramatic and film variations, and seven selections from literary and academic criticism. Nina Auerbach of the University of Pennsylvania (author of "Our Vampires, Ourselves") and horror scholar David J. Skal (author of "Hollywood Gothic", "The Monster Show", and "Screams of Reason") are the editors of the volume. Especially fascinating are excerpts from materials that Bram Stoker consulted in his research for the book, and his working papers over the several years he was composing it. The selection of criticism includes essays on how "Dracula" deals with female sexuality, gender inversion, homoerotic elements, and Victorian fears of "reverse colonization" by politically turbulent Transylvania.

Author: T. R. Malthus
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 2003
Summary: While millions face hunger, malnutrition, and starvation, the world's population is increasing by over 225,000 people per day, 80 million per year. In many countries, supplies of food and water are inadequate to support the population, so the world falls deeper and deeper into what economists call the "Malthusian trap," named for the writer whose work, more than any other, brought attention to the population dilemma. Philip Appleman's comprehensive introduction to Thomas Robert Malthus' seminal 1798 work traces the evolution of Malthus' idea and its validity through following generations.
The text is accompanied by explanatory annotations and excerpts from the revised edition (1803). Key eighteenth-century influences on Malthus are reprinted, including one by Benjamin Franklin.
Nine major assessments from the nineteenth century are reprinted, including—new to the Second Edition—those of Frances Pace and Harriet Martineau.
Contemporary commentary ranges widely through many schools of thought, from Lester R. Brown, Paul and Anne Ehrlich, and Garrett Hardin to Julian Simon and Pope Paul VI. All but one of the twenty-four selections are new to the Second Edition.
About the series: No other series of classic texts equals the caliber of the Norton Critical Editions. Each volume combines the most authoritative text available with the comprehensive pedagogical apparatus necessary to appreciate the work fully. Careful editing, first-rate translation, and thorough explanatory annotations allow each text to meet the highest literary standards while remaining accessible to students. Each edition is printed on acid-free paper and every text in the series remains in print. Norton Critical Editions are the choice for excellence in scholarship for students at more than 2,000 universities worldwide.


Author: Jill Freedman, Gene Combs
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1996
Summary: Narrative Therapy by Jill Freedman & Gene Combs is perhaps one of the best theraputic books I have read. As an author and human services worker, I am always looking for titles that will help me assist client's with their needs. That said, this book is a must read for anyone who wants to work through problems such as depression, anger and societal connections. I highly recommend this book - the authors did a great job!
---
John D. Moore, MS, CADC
Author of Confusing Love with Obsession


Author: Peter Gay
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1999
Summary: Education of the Senses, the first volume of Peter Gay's The Bourgeois Experience, was hailed as "a subtle, elegant, profound and prodigiously researched book" (Washington Post Book World), "the most learned, as well as the wittiest, survey of human sexuality ever to be published" (The New
York Times). In this, the second volume, Gay continues his eloquent, psychoanalytically informed exploration of the lives of the Victorian middle classes. Whereas Education of the Senses focused on Victorians' sexual behavior and attitudes, The Tender Passion concentrates on their notions of love.
Gay argues that, contrary to popular belief, Victorians were able to know love in its most exalted sense. "Freud was only summing up the current wisdom," he writes, "when he observed that 'a completely normal attitude in love' requires the uniting of 'two currents,' the 'tender and sensual.'"
Beginning with the stories of two young men, one English and one German, Gay proceeds to a wide-ranging inquiry into the ideal and real meaning of love for the Victorians. Based on a vast amount of material--including philosophical treatises, medical texts, letters, diaries, works of fiction,
and art--the book explores such topics as homosexual love, class differences in the perception of love, and the diversion of love in music and religion. There are also fascinating insights into the lives of eminent 19th-century figures, including Dickens, Stendhal, Balzac, Wagner, and Beatrice Webb.
A work of remarkable erudition and analytical sophistication, The Tender Passion is an impressive addition to "one of the major historical enterprises of the decade" (The New York Review of Books).


Author: Peter Gay
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1999
Summary: Education of the Senses, the first volume of Peter Gay's The Bourgeois Experience, was hailed as "a subtle, elegant, profound and prodigiously researched book" (Washington Post Book World), "the most learned, as well as the wittiest, survey of human sexuality ever to be published" (The New
York Times). In this, the second volume, Gay continues his eloquent, psychoanalytically informed exploration of the lives of the Victorian middle classes. Whereas Education of the Senses focused on Victorians' sexual behavior and attitudes, The Tender Passion concentrates on their notions of love.
Gay argues that, contrary to popular belief, Victorians were able to know love in its most exalted sense. "Freud was only summing up the current wisdom," he writes, "when he observed that 'a completely normal attitude in love' requires the uniting of 'two currents,' the 'tender and sensual.'"
Beginning with the stories of two young men, one English and one German, Gay proceeds to a wide-ranging inquiry into the ideal and real meaning of love for the Victorians. Based on a vast amount of material--including philosophical treatises, medical texts, letters, diaries, works of fiction,
and art--the book explores such topics as homosexual love, class differences in the perception of love, and the diversion of love in music and religion. There are also fascinating insights into the lives of eminent 19th-century figures, including Dickens, Stendhal, Balzac, Wagner, and Beatrice Webb.
A work of remarkable erudition and analytical sophistication, The Tender Passion is an impressive addition to "one of the major historical enterprises of the decade" (The New York Review of Books).


Author: Peter Gay
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1999
Summary: In uncovering the roots of modernism, a master historian shows us a hidden side of the Victorian era, the role of the bourgeois as reactionaries, revolutionaries, and middle-of-the-roaders in the passage of high culture toward modernism. "In the Victorian decades, the name bourgeois was at once a term of reproach and a source of self-respect." So Peter Gay opens his newest and perhaps most surprising work. For the Victorians we meet in this volume are not the stodgy, complacent characters of drawing-room comedy. They are instead a varied crowd, from the capitalists in the top tier of the bourgeoisie eager to be recognized as gentlemen or, better yet, dubbed as nobility to those at the bottom of the pile, the clerks and craftsmen mortally afraid of sinking into the mass of the proletariat. What they share is an anxiety, driven by their concern to advance up the social pyramid or at least to maintain the status they have achieved. Some of the individuals in this richly peopled narrative turn on their own class, none more bitterly than Gustave Flaubert; others celebrate their success, whether in Manchester or in Munich, by sponsoring symphony orchestras or establishing museums; still others become cultural hunters and gatherers, turning their newly acquired fortunes to the private accumulation of art, ranging from the "safe" works of the old masters to the daring innovations of the Impressionists. The stage is thus set for the explosion of modernism accompanied by an inevitable reaction against the subversive avant-garde of artists, composers, and writers as varied as Cezanne, Picasso, Stravinsky, Shaw, Ibsen, and Zola. No one reading this concluding volume of Peter Gay's magnificent revaluation of the nineteenth century will ever again use the term Victorian as a synonym for dull.
Pleasure Wars is the fifth and final volume in The Bourgeois Experience: Victoria to Freud, Peter Gay's searching inquiry into the ideas and sensibilities that dominated nineteenth-century culture. Richard Sennett, referring to the series as a whole, wrote that Peter Gay's "magisterial portrait of the Victorian bourgeoisie makes the past make emotional sense."


Author: Christopher Lasch
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1997
Summary: Around the turn of the century, the American liberal tradition made a major shift away from politics. The new radicals were more interested in the reform of education, culture, and sexual mores. Through vivid biographies, Christopher Lasch chronicles these social reformers from Jane Addams, Mabel Dodge Luhan, and Lincoln Steffens to Norman Mailer and Dwight MacDonald.

Author: Peter Gay
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1996
Summary: Education of the Senses, the first volume of Peter Gay's The Bourgeois Experience, was hailed as "a subtle, elegant, profound and prodigiously researched book" (Washington Post Book World), "the most learned, as well as the wittiest, survey of human sexuality ever to be published" (The New
York Times). In this, the second volume, Gay continues his eloquent, psychoanalytically informed exploration of the lives of the Victorian middle classes. Whereas Education of the Senses focused on Victorians' sexual behavior and attitudes, The Tender Passion concentrates on their notions of love.
Gay argues that, contrary to popular belief, Victorians were able to know love in its most exalted sense. "Freud was only summing up the current wisdom," he writes, "when he observed that 'a completely normal attitude in love' requires the uniting of 'two currents,' the 'tender and sensual.'"
Beginning with the stories of two young men, one English and one German, Gay proceeds to a wide-ranging inquiry into the ideal and real meaning of love for the Victorians. Based on a vast amount of material--including philosophical treatises, medical texts, letters, diaries, works of fiction,
and art--the book explores such topics as homosexual love, class differences in the perception of love, and the diversion of love in music and religion. There are also fascinating insights into the lives of eminent 19th-century figures, including Dickens, Stendhal, Balzac, Wagner, and Beatrice Webb.
A work of remarkable erudition and analytical sophistication, The Tender Passion is an impressive addition to "one of the major historical enterprises of the decade" (The New York Review of Books).


Author: Peter Gay
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1993
Summary: [...] This five volume history of the victorian bourgeois follows a freudian schematic: the first volume dealt with love, the second with sex, and this volume with agression.

This book was my favorite of the three I've read so far. Gay picks apart the Victorian penchant for cloaked agression with admirable scholastic fortitude. His discussion of Foucault's theory of prisons is a high light for this entire five volume set.

His critique of what he calls the "social control" theorists is that they fail to take into account the ability of the powerful to delude themselves into thinking they are doing the right thing, even when they are most assuredly not.

Why stop here? Only two more volumes to go...


Author: Christopher Lasch
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1991
Summary: When "The Culture of Narcissism" was first published, it was clear that Christopher Lasch had identified something important: what was happening to American society in the wake of the decline of the family over the last century. The book quickly became a bestseller. This edition includes a new afterword, "The Culture of Narcissim Revisited."

Author: Will Eisner, Umberto Eco
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 2005
Summary: A work more disturbing than fiction from "the father of graphic novels" ("New York Times").
Will Eisner, the great American master of comics, has undertaken what he regards as his most powerful work yet. "The Plot" examines the outrageous fabrication of "The Protocols of the Elders of Zion", which purports to be the actual blueprint by Jewish leaders to take over the world. Hatched as an anti-Semitic plot by the tsar's secret police to deflect widespread criticism of the government, the "Protocols", first published in 1905, succeeded beyond the propagandistic ambitions of its originators; the lie became an internationally accepted truth. Presenting a pageant of historical figures including Tsar Nicholas II, Henry Ford, and Adolf Hitler, Eisner exposes the twisted history of the "Protocols" from nineteenth-century Russia to modern-day Klan members to Islamic fundamentalists. "The Plot" unravels one of the most devastating hoaxes of the twentieth century.


Author: Roy Porter
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 2000
Summary: Traditionally, "The Enlightenment" has been associated with France, America, and Scotland rather than Britain, which, strangely enough, is thought not to have had an Enlightenment to speak of. Roy Porter effectively upsets this view in "Enlightenment: Britain and the Creation of the Modern World". Porter's general concern is with "the interplay of activists, ideas, and society," and to this end he examines innovations in social, political, scientific, psychological, and theological discourse. The key figures (the "enlightened thinkers") read like a "Who's Who" of the 17th and 18th centuries--Newton, Locke, Bernard de Mandeville, Erasmus Darwin, Priestley, Paine, Bentham, and Britain's "premier enlightenment couple" Mary Wollstonecraft and William Godwin, as well as the men who helped popularize and disseminate their ideas, such as Addison, Steele, Defoe, Pope, and Sterne. The book is peppered with brilliant quotes, and although it covers such vast ground in a rapid and sometimes breathless manner, Porter just about manages to hold it all together.
While returning the Enlightenment to Britain, Porter also provides a persuasive general defense of the movement against its Foucauldian, feminist, and/or postmodern critics who still "paint it black." It was perpetually dismissed as "anything from superficial and intellectually naïve to a conspiracy of dead white men in periwigs [who] provide the intellectual foundation for Western imperialism," and one of the book's strengths is that after reading it, one finds it hard to understand how these "critiques" gained such influence in intellectual circles. The major shortcoming of the book--as Porter is well aware--is that "too many themes receive short measure": literature and the arts, political debate, the forging of nationalism, and more. Several chapters, if not all, deserved book-length treatment, making this work of nearly 500 pages seem quite short. But if "Enlightenment" leaves the reader unsatisfied, it is in the best possible way--one would have liked to hear more from Porter rather than less. Word has it he's already planning an encore. "--Larry Brown, Amazon.co.uk"


Author: Sigmund Freud, James Strachey
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
Release: 1989
Summary: Of the various English translations of Freud's major works to appear in his lifetime, only one was authorized by Freud himself: "The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud" under the general editorship of James Strachey. Freud approved the overall editorial plan, specific renderings of key words and phrases, and the addition of valuable notes, from bibliographical and explanatory. Many of the translations were done by Strachey himself; the rest were prepared under his supervision. The result was to place the Standard Edition in a position of unquestioned supremacy over all other existing versions.

Newly designed in a uniform format, each new paperback in the Standard Edition opens with a biographical essay on Freud's life and work—along with a note on the individual volume—by Peter Gay, Sterling Professor of History at Yale.


Author: Dan Brown
Publisher: DoubleDay
Release: 2003
Summary: With "The Da Vinci Code," Dan Brown masterfully concocts an intelligent and lucid thriller that marries the gusto of an international murder mystery with a collection of fascinating esoteria culled from 2,000 years of Western history.
A murder in the silent after-hour halls of the Louvre museum reveals a sinister plot to uncover a secret that has been protected by a clandestine society since the days of Christ. The victim is a high-ranking agent of this ancient society who, in the moments before his death, manages to leave gruesome clues at the scene that only his granddaughter, noted cryptographer Sophie Neveu, and Robert Langdon, a famed symbologist, can untangle. The duo become both suspects and detectives searching for not only Neveu's grandfather's murderer but also the stunning secret of the ages he was charged to protect. Mere steps ahead of the authorities and the deadly competition, the mystery leads Neveu and Langdon on a breathless flight through France, England, and history itself. Brown ("Angels and Demons") has created a page-turning thriller that also provides an amazing interpretation of Western history. Brown's hero and heroine embark on a lofty and intriguing exploration of some of Western culture's greatest mysteries--from the nature of the Mona Lisa's smile to the secret of the Holy Grail. Though some will quibble with the veracity of Brown's conjectures, therein lies the fun. "The Da Vinci Code" is an enthralling read that provides rich food for thought. "--Jeremy Pugh"


Author: Joseph Campbell, Bill Moyers
Publisher: Anchor
Release: 1991
Summary: Among his many gifts, Joseph Campbell's most impressive was the unique ability to take a contemporary situation, such as the murder and funeral of President John F. Kennedy, and help us understand its impact in the context of ancient mythology. Herein lies the power of "The Power of Myth", showing how humans are apt to create and live out the themes of mythology. Based on a six-part PBS television series hosted by Bill Moyers, this classic is especially compelling because of its engaging question-and-answer format, creating an easy, conversational approach to complicated and esoteric topics. For example, when discussing the mythology of heroes, Campbell and Moyers smoothly segue from the Sumerian sky goddess Inanna to "Star Wars"' mercenary-turned-hero, Han Solo. Most impressive is Campbell's encyclopedic knowledge of myths, demonstrated in his ability to recall the details and archetypes of almost any story, from any point and history, and translate it into a lesson for spiritual living in the here and now. "--Gail Hudson"

Author: Kurt Vonnegut
Publisher: The Dial Press
Release: 1998
Summary: This collection of Vonnegut's short masterpieces share his audacious sense of humor and extraordinary creative vision.

Author: Zecharia Sitchin
Publisher: Harper
Release: 1999
Summary: Zecharia Sitchin's Earth Chronicles series is based on the premise that mythology is not physiologically based, psychologically metaphorical, or culturally allegorical but rather the repository of ancient memories, and that the Bible ought to be read as a historical scientific document. While the debate regarding the origins of myth is far from conclusive, and the dangers of assuming that the subjectivity of the reader/researcher will not intervene are obvious, Stitchin "is" an expert in ancient language and history. While the reader may scoff at his unfortunately characteristic long leaps of logic resulting in conclusions (such as that gods from outer space destroyed a spaceport on the Sinai Peninsula four millennia ago), he does present some compelling ideas not easily ignored. The series, of which this is the third volume, deserves a read by those fascinated with the search for the origins of humankind who don't mind spending time separating wheat from chaff. "--P. Randall Cohan"

Author: Randall Kennedy
Publisher: Vintage
Release: 2003
Summary: "Nigger" is Harvard law professor Randall Kennedy's ornate, lively monograph on what he calls the "paradigmatic" racial slur in the English language. A neutral noun in the 17th century, "nigger" had, by 1830, become an "influential" insult. Kennedy traces the word's history in literature, song, film, politics, sports, everyday speech, and the courtroom. He also discusses its plastic, contradictory, and volatile place in contemporary American society. Should it be eradicated from dictionaries and the language? Should it be, somehow, regulated? What is the significance of its emergence among some blacks as a term with "undertones of warmth and good will"? Do blacks have a historical right to its use or does that place the term under a "protectionist pall"? With courage and grave measure Kennedy has, in effect, created a forum for discussion of the word he calls a "reminder of the ironies and dilemmas, the tragedies and glories, of the American experience." "--H. O'Billovitch"

Author: Harry Bruinius
Publisher: Knopf
Release: 2006
Summary: In "Better for All the World," Harry Bruinius charts the little-known history of eugenics in America—a movement that began in the early twentieth century and resulted in the forced sterilization of more than 65,000 Americans.

Bruinius tells the stories of Emma and Carrie Buck, two women trapped in poverty and caught up in a new scientific quest for racial purity. "Buck v. Bell" became a test case brought before the Supreme Court, which voted 8–1 to make sterilization a constitutionally valid way for the state to prevent anyone deemed “unfit” from having children.

The court’s majority opinion was written by Oliver Wendell Holmes: “It is better for all the world,” Holmes wrote, “if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind. The principle that sustains compulsory vaccination is broad enough to cover cutting the Fallopian tubes. . . . Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”

Eugenicists believed that the human race must begin to take control not just of human reproduction, but of ethnic intermingling. With the natural and objective methods of science they hoped to breed only the biologically best of the races and prevent the propagation of the worst. The result: marriage restriction, anti-miscegenation, and immigration laws.

In "Better for All the World," Harry Bruinius shows how reformers across the nation transformed haphazard, locally run systems of charity and welfare—mostly church handouts and town asylums—into government-run systems of welfare that aspired to make America a place where social and moral purity could reign, free from the “hereditary defectives” of the past.

Those who supported the programs included Theodore Roosevelt; Margaret Sanger; Alexander Graham Bell; the heads of the Harriman, Carnegie, and Rockefeller foundations; and scholars from Harvard, Yale, and Stanford.

Bruinius writes how many of the leaders of the eugenics movement were New England Protestants who used an evangelical tone that harked back to their Puritan forebears, and who proclaimed their goal to keep the “American stock” pure by excising the causes of immoral behavior.

Drawing on personal letters, diaries, and documents never before used, the author writes of the three scientists who developed the theories and practices of eugenics: Francis Galton, cousin of Charles Darwin, who coined the word “eugenics” to describe the science of better breeding; Charles Davenport, the first influential eugenic thinker in America, professor at Harvard University and the University of Chicago, direct descendant of Reverend John Davenport, the founder of the city of New Haven; and Harry Laughlin, Davenport’s protégé, the nation’s foremost expert in eugenic sterilization and also a leader in the movement to stop the tide of immigrants coming to this country.

The author makes clear how America’s quest for racial purity influenced Nazi Germany: one of its first laws, the Prevention of Genetically Diseased Offspring, followed the work of California’s Human Betterment Foundation and Harry Laughlin’s Model Law. In less than two years, more than 150,000 German citizens were sterilized, preparing the way for the genocide to come. In 1936, the Nazi regime awarded Laughlin an honorary doctorate from Heidelberg University for his contributions to “racial hygiene.” During the Nuremberg Trials, the Allied prosecutors were doubtful they could convict Nazi doctors of “crimes against humanity”—since those accused had carried out acts based on theories of eugenics that had been practiced for decades in the United States.


Author: Sharon Gannon, David Life
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Release: 2002
Summary: "The long-awaited," "complete guide to the popular, vigorous American method of yoga that is deeply rooted in ancient wisdom and scriptures
"
“In this day and age of health and fitness trends, it is assuring to know that Sharon and David encourage their students to draw inspiration from the classical texts of Yoga and timeless scriptural sources. What I appreciate so much about David and Sharon is how they help their Yoga students to understand and appreciate the wisdom of all the great saints and jivamuktas who have contributed to raising consciousness. Ultimately, it is Self-Realization, that is the true goal of Yoga.”
–SRI SWAMI SATCHIDANANDA

Creators of the extremely popular Jivamukti Yoga method and cofounders of the New York City studios where it is taught, Sharon Gannon and David Life present their unique style of yoga for the first time in book form. As they explain their intensely physical and spiritual system of flowing postures, they provide inspiring expert instruction to guide you in your practice.

Unlike many books about yoga, "Jivamukti Yoga" focuses not only on the physical postures but also on how they evolved–the origins of the practices in yoga’s ancient sacred texts and five-thousand-year-old traditions–the psychotherapeutic benefits that accrue with a steady practice, and the spiritual power that is set free when energy flows throughout the mind and body. Jivamukti Yoga, which means “soul liberation,” guides your body and soul into spiritual freedom, physical strength, peace of mind, better health, and Self-realization–the ultimate goal of any practice. Gannon and Life help you understand each of the practices that comprise the yoga path to enlightenment:
AHIMSA–"The Way of Compassion": choosing nonviolence, respecting all life, practicing vegetarianism, living free of prejudice
ASANA–"The Way of Connection to the Earth": postures and sequences, breathing, transforming energy, understanding the bandhas
KARMA–"The Way of Action": creating good karma, giving thanks
NADAM–"The Way of Sacred Music": appreciating the sacred sounds of yoga
MEDITATION–"The Way of the Witness": how to sit still and move inward
BHAKTI–"The Way of Devotion to God": living with love, grace, and peace

Whatever yoga you practice, "Jivamukti Yoga" will help you to strengthen and deepen that practice and lead you onto a path of spiritual clarity and self-discovery.

“If there is only one book you read about the practice of Yoga, this should be the one. Sharon and David are deeply dedicated students and teachers of Yoga who have the rare capacity to translate their profound understanding to the reader. This book is for anyone who wishes to find transformation through Yoga. I’m grateful for their work and teaching.”
–STEPHAN RECHTSCHAFFEN, MD
Co-founder & CEO, Omega Institute


Author: Umberto Eco
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Release: 1990
Summary: "As brilliant and quirky as THE NAME OF THE ROSE, as mischievous and wide-raning....A virtuoso performance."
THE SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
Three clever book editors, inspired by an extraordinary fable they heard years befoe, decide to have a little fun. Randomly feeding esoteric bits of knowledge into an incredible computer capable of inventing connections between all their entires, they think they are creating a long lazy game--until the game starts taking over....
Here is an incredible journey of thought and history, memory and fantasy, a tour de force as enthralling as anything Umberto Eco--or indeed anyone--has ever devised.


Author: Hyemeyohsts Storm
Publisher: Ballantine Books
Release: 1985
Summary: A heartbreaking story of victory, defeat, and of a spiritual search in a profane world, this is the story of Night Bear and his people. It is the tale of the land they cherish and the lives they hold sacred, lived until the enemy can no longer be stopped, and the dead have few left to weep for them.

Author: Angelique Richardson
Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan
Release: 2002
Summary: A cultural icon of the "fin de siècle", the New Woman was not one figure, but several. In the guise of a bicycling, cigarette-smoking Amazon, the New Woman romped through the pages of "Punch" and popular fiction; as a neurasthenic victim of social oppression, she suffered in the pages of New Woman novels such as Sarah Grand's hugely successful" The Heavenly Twins". "The New Woman in Fiction and Fact" marks a radically new departure in 19th century scholarship to explore the polyvocal nature of the late Victorian debates around gender, motherhood, class, race and imperialism which converged in the name of the New Woman.


Author: E. A. Swingrover
Publisher: Longman
Release: 2003
Summary: "The Counterculture Reader" provides a fascinating look at American culture in the 60's". This brief collection of readings presents an engaging and informed overview of the counterculture movement, challenging students to understand “what happened and why.” Brief apparatus helps individuals read and write more thoughtfully about the idea of counterculture and think critically about its effects on contemporary culture. Individuals interested in reading selections about the counterculture movement of the 1960's. Swingrover The_Counterculture_Reader SMP Page 1 of 1

Author: William Sears, Martha Sears, Robert Sears, James Sears
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Release: 2003
Summary: In their excellent (and hefty) resource guide, "The Baby Book," attachment parenting specialists William Sears and Martha Sears have provided new parents with their approach to every aspect of baby care basics, from newborns to toddlers. Attachment parenting is a gentle, reasonable approach to parenting that stresses bonding with your baby, responding to her cues, breastfeeding, "wearing" your baby, and sharing sleep with your child. For those parents who worry about negative effects of this attention, the Sears say, "Spoiling is what happens when you leave something (or some person) alone on the shelf--it spoils."

Author: Malcolm Gladwell
Publisher: Back Bay Books
Release: 2002
Summary: "The best way to understand the dramatic transformation of unknown books into bestsellers, or the rise of teenage smoking, or the phenomena of word of mouth or any number of the other mysterious changes that mark everyday life," writes Malcolm Gladwell, "is to think of them as epidemics. Ideas and products and messages and behaviors spread just like viruses do." Although anyone familiar with the theory of memetics will recognize this concept, Gladwell's "The Tipping Point" has quite a few interesting twists on the subject.
For example, Paul Revere was able to galvanize the forces of resistance so effectively in part because he was what Gladwell calls a "Connector": he knew just about everybody, particularly the revolutionary leaders in each of the towns that he rode through. But Revere "wasn't just the man with the biggest Rolodex in colonial Boston," he was also a "Maven" who gathered extensive information about the British. He knew what was going on and he knew exactly whom to tell. The phenomenon continues to this day--think of how often you've received information in an e-mail message that had been forwarded at least half a dozen times before reaching you.
Gladwell develops these and other concepts (such as the "stickiness" of ideas or the effect of population size on information dispersal) through simple, clear explanations and entertainingly illustrative anecdotes, such as comparing the pedagogical methods of "Sesame Street" and "Blue's Clues", or explaining why it would be even easier to play Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon with the actor Rod Steiger. Although some readers may find the transitional passages between chapters hold their hands a little too tightly, and Gladwell's closing invocation of the possibilities of social engineering sketchy, even chilling, "The Tipping Point" is one of the most effective books on science for a general audience in ages. It seems inevitable that "tipping point," like "future shock" or "chaos theory," will soon become one of those ideas that everybody knows--or at least knows by name. "--Ron Hogan"


Author: Deirdre Bair
Publisher: Back Bay Books
Release: 2004
Summary: Deirdre Bair has written about some of the most influential figures in 20th century culture-Samuel Beckett, Simone de Beauvoir, and Anas Nin. Now she turns her expert eye to the one person whose teachings and writings are the most influential of all: psychoanalyst Carl Gustav Jung. The founder of analytical psychology, Jung became the first president of the International Psychoanalytic Association in 1910. Jung had a professional relationship with Sigmund Freud until he broke with the elder father of psychoanalysis over his emphasis on infantile sexuality and the Oedipus complex.As Freud's influence has waned over the years, Jung's ideas-the collective unconscious, the archetypal myths underpinning all societies, synchronicity, 'new age' spirituality, and much more-have achieved an overwhelming ascendancy.Bair addresses the myths about Jung-accusations that he was an anti-Semite and a misogynist, and that he falsified data-with evidence from his own writings and from those of his colleagues and former patients. The result is a groundbreaking and accessible work that promises to be the definitive life of Carl Jung.

Author: Ruth Clifford Engs
Publisher: Greenwood Press
Release: 2005
Summary: Eugenics--the theory that we can improve future generations of humans through selective breeding--was one of the most controversial movements of the early 20th century. Often tied to racist beliefs and nativist desires to limit immigration, the eugenics movement attracted some of the most prominent scientists and social reformers of the day. This encyclopedia brings into one place concise descriptions of the leading figures, organizations, events, legislation, publications, concepts, and terms of this vitally important period historical movement. Although focused on the United States during the heyday of the movement, the encyclopedia includes material on international event as well as connections to important contemporary issues such as genetic engineering, "family balancing," and the possibility of human cloning.

Author: Shadia B. Drury
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Release: 1999
Summary: In 1980, Ronald Reagan was elected President of the United States for his first term, and the conservative revolution that was slowly developing in the United States finally emerged in full-throated roar. Who provoked the conservative revolution? Shadia Drury provides a fascinating answer to the question as she looks at the work of Leo Strauss, a seemingly reclusive German Jewish emigré and scholar who was one of the most influential individuals in the conservative movement, a man widely seen as the godfather of the Republican party's failed "Contract With America." Among his students were individuals such as Alan Bloom, author of The Closing of the American Mind. Strauss influenced the work of Irving Kristol, Gertrude Himmelfarb and William Kristol, as well as Chief Justice Clarence Thomas and Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich. Drury delves deeply into Strauss's work at the University of Chicago where he taught his students that, if they truly loved America, they must save her from her fateful enchantment with liberalism. Leo Strauss and the American Right is a fascinating piece of work that anyone interested in understanding our current political situation will want to read.

Author: Ellis Amburn
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
Release: 1999
Summary: At the heart of Jack Kerouac's hidden life is the conflict between his "homoerotically inclined life and the blustering masculinity" he felt compelled to demonstrate. As a youth in Lowell, Massachusetts, Kerouac was a football hero, brash and rowdy, pursued by the local coeds. But his strongest emotions focused on an artistic high school friend, Sammy Sampas, whose physical advances Jack ultimately rejected and forever mourned. This failure to resolve his emotional and sexual identity set into motion Kerouac's two-headed monster of creativity and self-destruction.
Though his novels depict rampant sexual freedom and distinguish him as a stylistic innovator, Kerouac himself was reined in by the taboos and social constrictions of the 1930s and '40s. Friendships with Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs, Neal Cassady, and other beat originals helped him indulge the homosexual side of his nature. Yet the internal conflicts raged, and running along with them were Kerouac's Benzedrine and alcohol addictions.
While Amburn's biography is rich with the salacious adventures of hipsterism (trysts with Ginsberg between parked trucks in Greenwich Village; the frenetic cross-country trips immortalized in "On the Road"; the Kerouac Sex List, which tells exactly with whom and how many times), he takes a serious look at the twisted Kerouac psyche. Amburn has a unique vantage point as Kerouac's last editor, and we benefit from their friendship with the confidential details Kerouac supplied during the editing process. Kerouac often insisted that "every word I write is true," but Amburn readers discover a man tortured by the dueling sides of his own divided nature. "--Joan Urban"


Author: D. J. Waldie
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
Release: 1997
Summary: Welcome to Lakewood, California, the world's largest suburb and the subject of an oddly mesmerizing account of its creation by D. J. Waldie. Waldie describes how bean fields were drawn up, sectioned off and divided up--leaving tracts for small houses of similar design. The author changes while the land around him does, in a story of how people make places and, more so, places make people.

Author: Henry James
Publisher: Bedford Books
Release: 1995
Summary: The story starts conventionally enough with friends sharing ghost stories 'round the fire on Christmas Eve. One of the guests tells about a governess at a country house plagued by supernatural visitors. But in the hands of Henry James, the master of nuance, this little tale of terror is an exquisite gem of sexual and psychological ambiguity. Only the young governess can see the ghosts; only she suspects that the previous governess and her lover are controlling the two orphaned children (a girl and a boy) for some evil purpose. The household staff don't know what she's talking about, the children are evasive when questioned, and the master of the house (the children's uncle) is absent. Why does the young girl claim not to see a perfectly visible woman standing on the far side of the lake? Are the children being deceptive, or is the governess being paranoid? By leaving the questions unanswered, "The Turn of Screw" generates spine-tingling anxiety in its mesmerized readers.

Author: Osho
Publisher: Harmony
Release: 2006
Summary: The path to freedom is filled with questions and uncertainty. Is it possible to truly know who we are? Do our lives have a purpose, or are we just accidental? What are we meant to contribute? What are we meant to become, to create, and to share? In "The Book of Understanding", Osho, one of the most provocative thinkers of our time, challenges us to understand our world and ourselves in a new and radical way. The first step toward understanding, he says, is to question and doubt all that we have been taught to believe.

All our lives we’ve been handed so-called truths by countless others—beliefs we learned to accept without reason. It is only in questioning our beliefs, assumptions, and prejudices that we can begin to uncover our own unique voice and heal the divisions within us and without.

Once we discover our authentic self, we can embrace all aspects of the human experience—from the earthy, pleasure-loving qualities that characterize Zorba the Greek to the watchful, silent qualities of Gautam the Buddha. We can become whole and live with integrity, able to respond with creativity and compassion to the religious, political, and cultural divides that currently plague our society.

In this groundbreaking work, Osho identifies, loosens, and ultimately helps to untie the knots of fear and misunderstanding that restrict us—leaving us free to discover and create our own individual path to freedom.



Doubt—because doubt is not a sin, it is the sign of your intelligence.

You are not responsible to any nation, to any church, to any God. You are responsible only for one thing, and that is self-knowledge. And the miracle is, if you can fulfill this responsibility, you will be able to fulfill many other responsibilities without any effort. The moment you come to your own being, a revolution happens in your vision. Your whole outlook about life goes through a radical change. You start feeling new responsibilities—not as something to be done, not as duty to be fulfilled, but as a joy to do. —OSHO


Author: David Standish
Publisher: Perseus Books Group
Release: 2006
Summary: A remarkable cultural history of what might exist under the Earth's surface—as reflected in mythology, religion, science, literature, and good old crackpottery. Beliefs in mysterious underworlds are as old as humanity. But the idea that the earth has a hollow interior was first proposed as a scientific theory in 1691 by Sir Edmond Halley (of comet fame), who also suggested that there might be life down there as well. Hollow Earth traces the many surprising, marvelous, and just plain weird permutations his ideas have taken over the centuries.Both Edgar Allan Poe and (more famously) Jules Verne picked up the torch in the nineteenth century, the latter with his science fiction epic A Journey to the Center of the Earth. The notion of a hollow earth even inspired a religion at the turn of the twentieth century—Koreshanity, which held not only that the earth was hollow, but also that we're all living on the inside.Utopian novels and adventures abounded at this same time, including L. Frank Baum's hollow earth addition to the Oz series and Edgar Rice Burroughs's Pellucidar books chronicling a stone-age hollow earth. In the 1940s an enterprising science-fiction magazine editor convinced people that the true origins of flying saucers lay within the hollow earth, relics of an advanced alien civilization. And there are still devout hollow earthers today, some of whom claim there is a New Age utopia lurking beneath the earth's surface, with at least one entrance near Mt. Shasta in California. Hollow Earth travels through centuries and cultures, exploring how each era's relationship to the idea of a hollow earth mirrored its hopes, fears, and values. Illustrated with everything from seventeenth-century maps to 1950s pulp art to movie posters and more, Hollow Earth is for anyone interested in the history of strange ideas that just won't go away.

Author: Anne Norton
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 2005
Summary: The teachings of political theorist Leo Strauss (1899–1973) have recently received new attention, as political observers have become aware of the influence Strauss’s students have had in shaping conservative agendas of the Bush administration—including the war on Iraq. This provocative book examines Strauss’s ideas and the ways in which they have been appropriated, or misappropriated, by senior policymakers.
Anne Norton, a political theorist trained by some of Strauss’s most famous students, is well equipped to write on Strauss and Straussians. She tells three interwoven narratives: the story of Leo Strauss, a Jewish German-born émigré, who carried European philosophy into a new world; the story of the philosophic lineage that came from Leo Strauss; and the story of how America has been made a moral battleground by the likes of Paul Wolfowitz, Leon Kass, Carnes Lord, and Irving Kristol—Straussian conservatives committed to an American imperialism they believe will usher in a new world order.


Author: Mark Oppenheimer
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 2003
Summary: What happened to American religion during the cultural revolution of the 1960s and early 1970s? The era has long been associated with the ascendancy of Eastern religions and fringe cults. But in this provocative book, Mark Oppenheimer demonstrates that contrary to conventional wisdom, most Americans did not turn on, tune in, and drop out of mainstream religious groups during the Age of Aquarius. Instead, many Americans brought the counterculture with them to their churches and temples, changing the face of American religion. Introducing us to America's first gay ministers and first female priests, to hippie Jews and folk-singing Catholics, Oppenheimer demonstrates that this was an era of extraordinary religious vitality. Drawing on a rich range of archival material as well as interviews with many of the protagonists, Knocking on Heaven's Door offers a wry and iconoclastic reappraisal of the ways in which the upheavals of the sixties changed America's relationship with God.

Author: Sydney E. Ahlstrom
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 2004
Summary: This classic work, winner of the 1973 National Book Award in Philosophy and Religion and "Christian Century’s "choice "as the Religious Book of the Decade (1979), is now issued with a new chapter by noted religious historian David Hall, who carries the story of American religious history forward to the present day.
Praise for the earlier edition:
“An unusual and praiseworthy book. . . . It takes a modern, almost anthropological view of history, in which worship is a part of a web of culture along with play, love, dress, and language.”—B.A. Weisberger, "Washington Post Book World "

“The most detailed, most polished of the works in its tradition.”—Martin E. Marty, "New York Times Book Review "

“An intellectual delight that one does not so much read as savor.”—"America"

“The definitive one-volume study by the leading authority.”—"Christianity Today"

“No one writing or thinking hereafter about America’s past will be able to ignore Ahlstrom’s magisterial account of the religious element.”—"American Historical Review "



Author: J. W. Burrow
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 2000
Summary: This elegantly written book explores the history of ideas in Europe from the revolutions of 1848 to the beginning of the first World War. Distinguished historian J.W. Burrow populates his book with the great thinkers of the age -- among them Mill, Bakunin, Nietzsche, Proust, Flaubert, Wagner and Wilde -- and explores the impact on European intellectual life of such powerful scientific and social concepts as social Darwinism and the unconscious mind.

Author: Daniel Pick
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 2000
Summary: From the immediate success of George Du Maurier's 1894 book Trilby came a transatlantic sensation of all things Trilby- sausages, hats, candies, even a town in Florida. Trilby has faded now, leaving behind in its wake pervasive lingering traces of Svengali, the dark character who crossed from his role as a charismatic Jewish musician who hypnotised and exploited a young woman, into a cultural icon of all things concealed, sinister, and malignantly persuasive. Using Trilby as the starting point for an exploration of cultural history Pick analyses the Trilby phenomenon, and explores what it was about the themes of the book that resonated so immediately and widely with the deep psychological dreads of fin de siecle society and beyond. Guiding us through the smoke-and-mirrors world of 19th century neurologists and anti-semites, best-selling novelists, Jewish conductors enthralling divas, and political nightmares, Pick unearths representations of Svengali in literature, theatre, film, music and politics to reveal the constituents of post-modern angst. This is a short book, immaculately written, and thick with allusion and revelation.

Author: Philip J. Deloria
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 1999
Summary: This provocative book explores the way non-Indian Americans have appropriated Indian dress and acted out Indian roles since the Boston Tea Party-and the reactions of Indian people to these imitations of their native dress, language, and ritual. The author shows that white ideas about Indians have shaped national identity at different times in American history, and that Indians have been both idealized and villainized, humiliated and empowered, by these imaginings.

Author: Elzbieta Ettinger
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 1997
Summary: This book is the first to tell in detail the story of the passionate and secret love affair between two of the most prominent philosophers of the twentieth century, Hannah Arendt and Martin Heidegger. Drawing on their previously unknown correspondence, Elzbieta Ettinger describes a relationship that lasted for more than half a century, a relationship that sheds startling light on both individuals.

Author: Robin Winks
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 1996
Summary: This highly acclaimed book-now reissued with a new preface-investigates the underlying bonds between the world of the university and the intelligence community. The CIA and its World War II forerunner, the Office of Strategic Services, for years recruited primarily from the Ivy League. Robin Winks explains why this happened and introduces a fascinating cast of spy game participants.

Author: Matthew Arnold
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 1994
Summary: Without the challenging precedent of Culture and Anarchy, literary criticism and sociology in England and the United States would want both purpose and direction. Manifesting the special intelligence of a literary critic of original gifts, Culture and Anarchy is still a living classic. It is addressed to the flexible and the disinterested, to those who are not committed to the findings of their particular discipline, and it assumes in its reader a critical intelligence that will begin its work with the reader himself. Arnold employs a delicate and stringent irony in an examination of the society of his time: a rapidly expanding industrial society, just beginning to accustom itself to the changes in its institutions that the pace of its own development called for. Coming virtually at the end of the decade (1868) and immediately prior to W. E. Forster's Education Act, Culture and Anarchy phrases with a particular cogency the problems that find their centre in the questions: what kind of life do we think individuals in mass societies should be assisted to lead? How may we best ensure that the quality of their living is not impoverished? Arnold applies himself to the detail of his time: to the case of Mr Smith 'who feared he would come to poverty and be eternally lost', to the Reform agitation, to the commercial values that working people were encouraged to respect, and to the limitations of even the best Rationalist intelligence. The degree of local reference is therefore high, but John Dover Wilson's introduction and notes to this edition supply valuable assistance to a reader fresh to the period.

Author: Adam Crabtree
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 1993
Summary: I've been reading on the topic of hypnosis for about 15 years now, both formally and informally as far as education goes. In this book Adam Crabtree has given the best education on the topic I have ever encountered -- so much so, that I realized with some degree of horror how UNeducated I was about the subject, despite all these years of interest and study.
Crabtree does more than just present the yawningly-dull textbook aspect of history here -- HIS book IS an interesting read, despite being so educational. He also presents the personal, social and cultural dynamics that have played out throughout the history of this topic and with the personalities involved. The book gives important attention to the many qualified individuals who studied, practiced and wrote about the topic from Mesmer's era onward. Modern day authors and textbooks that cover the topic of hypnosis and related psychology tend to mostly-ignore anything more than a few decades old, with little more than a mention, as if only "modern" science is important (and there is always the unspoken inference in modern education that Mesmer, despite that he was well credentialed for his day, was some kind of idiot to go on about "magnetic fluid from the stars" and such).
What Crabtree demonstrates by unwinding the tapestry of this history is that by not paying more attention to the history, we have in fact failed to see what got lost in the politically correct shuffle of time, what got ignored in the West's attempt to find answers that could be explained solely by biochemical, and what got rewritten and UNwritten in the history which has been, as always, written by 'the victors' -- in this case, the party-line of Western medicine.
In this book, Crabtree does not once utter the word "chi." Never does he even hint that this "discovery" of Mesmer's MIGHT have been the West's actual discovery of pranic work (chi, or energy) -- attendant with its many variable focuses (some physical, some psychological, etc.) and the resultant confusion that brings for a culture unused to considering those things all part of the same spectrum, and which is trying to nail down a "thing" that it "is". And yet the inclusion of excerpts from the writings of Mesmer and many others in the pre-James Braid days makes it so patently obvious (to ME in any case) that this is what they were talking about that I couldn't help but exclaim out loud. Taken from that perspective (by anybody with a little bit of knowledge about Eastern medicine et al.) the history takes on a new richness and the subject a whole new wonder. This is my take on it though; one can't say that Crabtree ever said any such thing. This is just what I got out of it.
Anyway, the book is an excellent education about hypnosis, its development, the people involved, and the fascinating topic of what it's been used for, how and why and what some of the fascinating results were. Like any good book, it leaves you with as many ideas about questions as it does facts and answers (often about things you never even thought to ask).
I recommend the book highly. It's probably not a general-public book, in the sense that one needs a brain and an attention span to enjoy it -- it's a "serious" book. But for anyone interested in this topic, and especially those educated about it via modern schools, I strongly recommend it. I enjoyed it a great deal.


Author: Sydney E. Ahlstrom
Publisher: Yale University Press
Release: 1974
Summary: This classic work, winner of the 1973 National Book Award in Philosophy and Religion and "Christian Century’s "choice "as the Religious Book of the Decade (1979), is now issued with a new chapter by noted religious historian David Hall, who carries the story of American religious history forward to the present day.
Praise for the earlier edition:
“An unusual and praiseworthy book. . . . It takes a modern, almost anthropological view of history, in which worship is a part of a web of culture along with play, love, dress, and language.”—B.A. Weisberger, "Washington Post Book World "

“The most detailed, most polished of the works in its tradition.”—Martin E. Marty, "New York Times Book Review "

“An intellectual delight that one does not so much read as savor.”—"America"

“The definitive one-volume study by the leading authority.”—"Christianity Today"

“No one writing or thinking hereafter about America’s past will be able to ignore Ahlstrom’s magisterial account of the religious element.”—"American Historical Review "



Author: Paul Keith Conkin
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
Release: 1990
Summary: Coming from a background that is neither of the Restoration Movement, nor of the Holiness movements that came from the Cane Ridge American revival period, I still found this book to be objective and interesting. Conkin, as previously stated by other reviewers, does an excellent job of presenting the materials in a way that is neither flattering, nor insulting to the frontier's people. Instead, he gives rational explanation for why they behave how they do and a peek into the 17th century religious mindset that would prompt the religious exercising. This is a book worth checking out, even according to this 20-something Bible College student.

Author: Alec Maclellan
Publisher: Souvenir Press
Release: 1997
Summary: It's been some years since I read the first edition of this remarkable work. The book starts with a strange adventure I don't want to disclose to coming readers, but it surely is an invitation to embarge on a strange and interesting journey through history and underground tunnels. If you're in for suggestions of other civilisations in the past and the here-and-now, living in underground bases and tunnel-systems, eagerly waiting to visit the sunlitten surface again, then this is the book for you. Although MacLellan describe the various tales rather superficially, it surely can be a first invitation to research further into persons like Nicholas Roerich, Bullwer-Lytton, Ossendowski and other adventurers. It surely was an invitation for me...!

Author: Arthur David Kahn
Publisher: Pennsylvania State University Press
Release: 2004
Summary: As a participant in many of the events he writes about in Experiment in Occupation, Arthur Kahn offers a richly detailed account of the process by which the fight against Nazism came to be transformed into the Cold War. His story reveals how those in the Military Government of Germany who were dedicated to carrying out the war aims promulgated by Roosevelt and Eisenhower for a thorough democratization of Germany were ultimately defeated in their confrontation with powerful elements in the Military Government and in Washington who were more intent upon launching a preemptive war against the Soviet Union than upon the eradication of Nazism and German militarism.
A twenty-three-year-old OSS operative, Arthur Kahn was assigned after D-Day to a psychological warfare unit, where at first he supervised prisoner-of-war interrogations and then served as an editor of intelligence. Instructed to respond to requests from Supreme Headquarters, he drafted proposals for psychological warfare approaches to critical situations at the front only to discover that a SHAEF directive banned calls to the Germans to revolt. Subsequently Kahn served in liaison with the Soviets and during the Battle of the Bulge at Montgomery's British headquarters. For several months before and after VE Day he traveled through the American Zone as an intelligence investigator and wrote a report that led to the dismissal of General George S. Patton as Military Governor of Bavaria. Appointed Chief Editor of Intelligence of the Information Control Division, he produced the most influential intelligence weekly in the American Zone.
Kahn's portrayal of events in postwar Germany provides warnings for current and future American experiments in foreign occupation.


Author: Sarah Lucia Hoagland
Publisher: Pennsylvania State University Press
Release: 2000
Summary: Sarah Hoagland and Marilyn Frye's new anthology, Feminist Interpretations of Mary Daly is a self-proclaimed "open-ended journey" into Daly's philosophy and the very patriarchal canon she resists. Like some of the earlier Re-reading the Canon volumes, which situate women thinkers into a canon crafted to exclude them, this volume (with purposeful irony) places Daly "into the very canon which she herself has argued is a branch of patriarchal religion grounded in the dismemberment of the Goddess, and which her work is dedicated to undermining by means of animating women's possibilities."(2) In the same breath this collection places Daly in a rapidly emerging feminist canon that continues to distance itself from the radical feminism of the 1960s-70s. Viewing Radical Feminism as framework in progress, and not as an eight year experiment that ultimately failed, reveals uncharted territories and new possibilities for projects grounded in Daly's work. This collection takes the first steps into this newly imagined territory. Whether Daly's work changed/saved your life-- or, like me, you never read her closely because the word on the academic streets was that she had nothing serious to offer-this volume will forever change the way you think about one of the most prolific feminist writers of our time. For Daly scholars this anthology is filled with suggestions for new research projects. Daly skeptics will find unexpected interest in the daring and creative applications of her ideas to third wave feminist conversations. In any case, the collection brings together enough innovative re-readings of Daly's work to safely predict a renewed interest in her systematic philosophy, if not a renaissance in Daly scholarship. Dr. Alison Bailey Illinois State University

Author: Edward L. Thorndike
Publisher: The MIT Press
Release: 1974
Summary:

Author: Jeffrey John Kripal
Publisher: Indiana University Press
Release: 2005
Summary: "Esalen is on the edge. Located in Big Sur, California, just off Highway 1, Esalen is, geographically speaking, a literal cliff, hanging rather precariously over the Pacific Ocean. The Esselen Indians used the hot mineral springs here as healing baths for centuries before the European settlers arrived. . . . Today the place is adorned with a host of lush organic gardens; mountain streams; a cliffside swimming pool; an occasional Buddha or garden goddess; the same hot springs now embedded in a striking multimillion-dollar stone, cement, and steel spa; and a small collection of meditation huts tucked away in the trees. These are grounds that both constitute the very edge of the American frontier and look due west to see the East. . . ." —from the Introduction
The renowned Esalen Institute, founded in 1962 by Stanford graduates Michael Murphy and Richard Price, was created as a place "where the body can manifest the glories of the spirit." It offered guests a heady mixture of world mythology, hypnosis and psychic research, spiritual healing, sport mysticism, and Tantric eroticism. Among the notables who have spent time at the Institute are Abraham Maslow, Timothy Leary, Paul Tillich, Carlos Castaneda, B. F. Skinner, and former California governor Jerry Brown.
Despite its cultural significance, remarkably little has been written about Esalen itself. In On the Edge of the Future: Esalen and the Evolution of American Culture, 11 original essays, plus an afterword by co-founder Murphy, examine the Institute's roots, the place of its beliefs in American religious history, and its influence. This lively volume will fascinate anyone interested in the history of American religion as well as those who regard this remarkable place as the epicenter of the human potential movement.
The contributors are Catherine L. Albanese, Erik Erickson, Robert Fuller, Marion S. Goldman, Wouter J. Hanegraaff, Don Hanlon Johnson, Jeffrey J. Kripal, Timothy Miller, Michael Murphy, Glenn W. Shuck, Ann Taves, and Gordon Wheeler.


Author: Avital Ronell
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Release: 2002
Summary: "There are three things required for happiness: good health, selfishness, and stupidity, and without stupidity the others are useless." -- Gustave Flaubert
There is something about stupidity that is untrackable; it evades our cognitive scanners and turns up as the uncanny double of mastery or intelligence.
The political and social implications of stupidity have been articulated by Marx, Nietzsche, Deleuze, among others. Urgent yet recalcitrant, stupidity provokes a crisis in our understanding of politics, ethics, and psychoanalysis. The dilemma posed by the limited subject involves national identity, masochism and sexual politics, as well as the relation of poetic utterance to the stammer in which it originates. Essentially linked to the philosophical primal scene of stupor, stupidity also points to what has been historically inappropriable, as when Hannah Arendt considers Eichmann in terms not only of the banality but also the stupidity of evil.
Avital Ronell's work studies the fading empire of cognition, modulating stupidity into idiocy, puerility, and the figure of the ridiculous philosopher instituted by Kant. Investigating ignorance, dumbfoundedness, and the limits of reason, Stupidity probes the pervasive practice of theory-bashing and related forms of paranoid aggression. A section on prolonged and debilitating illness pushes the text to an edge of a corporeal hermeneutics, "at the limits of what the body knows and tells."


Author: William H. Tucker
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Release: 1996
Summary: I was a student of Dr. Tucker when I purchased this book for a course he taught in 1998. I did not realize then, as I do now, how important it is to understand how the eugenics movement in Germany and the U.S. had a profound effect on the involuntary sterilization of the mentally disabled. I believe the history of the eugenics movement must be reviewed in light of Tipper Gore's recommendations for changes in community mental health care through PACT programs which the National Aliance of Mental Illness (NAMI) is now proposing to state legislators. The PACT model is essentially a biomedical model, with specific social control features, deciding the fate of people with severe mental illnesses. The eugenics movement resulting in the involuntary sterilization of the "feeble minded" for over a half century, is hauntingly resonant of this proposed plan.

Author: Leon Surette
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Release: 1999
Summary: Pound in Purgatory, available now in paperback, overturns all previous explanations of Ezra Pound's anti-Semitism by uncovering its roots in economic and conspiracy theory. Leon Surette demonstrates that, contrary to popular opinion, Pound was not a life-long anti-Semite and consistently ignored or resisted anti-Semitic comments from his correspondents until after 1931.
From 1931 to 1945 Pound's poetry took a back seat to his activities as an economic reformer and propagandist for the corporate state. Pound believed he had a simple and practical solution for the economic woes of the world brought on by the Great Depression, and he became increasingly preoccupied with capturing political power for the economic reform he envisioned.
As the world spiraled toward war, Pound's program of economic reform foundered and he gradually succumbed to a paranoid belief in a Jewish conspiracy. Through an incisive analysis of Pound's correspondence and writings, much of it previously unexamined, Surette shows how this belief fostered the virulent anti-Semitism that pervades his work--both poetry and prose--from this time forward.


Author: Allan Chase
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
Release: 1980
Summary:

Author: Robert Boyers
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Release: 2005
Summary:
In these elegant essays, many of them originally written for "The New Republic" and "Harper's", Robert Boyers examines the role of the political imagination in shaping the works of such important contemporary writers as W. G. Sebald and Philip Roth, Nadine Gordimer and Mario Vargas Llosa, Natalia Ginzburg and Pat Barker, J. M. Coetzee and John Updike, V. S. Naipaul and Anita Desai. Occasionally he finds that politics actually figures very little in works that only pretend to be interested in politics. Elsewhere he discovers that certain writers are not equal to the political issues they take on or that their work is fatally compromised by complacency or wishful thinking.
In the main, though, Boyers writes as a lover of great literature who wishes to understand how the best writers do justice to their own political obsessions without suggesting that everything is reducible to politics. Resisting the notion that novels can be effectively translated into ideas or positions, he resists as well the notion that art and politics must be held apart, lest works of fiction somehow be contaminated by their association with "real life" or public issues. The essays offer a combination of close reading, argument, and assessment.
What, Boyers asks, is the relationship between form and substance in a work whose formal properties are particularly striking? Is it reasonable to think of a particular writer as "reactionary" merely because he presents an unflattering portrait of revolutionary activists or because he is less than optimistic about the future of newly independent societies? What is the status of private life in works set in politically tumultuous times? Can the novelist be "responsible" if he consistently refuses to engage the conditions that affect even the intimate lives of his characters?
Such questions inform these essays, which strive to be true to the essential spirit of the works they discuss and to interrogate, as sympathetically as possible, the imagination of writers who negotiate the unstable relationships between society and the individual, art and ideas.


Author: Andrew Chamberlin Rieser
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Release: 2003
Summary:
This book traces the rise and decline of what Theodore Roosevelt once called the "most American thing in America." The Chautauqua movement began in 1874 on the shores of Chautauqua Lake in western New York. More than a college or a summer resort or a religious assembly, it was a composite of all of these -- completely derivative yet brilliantly innovative. For five decades, Chautauqua dominated adult education and reached millions with its summer assemblies, reading clubs, and traveling circuits.
Scholars have long struggled to make sense of Chautauqua's pervasive yet disorganized presence in American life. In this critical study, Andrew Rieser weaves the threads of Chautauqua into a single story and places it at the vital center of "fin de siècle" cultural and political history. Famous for its commitment to democracy, women's rights, and social justice, Chautauqua was nonetheless blind to issues of class and race. How could something that trumpeted democracy be so undemocratic in practice? The answer, Rieser argues, lies in the historical experience of the white, Protestant middle classes, who struggled to reconcile their parochial interests with radically new ideas about social progress and the state. "The Chautauqua Moment" brings color to a colorless demographic and spins a fascinating tale of modern liberalism's ambivalent but enduring cultural legacy.


Author: Eva Illouz
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Release: 2003
Summary:
Oprah Winfrey is the protagonist of the story to be told here, but this book has broader intentions, begins Eva Illouz in this original examination of how and why this talk show host has become a pervasive symbol in American culture. Unlike studies of talk shows that decry debased cultural standards and impoverished political consciousness, "Oprah Winfrey and the Glamour of Misery" asks us to rethink our perceptions of culture in general and popular culture in particular.
At a time when crises of morality, beliefs, value systems, and personal worth dominate both public and private spheres, Oprah's emergence as a cultural form -- the Oprah persona -- becomes clearer, as she successfully reiterates some of our most pressing moral questions. Drawing on nearly one hundred show transcripts; a year and a half of watching the show regularly; and analysis of magazine articles, several biographies,
"O Magazine," Oprah Book Club novels, self-help manuals promoted on the show, and hundreds of discussions on the Oprah Winfrey Web site, Illouz takes the Oprah industry seriously, revealing it to be a multilayered "textual structure" that initiates, stages, and performs narratives of suffering and self-improvement that resonate with a wide audience and challenge traditional models of cultural analysis. This book looks closely at Oprah's method and her message, and in the process reconsiders popular culture and the tools we use to understand it.


Author: Alison Winter
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 2000
Summary: Across Victorian Britain, apparently reasonable people twisted into bizarre postures, called out in unknown languages, and placidly bore assaults that should have caused unbearable pain all while they were mesmerized. Alison Winter's fascinating cultural history traces the history of mesmerism in Victorian society. "Mesmerized" is both a social history of the age and a lively exploration of the contested territory between science and pseudo-science.

"Dazzling. . . . This splendid book . . . gives us a new form of historical understanding and a model for open and imaginative reading."--James R. Kinkaid, "Boston Globe"

"A landmark in the history of science scholarship."--John Sutherland, "The Independent"

"It is difficult to imagine the documentary side of the story being better done than by Winter's well-researched and generously illustrated study. . . . She is a lively and keen observer; and her book is a pleasure to read purely for its range of material and wealth of detail. . . . Fruitful and suggestive."--Daniel Karlin, "Times Literary Supplement"

"An ambitious, sweeping and fascinating historical study. . . . Beautifully written, thoroughly researched, and well-illustrated."--Bernard Lightman, "Washington Times"



Author: Mark C. Taylor
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1998
Summary: A century that began with modernism sweeping across Europe is ending with a remarkable resurgence of religious beliefs and practices throughout the world. Wherever one looks today, from headlines about political turmoil in the Middle East to pop music and videos, one cannot escape the pivotal role of religious beliefs and practices in shaping selves, societies, and cultures.

Following in the very successful tradition of "Critical Terms for Literary Studies" and "Critical Terms for Art History", this book attempts to provide a revitalized, self-aware vocabulary with which this bewildering religious diversity can be accurately described and responsibly discussed. Leading scholars working in a variety of traditions demonstrate through their incisive discussions that even our most basic terms for understanding religion are not neutral but carry specific historical and conceptual freight.

These essays adopt the approach that has won this book's predecessors such widespread acclaim: each provides a concise history of a critical term, explores the issues raised by the term, and puts the term to use in an analysis of a religious work, practice, or event. Moving across Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and Native American and Mayan religions, contributors explore terms ranging from experience, territory, and image, to God, sacrifice, and transgression.

The result is an essential reference that will reshape the field of religious studies and transform the way in which religion is understood by scholars from all disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, psychology, cultural studies, gender studies, and literary studies.




Author: Steven B. Smith
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 2006
Summary: Interest in Leo Strauss is greater now than at any time since his death, mostly because of the purported link between his thought and the political movement known as neoconservatism. Steven B. Smith, though, surprisingly depicts Strauss not as the high priest of neoconservatism but as a friend of liberal democracy—perhaps the best defender democracy has ever had. Moreover, in "Reading Leo Strauss, "Smith shows that Strauss’s defense of liberal democracy was closely connected to his skepticism of both the extreme Left and extreme Right.Smith asserts that this philosophical skepticism defined Strauss’s thought. It was as a skeptic, Smith argues, that Strauss considered the seemingly irreconcilable conflict between reason and revelation—a conflict Strauss dubbed the “theologico-political problem.” Calling this problem “"the" theme of my investigations,” Strauss asked the same fundamental question throughout his life: what is the relation of the political order to revelation in general and Judaism in particular?  Smith organizes his book with this question, first addressing Strauss’s views on religion and then examining his thought on philosophical and political issues.In his investigation of these philosophical and political issues, Smith assesses Strauss’s attempt to direct the teaching of political science away from the examination of mass behavior and interest group politics and toward the study of the philosophical principles on which politics are based. With his provocative, lucid essays, Smith goes a long way toward establishing a distinctive form of Straussian liberalism.

Author: Jonathan Z. Smith
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1993
Summary: In "Map Is Not Territory", Jonathan Z. Smith engages previous interpretations of religious texts from late antiquity, critically evaluates the notion of sacred space and time as it is represented in the works of Mircea Eliade, and tackles important problems of methodology.


 


Author: John Durham Peters
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 2001
Summary: Communication plays a vital and unique role in society-often blamed for problems when it breaks down and at the same time heralded as a panacea for human relations. A sweeping history of communication, "Speaking Into the Air" illuminates our expectations of communication as both historically specific and a fundamental knot in Western thought.

"This is a most interesting and thought-provoking book. . . . Peters maintains that communication is ultimately unthinkable apart from the task of establishing a kingdom in which people can live together peacefully. Given our condition as mortals, communication remains not primarily a problem of technology, but of power, ethics and art." --Antony Anderson, "New Scientist"

"Guaranteed to alter your thinking about communication. . . . Original, erudite, and beautifully written, this book is a gem." --"Kirkus Reviews"

"Peters writes to reclaim the notion of authenticity in a media-saturated world. It's this ultimate concern that renders his book a brave, colorful exploration of the hydra-headed problems presented by a rapid-fire popular culture." --"Publishers Weekly"

What we have here is a failure-to-communicate book. Funny thing is, it communicates beautifully. . . . "Speaking Into the Air" delivers what superb serious books always do-hours of intellectual challenge as one absorbs the gradually unfolding vision of an erudite, creative author." --Carlin Romano, "Philadelphia Inquirer"




Author: Marjorie Perloff
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 2003
Summary: Marjorie Perloff's stunning book was one of the first to offer a serious and far-reaching examination of the momentous flourishing of Futurist aesthetics in the European art and literature of the early twentieth century. Offering penetrating considerations of the prose, visual art, poetry, and carefully crafted manifestos of Futurists from Russia to Italy, Perloff reveals the Moment's impulses and operations, tracing its echoes through the years to the work of "postmodern" figures like Roland Barthes. This updated edition, with its new preface, reexamines the Futurist Moment in the light of a new century, in which Futurist aesthetics seem to have steadily more to say to the present.




Author: Alex Owen
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 2004
Summary: By the end of the nineteenth century, Victorians were seeking rational explanations for the world in which they lived. The radical ideas of Charles Darwin had shaken traditional religious beliefs. Sigmund Freud was developing his innovative models of the conscious and unconscious mind. And anthropologist James George Frazer was subjecting magic, myth, and ritual to systematic inquiry. Why, then, in this quintessentially modern moment, did late-Victorian and Edwardian men and women become absorbed by metaphysical quests, heterodox spiritual encounters, and occult experimentation?

In answering this question for the first time, "The Place of Enchantment" breaks new ground in its consideration of the role of occultism in British culture prior to World War I. Rescuing occultism from its status as an "irrational indulgence" and situating it at the center of British intellectual life, Owen argues that an involvement with the occult was a leitmotif of the intellectual avant-garde. Carefully placing a serious engagement with esotericism squarely alongside revolutionary understandings of rationality and consciousness, Owen demonstrates how a newly psychologized magic operated in conjunction with the developing patterns of modern life. She details such fascinating examples of occult practice as the sex magic of Aleister Crowley, the pharmacological experimentation of W. B. Yeats, and complex forms of astral clairvoyance as taught in secret and hierarchical magical societies like the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.

Through a remarkable blend of theoretical discussion and intellectual history, Owen has produced a work that moves far beyond a consideration of occultists and their world. Bearing directly on our understanding of modernity, her conclusions will force us to rethink the place of the irrational in modern culture.



Author: Deirdre N. Mccloskey
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 2006
Summary: For a century and a half, the artists and intellectuals of Europe have scornedthe bourgeoisie. And for a millennium and a half, the philosophers and theologians of Europe have scorned the marketplace. The bourgeois life, capitalism, Mencken’s “booboisie” and David Brooks’s “bobos”—all have been, and still are, framed as being responsible for everything from financial to moral poverty, world wars, and spiritual desuetude. Countering these centuries of assumptions and unexamined thinking is Deirdre McCloskey’s "The Bourgeois Virtues", a magnum opus that offers a radical view: capitalism is good for us.McCloskey’s sweeping, charming, and even humorous survey of ethical thought and economic realities—from Plato to Barbara Ehrenreich—overturns every assumption we have about being bourgeois. Can you be virtuous and bourgeois? Do markets improve ethics? Has capitalism made us better as well as richer? Yes, yes, and yes, argues McCloskey, who takes on centuries of capitalism’s critics with her erudition and sheer scope of knowledge. Applying a new tradition of “virtue ethics” to our lives in modern economies, she affirms American capitalism without ignoring its faults and celebrates the bourgeois lives we actually live, without supposing that they must be lives without ethical foundations. "High Noon", Kant, Bill Murray, the modern novel, van Gogh, and of course economics and the economy all come into play in a book that can only be described as a monumental project and a life’s work. "The Bourgeois Virtues "is nothing less than a dazzling reinterpretation of Western intellectual history, a dead-serious reply to the critics of capitalism—and a surprising page-turner.

Author: Tomoko Masuzawa
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 2005
Summary: The idea of "world religions" expresses a vague commitment to multiculturalism. Not merely a descriptive concept, "world religions" is actually a particular ethos, a pluralist ideology, a logic of classification, and a form of knowledge that has shaped the study of religion and infiltrated ordinary language.

In this ambitious study, Tomoko Masuzawa examines the emergence of "world religions" in modern European thought. Devoting particular attention to the relation between the comparative study of language and the nascent science of religion, she demonstrates how new classifications of language and race caused Buddhism and Islam to gain special significance, as these religions came to be seen in opposing terms-Aryan on one hand and Semitic on the other. Masuzawa also explores the complex relation of "world religions" to Protestant theology, from the hierarchical ordering of religions typical of the Christian supremacists of the nineteenth century to the aspirations of early twentieth-century theologian Ernst Troeltsch, who embraced the pluralist logic of "world religions" and by so doing sought to reclaim the universalist destiny of European modernity.




Author: Tomoko Masuzawa
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1993
Summary: In this pioneering work of discourse analysis, Tomoko Masuzawa observes that the modern study of religion is peculiarly ambivalent toward the question of origin. Today's historians of religion maintain that they have abandoned speculative quests for the origin of religion; at the same time, they allege that concepts of absolute beginnings are fundamental to religion itself. By renouncing the desire for origins that they claim religious peoples embrace, historians can vicariously participate in the forbidden quest--so it seems--without forfeiting the authority accruing from their objectivist position.

This ambivalence of contemporary scholars echoes their ambivalence toward the ancestral "giants" of the discipline: Durkheim, Müller, and Freud. Masuzawa shows that the speculations of these three men on the origins of religion render the very notion of time and history problematic and contain powerful instruments for dislodging the position of "Western man" as the keeper of knowledge. Her critical rereading of these forefathers is framed by a compelling discussion of the postmodernist subversion of absolute origins in the works of Walter Benjamin and Rosalind Krauss and a comparison of Mircea Eliade and Nancy Munn's accounts of the Australian aboriginal "dreamtime." Engaging a number of critical issues within the burgeoning field of cultural studies, Masuzawa's book will have far-reaching implications not only for religious studies but throughout the human sciences.



Author: Martin E. Marty
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1997
Summary: Martin E. Marty argues that religion in twentieth-century America was essentially shaped by its encounter with modernity. In this first volume, he records and explores the diverse ways in which American religion embraced, rejected, or cautiously accepted the modern world.

"Marty writes with the highest standards of scholarship and with his customary stylistic grace. No series of books is likely to tell us as much about the religious condition of our own time as "Modern American Religion."--Robert L. Spaeth, "Minneapolis Star Tribune"

"The wealth of material and depth of insight are beyond reproach. This book will clearly stand as an important meteorological guide to the storm front of modernity as it swept Americans into the twentieth century."--Belden C. Lane, "Review of Religions"

"Whatever one thinks about Marty's theological or philosophical position as a historian, the charm of his friendly circumspective approach to American religious history is irresistible."--John E. Wilson, "Theological Studies"

"Marty attempts to impose historical order on the divergent ways a century of Americans have themselves tried to find order in their worlds. . . . [He] meets the challenge deftly. . . . It is a book relevant to our time. . . . Engages the heart and mind jointly."--Andy Solomon, "Houston Post"




Author: Donald S. Lopez Jr.
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 2005
Summary: Over the past century, Buddhism has come to be seen as a world religion, exceeding Christianity in longevity and, according to many, philosophical wisdom. Buddhism has also increasingly been described as strongly ethical, devoted to nonviolence, and dedicated to bringing an end to human suffering. And because it places such a strong emphasis on rational analysis, Buddhism is considered more compatible with science than the other great religions. As such, Buddhism has been embraced in the West, both as an alternative religion and as an alternative "to" religion.

This volume provides a unique introduction to Buddhism by examining categories essential for a nuanced understanding of its traditions. Each of the fifteen essays here shows students how a fundamental term--from "art" to "word--"illuminates the practice of Buddhism, both in traditional Buddhist societies and in the realms of modernity. Apart from "Buddha", the list of terms in this collection deliberately includes none that are intrinsic to the religion. Instead, the contributors explore terms that are important for many fields and that invite interdisciplinary reflection. Through incisive discussions of topics ranging from "practice", "power", and "pedagogy" to "ritual", "history", "sex", and "death", the authors offer new directions for the understanding of Buddhism, taking constructive and sometimes polemical positions in an effort both to demonstrate the shortcomings of assumptions about the religion and the potential power of revisionary approaches.

Following the tradition of "Critical Terms for Religious Studies", this volume is not only an invaluable resource for the classroom but one that belongs on the short list of essential books for anyone seriously interested in Buddhism and Asian religions.




Author: Donald S. Lopez Jr.
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1999
Summary: "Prisoners of Shangri-La" is a provocative analysis of the romance of Tibet, a romance that, even as it is invoked by Tibetan lamas living in exile, ultimately imprisons those who seek the goal of Tibetan independence from Chinese occupation.

"Lopez lifts the veil on America's romantic vision of Tibet to reveal a country and a spiritual history more complex and less ideal than popular perceptions allow. . . . Lively and engaging, Lopez's book raises important questions about how Eastern religions are often co-opted, assimilated and misunderstood by Western culture."--"Publishers Weekly"

"Proceeding with care and precision, Lopez reveals the extent to which scholars have behaved like intellectual colonialists. . . . Someone had to burst the bubble of pop Tibetology, and few could have done it as resoundingly as Lopez."--"Booklist"

"Fascinating. . . [A] provocative exploration. Lopez conveys the full dizziness of the Western encounter with Tibet and Tibetan Buddhism."--Fred Pheil, "Tricycle: The Buddhist Review"

"A timely and courageous exploration. . . . [Lopez's] book will sharpen the terms of the debate over what the Tibetans and their observers can or should be doing about the place and the idea of Tibet. And that alone is what will give us all back our Shambhala."--Jonathan Spence, "Lingua Franca Book Review"

"Lopez's most important theme is that we should be wary of the idea . . . that Tibet has what the West lacks, that if we were only to look there we would find the answers to our problems. Lopez's book shows that, on the contrary, when the West has looked at Tibet, all that it has seen is a distorted reflection of itself."--Ben Jackson, "Times Higher Education Supplement"





Author: Donald S. Lopez Jr.
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1995
Summary: "Curators of the Buddha" is the first critical history of the study of Buddhism in the West and the first work to bring the insights of colonial and postcolonial cultural studies to bear on this field.

After an overview of the origins of Buddhist studies in the early nineteenth century, the essays focus on important "curators of the Buddha," such as Aurel Stein, D. T. Suzuki, and Carl Jung, who, as they created and maintained the discipline, played a significant role in disseminating knowledge about Buddhism in the West. The essays bring to life many of the important but unexamined social, political, and cultural conditions that have shaped the course of Buddhist studies for more than a century--and have frequently distorted the understanding of a complex set of traditions. Contributors Charles Hallisey, Gustavo Benavides, Stanley Abe, Luis Gómez, Robert Sharf, and Donald Lopez challenge some of the most enduring ideas in Buddhist studies: that Zen Buddhism is, above all, an experience; that Tibetan Buddhism is polluted, or pristine; that the Buddha image is of Greek or Roman origin; that the classical text supersedes the vernacular, as the manuscript supersedes the informant; and many others.



Author: Michael Hau
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 2003
Summary: From the 1890s to the 1930s, a growing number of Germans began to scrutinize and discipline their bodies in a utopian search for perfect health and beauty. Some became vegetarians, nudists, or bodybuilders, while others turned to alternative medicine or eugenics. In "The Cult of Health and Beauty in Germany", Michael Hau demonstrates why so many men and women were drawn to these life reform movements and examines their tremendous impact on German society and medicine.

Hau argues that the obsession with personal health and fitness was often rooted in anxieties over professional and economic success, as well as fears that modern industrialized civilization was causing Germany and its people to degenerate. He also examines how different social groups gave different meanings to the same hygienic practices and aesthetic ideals. What results is a penetrating look at class formation in pre-Nazi Germany that will interest historians of Europe and medicine and scholars of culture and gender.



Author: Luc Ferry
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1995
Summary: Is ecology in the process of becoming the object of our contemporary passions, in the same way that Fascism was in the 30s, or Communism under Stalin? In "The New Ecological Order", Luc Ferry offers a penetrating critique of the ideological roots of the "Deep Ecology" movement spreading throughout Germany, France, and the United States.

Traditional ecological movements, or "democratic ecology," seek to protect the environment of human societies; they are pragmatic and reformist. But another movement has become the refuge both of nostalgic counterrevolutionaries and of leftist illusions. This is "deep ecology." Its followers go beyond practical critiques of human greed and waste: they call into question the very possibility of human coexistence with nature. The human species is no longer at the center of the world, but subject to a new god called Nature. For these purists, man can only soil the harmony of the universe. In order to secure natural equilibrium, the only solution is to grant rights to animals, to trees, and to rocks.

Ferry launches his critique by examining early European legal cases concerning the status and rights of animals, including a few notorious cases where animals were brought to trial, found guilty, and publicly hanged. He then demonstrates that German Romanticism embraced certain key ideas of the deep ecology movement concerning the protection of animals and the environment. Later adopted by the Nazis, many of these ideas point to a profoundly antihumanistic component of deep ecology that is compatible with totalitarianism.

Ferry shows how deep ecology casts aside all the gains of human autonomy since the Enlightenment. He deciphers the philosophical and political assumptions of a movement that threatens to infantalize human society by preying on the fear of the authority of a new theological-political order. Far from denying our "duty in relation to nature," "The New Ecological Order" offers a bracing caution--against the dangers of environmental claims and, more important, against the threat to democracy contained in the deep ecology doctrine when pushed to its extreme.

"A book of intellectual power, full of insights, invention, and not without temerity, from one of the best political philosophers today."--"Le Figaro"

"Few books have analyzed in depth this phenomenon of the ecological movement as the most recent book by Luc Ferry has done. . . . It is a book that absolutely must be read."--"Le Point"



Author: Mircea Eliade
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1990
Summary: "Journal I" is a story of revewal--of the new life that began for Mircea Eliade in the fall of 1945 when he became an expatriate. Eliade came to Paris virtually empty-handed, following the death of his first wife and the Soviet takeover of Romania, which made him a "persona non grata "there. He had left half a lifetime in Romania: his parents, whom he never saw again; his library; unpublished and unfinished manuscripts, including the journal notebooks prior to 1940; an academic career; and" Zalmoxis", the journal of religious studies he founded.

During the lean years in Paris Eliade lived and worked in small, cold rooms; prepared meals on a Primus stove; pawned his valuables; and asked friends for loans. Eventually he secured a research stipend from the Bollingen Foundation. His ten years in Paris were among his most productive; the books he wrote during this period brought him worldwide acclaim as a historian of religions. He records his first meetings with Carl Jung, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, Gershom Scholem, Georges Bataille, André Breton, Raffaele Pettazzoni, and many other scholars and writers.

Eliade also continued to write literary works. Numerous entries describe his five-year struggle with his novel "The Forbidden Forest". Spanning the twelve fateful years from 1936 to 1948, it expresses within a fictional framework the central themes of Eliade's work on religions. Writing the novel was a Herculean task in which Eliade summarized and memorialized his old Romanian life.




Author: Mircea Eliade
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1988
Summary: "Here finally are Eliade's memoirs of the first thirty years of his life in Mac Linscott Rickett's crisp and lucid English translation. They present a fascinating account of the early development of a Renaissance talent, expressed in everything from daily and periodical journalism, realistic and fantastic fiction, and general nonfiction works to distinguished contributions to the history of religions. Autobiography follows an apparently amazingly candid report of this remarkable man's progression from a mischievous street urchin and literary prodigy, through his various love affairs, a decisive and traumatic Indian sojourn, and active, brilliant participation in pre-World War II Romanian cultural life."--Seymour Cain, "Religious Studies Review "


Author: Mircea Eliade
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1978
Summary: In the period domoninated by the triumphs of scientific rationalism, how do we account for the extraordinary success of such occult movements as astrology or the revival of witchcraft? From his perspective as a historian of religions, the eminent scholar Mircea Eliade shows that such popular trends develop from archaic roots and periodically resurface in certain myths, symbols, and rituals. In six lucid essays collected for this volume, Eliade reveals the profound religious significance that lies at the heart of many contemporary cultural vogues.

Since all of the essays except the last were originally delivered as lectures, their introductory character and lively oral style make them particularly accessible to the intelligent nonspecialist. Rather than a popularization," Occultism, Witchcraft, and Cultural Fashions" is the fulfillment of Eliade's conviction that the history of religions should be read by the widest possible audience.




Author: Ioan P. Culianu, Ioan P. Couliano
Publisher: University Of Chicago Press
Release: 1987
Summary: It is a widespread prejudice of modern, scientific society that "magic" is merely a ludicrous amalgam of recipes and methods derived from primitive and erroneous notions about nature. "Eros and Magic in the Renaissance" challenges this view, providing an in-depth scholarly explanation of the workings of magic and showing that magic continues to exist in an altered form even today. Renaissance magic, according to Ioan Couliano, was a scientifically plausible attempt to manipulate individuals and groups based on a knowledge of motivations, particularly erotic motivations. Its key principle was that everyone (and in a sense everything) could be influenced by appeal to sexual desire. In addition, the magician relied on a profound knowledge of the art of memory to manipulate the imaginations of his subjects. In these respects, Couliano suggests, magic is the precursor of the modern psychological and sociological sciences, and the magician is the distant ancestor of the psychoanalyst and the advertising and publicity agent. In the course of his study, Couliano examines in detail the ideas of such writers as Giordano Bruno, Marsilio Ficino, and Pico della Mirandola and illuminates many aspects of Renaissance culture, including heresy, medicine, astrology, alchemy, courtly love, the influence of classical mythology, and even the role of fashion in clothing. Just as science gives the present age its ruling myth, so magic gave a ruling myth to the Renaissance. Because magic relied upon the use of images, and images were repressed and banned in the Reformation and subsequent history, magic was replaced by exact science and modern technology and eventually forgotten. Couliano's remarkable scholarship helps us to recover much of its original significance and will interest a wide audience in the humanities and social sciences.

Author: Edward Hoffman
Publisher: Perseus Books
Release: 1997
Summary:

Author: David Bradshaw
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Incorporated
Release: 2002
Summary: This concise Companion offers an innovative approach to understanding the Modernist literary mind in Britain, focusing on the intellectual and cultural contexts which shaped it.The book consists of twelve chapters written by leading scholars, each spotlighting ideas emanating from a particular field which helped to shape Modernism, including eugenics, primitivism, Freudianism, and Nietzscheanism. Each contributor deals with his or her topic in some depth, but also pays attention to the impact it had on overarching issues. At the same time, the contributors identify contemporary developments in other disciplines, especially art, architecture, music, film, and philosophy, which paralleled developments in poetry, fiction, and drama. Each chapter concludes with a brief guide to further reading.Through reading this Companion, students will gain an understanding of Modernism as a historical and cultural phenomenon, as well as a literary movement.

Author: Paul Heelas
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Incorporated
Release: 1996
Summary: In his ground-breaking work, Paul Heelas traces the growth and development of the New Age Movement, identifies some of its key characteristics, and provides a critical perspective.This unique and extensively documented volume provides a balanced treatment of New Age "celebration of the self", and situates it within the broader cultural context for the first time. It shows how the New Age is ambivalently related to modernity, offering both a radical spiritual alternative to the mainstream and a celebration of some of the characteristic features of modern life. Heelas thus views the New Age both as an alternative counter-cultural movement and as a spirituality of our times. The volume, with its clarity of form and its critique of conventional opinion, serves as an excellent starting point and mature contribution to the study of contemporary spirituality. This will be a core text for courses on the Sociology of Religion, and should be of enormous interest to all those concerned with the study of culture and the utopian anthropologists of modernity, historians of oppositional movements, theology students, clergy, and New Age activists alike.

Author: David Theo Goldberg
Publisher: Blackwell Publishers
Release: 1993
Summary: Racist Culture offers an anti-essentialist and non-reductionist account of racialized discourse and racist expression. Goldberg demonstrates that racial thinking is a function of the transforming categories and conceptions of social subjectivity throughout modernity. He shows that racisms are often not aberrant or irrational but consistent with prevailing social conceptions, particularly of the reasonable and the normal. He shows too how this process is being extended and renewed by categories dominant in present day social sciences: "the West"; "the underclass"; and "the primitive". This normalization of racism reflected in the West mirrors South Africa an its use and conception of space. Goldberg concludes with an extended argument for a pragmatic, antiracist practice.

Author: Caroline Myss
Publisher: Three Rivers Press
Release: 2003
Summary: We all come into this world with "Sacred Contracts," according to bestselling author Caroline Myss. Some know it as a calling. Some see it as a life mission. "In short, a Sacred Contract is an agreement your soul makes before you are born," Myss explains. "You promise to do certain things for yourself, for others, and for divine purposes. Part of the Contract requires that you discover what you are meant to do." Herein lies the rub. Decoding our Sacred Contract requires us to become fluent in the language of symbols and archetypes so that we can interpret dreams, understand the meaning behind "coincidences," and learn to follow our intuition. This is why Myss ("The Anatomy of the Spirit") offers an extensive lesson on helping readers recognize their personal archetypes (we have about 12 of them), such as the Avenger (righteous activists), Networker (journalists, messengers), or Prostitute (someone who "sells out" easily). Myss then goes on to help readers create their own "Chart of Origin" (which profiles your "spiritual DNA"), using the teachings of the chakras and astrology. Part science, part ancient tradition, part magic, this book will gratify readers who are prepared to study the fine print of their Sacred Contracts. "--Gail Hudson"

Author: Paul H. Phd Ray, Sherry Ruth Anderson
Publisher: Three Rivers Press
Release: 2001
Summary: Do you "give a lot of importance to helping other people and bringing out their unique gifts?" Do you "dislike all the emphasis in modern culture on success and 'making it,' on getting and spending, on wealth and luxury goods?" Do you "want to be involved in creating a new and better way of life for our country?" If you answered yes to all three of these questions--and at least seven more of the remaining 15 in Paul Ray and Sherry Anderson's questionnaire--then you are probably a Cultural Creative.
"Cultural Creative" is a term coined by Ray and Anderson to describe people whose values embrace a curiosity and concern for the world, its ecosystem, and its peoples; an awareness of and activism for peace and social justice; and an openness to self-actualization through spirituality, psychotherapy, and holistic practices. Cultural Creatives do not just take the money and run; they don't want to defund the National Endowment for the Arts; and they do want women to get a fairer shake--not only in the United States, but around the globe.
On the basis of Ray and Anderson's research, about 50 million Americans are Cultural Creatives, a group that includes people of all races, ages, and classes. This subculture could have enormous social and political clout, the authors argue, if only it had any consciousness of itself as a cohesive unit, a society of fellow travelers. The husband and wife team wrote the book "to hold up a mirror" to the members of this vast but diffuse group, to show them they are not alone and that they can reshape society to make it more authentic, compassionate, and engaged. It is an idealistic call for a new agenda for a new millennium. "--I. Crane"


Author: Caroline Myss
Publisher: Three Rivers Press
Release: 1997
Summary: What sets "Anatomy of the Spirit" apart is Carolyn Myss's ability to blend diverse religious and spiritual beliefs into a succinct discussion of health and human anatomy. For example, when describing the seven energy fields of the human body, she fuses Christian sacraments with Hindu chakras and the Kabbalah's Tree of Life. Fortunately, Myss is a skilled writer as well as researcher, able to ground her extensive spiritual and religious discussions by using real-life stories and a tight writing style. Those who are squeamish with the notion of biography affecting biology will find this book a struggle (in one chapter, Myss links pancreatic cancer with a man's refusal to unburden his life and start fulfilling his dreams). Many, however, hail Myss for creating a valuable contribution to the ongoing exploration of spirituality and health. "--Gail Hudson"

Author: Deepak Chopra, M.D. Deepak Chopra
Publisher: Harmony
Release: 2003
Summary: As elegant as his bestselling How to Know God and as practical as his phenomenal The Seven Spiritual Laws of Success, this groundbreaking new book from Deepak Chopra contains a dramatic premise: Not only are everyday coincidences meaningful, they actually provide us with glimpses of the field of infinite possibilities that lies at the heart of all things. By gaining access to this wellspring of creation, we can literally rewrite our destinies in any way we wish.

From this realm of pure potential we are connected to everything that exists and everything that is yet to come. “Coincidences” can then be recognized as containing precious clues about particular facets of our lives that require our attention. As you become more aware of coincidences and their meanings, you begin to connect more and more with the underlying field of infinite possibilities. This is when the magic begins. This is when you achieve the spontaneous fulfillment of desire.

At a time when world events may leave us feeling especially insignificant and vulnerable, Deepak Chopra restores our awareness of the awesome powers within us. And through specific principles and exercises he provides the tools with which to create the magnificent, miraculous life that is our birthright.


Author: Walter Truett Anderson
Publisher: Backinprint.com
Release: 2004
Summary: "The first responsible account of an important, uniquely American happening - worthwhile reading for anyone who wants to piece together the social undercurrents of the '60s"
--Robert Marquand, Christian Science Monitor
"A charming, gossipy multiple biography of the curious gurus who spawned Esalen . . . a complex story, but a sequential one nonetheless, with feuds and psychic shoot-outs, games of capture the flag and smell the roses."
--Arthur Hough, San Francisco Chronicle
"Upstart Spring tells Esalen's riveting, unfinished story - even-handedly, entertainingly, with sympathy, and yet holding little back."
--David Toolan, Commonwealth
"An absolute delight: brimming with juicy gossip, and as carefully crafted as a page-turner novel. And it has substance, the gift of a therapist who also happens to be a cultural historian with a good eye for the telling meta-detail."
--Sandy McDonald, New Age Journal
"Walt Anderson has the requisite experience, humor, and affection (if not detachment, since Esalen teaches, indeed proves, that detachment is a universal impossibility) to carry off a wonderful account."
--Stewart Brand, Co-Evolution Quarterly
"A wonderful read, consistently entertaining on several levels."
--Michael Rossman, Associate for Humanistic Psychology Newsletter
"A superb wrap-up of a notable influence on our popular culture." --Rita Fink, Pacific Sun


Author: Aldous Huxley, David Bradshaw
Publisher: Faber and Faber Ltd
Release: 2002
Summary: If you enjoyed Huxley's insights in Brave New world and have an interest in political theory in general, you'll enjoy this book. In this collection of essays and broadcasts Huxley waxes on evereything from childcare to sex to big business to education.

Author: Shirley Maclaine
Publisher: Bantam Books
Release: 1983
Summary: This book is a must read for anyone who is looking for more meaning in life. It depicts the author's efforts to become more aware of her spiritual being. She shares the great amount of knowledge she has gained from the many books she has read and the many friends in her life. The portions detailing her affair are important, but are a frustrating detour from the main subject. All in all, it is a wonderful place to start your own spiritual journey.

Author: Tom Wolfe
Publisher: Bantam
Release: 1999
Summary: They say if you remember the '60s, you weren't there. But, fortunately, Tom Wolfe was there, notebook in hand, politely declining LSD while Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters fomented revolution, turning America on to a dangerously playful way of thinking as their Day-Glo conveyance, Further, made the most influential bus ride since Rosa Parks's. By taking "On the Road"'s hero Neal Cassady as his driver on the cross-country revival tour and drawing on his own training as a magician, Kesey made Further into a bully pulpit, and linked the beat epoch with hippiedom. Paul McCartney's "Many Years from Now" cites Kesey as a key influence on his trippy "Magical Mystery Tour" film. Kesey temporarily renounced his literary magic for the cause of "tootling the multitudes"--making a spectacle of himself--and Prankster Robert Stone had to flee Kesey's wild party to get his life's work done. But in those years, Kesey's life "was" his work, and Wolfe infinitely multiplied the multitudes who got tootled by writing this major literary-journalistic monument to a resonant pop-culture moment.
Kesey's theatrical metamorphosis from the distinguished author of "One Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest" to the abominable shaman of the "Acid Test" soirees that launched The Grateful Dead required Wolfe's Day-Glo prose account to endure (though Kesey's own musings in "Demon Box" are no slouch either). Even now, Wolfe's book gives what Wolfe clearly got from Kesey: a contact high. "--Tim Appelo"


Author: Tom Wolfe
Publisher: Bantam
Release: 1999
Summary: If generals prepare for the last war, the politicians run on yesterday's issues. Never was this truer than in the 1970s. Our elected elite couldn't get a handle on the times.
But Tom Wolfe could. In fact he gave the era its name -- "The Me Decade." And like an artist briskly painting the passing scene, he captured it in stories and essays. This collection includes the best -- "Pornoviolence," "Funky Chic," "The Man Who Always Peaked Too Soon" plus the story for which this collection is named.
"Wolfe sees it fresh and tells it true...great vivacity and intelligence." (The Observer)


Author: Sam Keen
Publisher: Bantam
Release: 1992
Summary: I'm actually writing this first version of my review while still reading the book. Not all ideas Sam Keen conveys are original but the presentation as a whole has been somewhat of an empiphany for me. That is to say, it has given me jarringly lucid insight into who I am as a male and the very predictable patterns I, and many other men fall into. While reading the first five chapters, I was struck at how well I was described.

I am glad Sam Keen had the courage to write on such a controversial yet worthy topic. All men need to read this book and reflect on their female relationships: mother, partner, children, co-workers and friends alike.

I'm not yet sure that simply the awareness of my male tendancies relative to WOMAN will be a solution to faulty relating, but it is certainly a start. Understanding and acting in a less "programmed" manner would be a worthy goal for men who read this book.

Keen's acknowledgement that although we are all human beings, we are profoundly different in our historical roles, cultural roles, socialization, and (naturally) in our physiology, is a simple yet profound truth that needs to be carried in the front our awareness while interacting with the opposite sex.

This is a vital book for men (and women too) in this age of painful gender division and misunderstanding.


Author: H.G. Wells
Publisher: Bantam Classics
Release: 1994
Summary: A shipwreck in the South Seas, a palm-tree paradise where a mad doctor conducts vile experiments, animals that become human and then "beastly" in ways they never were before--it's the stuff of high adventure. It's also a parable about Darwinian theory, a social satire in the vein of Jonathan Swift ("Gulliver's Travels"), and a bloody tale of horror. Or, as H. G. Wells himself wrote about this story, ""The Island of Dr. Moreau" is an exercise in youthful blasphemy. Now and then, though I rarely admit it, the universe projects itself towards me in a hideous grimace. It grimaced that time, and I did my best to express my vision of the aimless torture in creation." This colorful tale by the author of "The Time Machine", "The Invisible Man", and "The War of the Worlds" lit a firestorm of controversy at the time of its publication in 1896.

Author: Michael Kellogg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2005
Summary: This groundbreaking book examines the overlooked topic of the influence of anti-Bolshevik, anti-Semitic Russian exiles on Nazism. White émigrés contributed politically, financially, militarily, and ideologically to National Socialism. This work refutes the notion that Nazism developed as a peculiarly German phenomenon: it arose primarily from the cooperation between völkisch (nationalist/racist) Germans and vengeful White émigrés. From 1920-1923, Adolf Hitler collaborated with a conspiratorial far right German-White émigré organization, Aufbau (Reconstruction). Aufbau allied with Nazis to overthrow the German government and Bolshevik rule through terrorism and military-paramilitary schemes. This organization's warnings of the monstrous 'Jewish Bolshevik' peril helped to inspire Hitler to launch an invasion of the Soviet Union and to initiate the mass murder of European Jews. This book uses extensive archival materials from Germany and Russia, including recently declassified documents, and will prove invaluable reading for anyone interested in the international roots of National Socialism.

Author: David Howie
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2002
Summary: This book is a study of the concept of probability as it has been used and applied across a number of scientific disciplines from genetics to geophysics. Probability has a dual aspect: sometimes it is a numerical ratio; sometimes, in the Bayesian interpretation, a degree of belief. David Howie examines probabilistic theories of scientific knowledge, and asks how, despite being adopted by many scientists and statisticians in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Bayesianism was discredited as a theory of scientific inference during the 1920s and 1930s. Through a close examination of a dispute between two British scientists, the author argues that a choice between the two interpretations of probability is not forced by pure logic, or the mathematics of the situation, but depends on the experiences and aims of the individuals involved, and their views of the correct form of scientific inquiry.

Author: Nicola Bown
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2004
Summary: This collection brings together essays by scholars from literature, history of art and history of science which explore the diversity of Victorian fascination with the supernatural: ghosts and fairies, table-rappings and telepathic encounters, occult religions and the idea of reincarnation, visions of the other world and a reality beyond the everyday. These essays demonstrate that the supernatural was not simply a reaction to the "post-Darwinian loss of faith", but was embedded in virtually every aspect of Victorian culture.

Author: Donald J. Childs
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2001
Summary: In Modernism and Eugenics, Donald Childs reveals how Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, and W.B. Yeats believed in eugenics, the science of racial improvement, and adapted this scientific discourse to the language and purposes of the modern imagination. He traces the impact of the eugenics movement on such modernist works as Mrs. Dalloway, The Waste Land, and Yeats's late poetry and early plays. This is an original study of a controversial theme which reveals the centrality of eugenics in the life and work of several major modernist writers.

Author: Jim Sidanius, Felicia Pratto
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2001
Summary: This book suggests that the major forms in intergroup conflict, such as racism, classism and patriarchy, are essentially derived from the human predisposition to form and maintain hierarchical and group-based systems of social organization. Using social dominance theory, it is presumed that it is also a basic grammar of social power shared by all societies in common. We use social dominance theory in an attempt to identify the elements of this grammar and to understand how these elements interact and reinforce each other to produce and maintain group-based social hierarchy.

Author: Pamela Thurschwell
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2001
Summary: Thurschwell examines the intersection of literary culture, the occult and new technology at the fin-de-siècle. She argues that as new technologies, such as the telegraph and the telephone, began suffusing the public imagination from the mid-nineteenth century on, they seemed to support the claims of spiritualist mediums. Making unexpected connections between, for instance, speaking on the telephone and speaking to the dead, she examines how psychical research is reflected in the work of Henry James, George DuMaurier and Oscar Wilde among others.

Author: Deirdre David
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2001
Summary: In The Cambridge Companion to the Victorian Novel, a series of specially-commissioned essays examine the work of Charles Dickens, the Brontës, George Eliot and other canonical writers, as well as that of such writers as Olive Schreiner, Wilkie Collins and H. Rider Haggard, whose work has recently attracted new attention from scholars and students. Contributors engage with topics such as industrial culture, religion and science and the broader issues of the politics of gender, sexuality and race. The Companion includes a chronology and a comprehensive Guide to Further Reading.

Author: Sahotra Sarkar
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 1998
Summary: With the advent of the Human Genome Project there have been many claims for the genetic origins of complex human behavior including insanity, criminality, and intelligence. But what does it really mean to call something "genetic"? This is the fundamental question that Sahotra Sarkar's book addresses. This important book clarifies the meaning of the term "genetic," shows how molecular studies have affected genetics, and provides the philosophical background necessary to understand the debates over the Human Genome Project. It will be of particular interest to professionals and students in the philosophy of science, the history of science, and the social studies of science, medicine, and technology.

Author: Richard Breitman, Norman J. W. Goda, Timothy Naftali, Robert Wolfe
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2005
Summary: At a time when intelligence successes and failures are at the center of public discussion, this book provides an unprecedented inside look at how intelligence agencies function during war and peacetime. As the direct result of the 1998 Nazi War Crimes Disclosure Act, the volume draws upon many documents declassified under this law to reveal what U.S. intelligence agencies learned about Nazi crimes during World War II and about the nature of Nazi intelligence agencies' role in the Holocaust. It examines how some U.S. corporations found ways to profit from Nazi Germany's expropriation of the property of German Jews. The work also reveals startling new details on the Cold War connections between the U.S. government and Hitler's former officers.

Author: Richard Steigmann-Gall
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2004
Summary: Analyzing the previously unexplored religious views of the Nazi elite, Richard Steigmann-Gall argues against the consensus that Nazism as a whole was either unrelated to Christianity or actively opposed to it. In contrast, Steigmann-Gall demonstrates that many in the Nazi movement believed the contours of their ideology were based on a Christian understanding of Germany's ills and their cure. He also explores the struggle the "positive Christians" waged with the party's paganists and demonstrates that this was not just a conflict over religion, but over the very meaning of Nazi ideology itself. Richard Steigmann-Gall is assistant professor of history at Kent Sate University. He earned his BA and MA at the University of Michigan, and PhD at the University of Toronto. He has earned fellowships and awards from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Sassoon International Center for the Study of Antisemitism in Israel, and the Max-Planck Institut fur Geschichte in Göttingen. His research interests include modern Germany, Fascism, and religion and society in Europe, and he has published articles in Central European History, German History, Social History, and Kirchliche Zeitgeschichte.

Author: James H. Capshew
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 1999
Summary: Psychologists on the March argues that the Second World War had a profound impact on the modern psychological profession in America. Before the war, psychology was viewed largely as an academic discipline, drawing its ideology and personnel from the laboratory. Following the war, it was increasingly seen as a source of theory and practice to deal with mental health issues. With the support of the federal government, the field entered a prolonged period of exponential growth that saw major changes in the institutional structure of the field that spread to include the epistemological foundations of psychology. This book is the first sustained study of this important era in American psychology. Moving back and forth between collective and individual levels of analysis, it weaves together the internal politics and demography of psychology in relation to the cultural environment. It is based on extensive archival research and includes extended discussions of the wartime reformation of the American Psychological Association, the role of gender politics, the rise of reflexivity, and the popularization of psychology, among other topics.

Author: Paul Weindling
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 1993
Summary: Based on a wealth of hitherto neglected archival sources, this study analyzes the origins, social composition and impact of eugenics in the context of the social and political tension of the rapidly industrializing Nazi empire. Until recently, historians of German racism have limited their analysis of the origins of the Holocaust to a handful of völkisch racial ideologies, overlooking the effects of racial ideas on biology, on the rapidly expanding medical profession and on public health services. Historians of medicine and social and political historians of modern Germany will be interested in this important book.

Author: Michael Burleigh, Wolfgang Wippermann
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 1993
Summary: Between 1933 and 1945 the Nazi regime in Germany tried to restructure a "class" society along racial lines. This book deals with the ideas and institutions that underpinned this mission, and shows how Nazi policy affected various groups of people, both victims and beneficiaries. The book begins with a serious discussion of the origins of Nazi racial ideology, and then demonstrates the way in which this was translated into official policy. It deals with the systematic persecution not only of the Jews, but also with the fate of lesser-known groups such as Sinti and Roma, the mentally handicapped, the "asocial," and homosexuals.

Author: Pamela Thurschwell
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Release: 2005
Summary: Thurschwell examines the intersection of literary culture, the occult and new technology at the fin-de-siècle. She argues that as new technologies, such as the telegraph and the telephone, began suffusing the public imagination from the mid-nineteenth century on, they seemed to support the claims of spiritualist mediums. Making unexpected connections between, for instance, speaking on the telephone and speaking to the dead, she examines how psychical research is reflected in the work of Henry James, George DuMaurier and Oscar Wilde among others.

Author: Eric Avila
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2006
Summary: Los Angeles pulsed with economic vitality and demographic growth in the decades following World War II. This vividly detailed cultural history of L.A. from 1940 to 1970 traces the rise of a new suburban consciousness adopted by a generation of migrants who abandoned older American cities for Southern California's booming urban region. Eric Avila explores expressions of this new "white identity" in popular culture with provocative discussions of Hollywood and film noir, Dodger Stadium, Disneyland, and L.A.'s renowned freeways. These institutions not only mirrored this new culture of suburban whiteness and helped shape it, but also, as Avila argues, reveal the profound relationship between the increasingly fragmented urban landscape of Los Angeles and the rise of a new political outlook that rejected the tenets of New Deal liberalism and anticipated the emergence of the New Right.
Avila examines disparate manifestations of popular culture in architecture, art, music, and more to illustrate the unfolding urban dynamics of postwar Los Angeles. He also synthesizes important currents of new research in urban history, cultural studies, and critical race theory, weaving a textured narrative about the interplay of space, cultural representation, and identity amid the westward shift of capital and culture in postwar America.


Author: Alexandra Stern
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2005
Summary: Many people assume that eugenics all but disappeared with the fall of Nazism, but as this sweeping history demonstrates, the idea of better breeding had a wide and surprising reach in the United States throughout the twentieth century. With an original emphasis on the American West, "Eugenic Nation "brings to light many little-known facts--for example, that one-third of the involuntary sterilizations in this country occurred in California between 1909 and 1979--as it explores the influence of eugenics on phenomena as varied as race-based intelligence tests, school segregation, tropical medicine, the Border Patrol, and the environmental movement.
"Eugenic Nation "begins in the 1900s, when influential California eugenicists molded an extensive agenda of better breeding for the rest of the country. The book traces hereditarian theories of sex and gender to the culture of conformity of the 1950s and moves to the 1960s, arguing that the liberation movements of that decade emerged in part as a challenge to policies and practices informed by eugenics.


Author: David Morgan
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2005
Summary: "Sacred gaze" denotes any way of seeing that invests its object --an image, a person, a time, a place--with spiritual significance. Drawing from many different fields, David Morgan investigates key aspects of vision and imagery in a variety of religious traditions. His lively, innovative book explores how viewers absorb and process religious imagery and how their experience contributes to the social, intellectual, and perceptual construction of reality. Ranging widely from thirteenth-century Japan and eighteenth-century Tibet to contemporary America, Thailand, and Africa, "The Sacred Gaze "discusses the religious functions of images and the tools viewers use to interpret them. Morgan questions how fear and disgust of images relate to one another and explains how scholars study the long and evolving histories of images as they pass from culture to culture. An intriguing strand of the narrative details how images have helped to shape popular conceptions of gender and masculinity. The opening chapter considers definitions of "visual culture" and how these relate to the traditional practice of art history.
Amply illustrated with more than seventy images from diverse religious traditions, this masterful interdisciplinary study provides a comprehensive and accessible resource for everyone interested in how religious images and visual practice order space and time, communicate with the transcendent, and embody forms of communion with the divine. "The Sacred Gaze "is a vital introduction to the study of the visual culture of religions.


Author: Julie Guthman
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2004
Summary: In an era of escalating food politics, many believe organic farming to be the agrarian answer. In this first comprehensive study of organic farming in California, Julie Guthman casts doubt on the current wisdom about organic food and agriculture, at least as it has evolved in the Golden State. Refuting popular portrayals of organic agriculture as a small-scale family farm endeavor in opposition to "industrial" agriculture, Guthman explains how organic farming has replicated what it set out to oppose.

Author: Kris Fresonke
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2004
Summary: Two centuries after their expedition awoke the nation both to the promise and to the disquiet of the vast territory out west, Lewis and Clark still stir the imagination, and their adventure remains one of the most celebrated and studied chapters in American history. This volume explores the legacy of Lewis and Clark's momentous journey and, on the occasion of its bicentennial, considers the impact of their westward expedition on American culture. Approaching their subject from many different perspectives--literature, history, women's studies, law, medicine, and environmental history, among others--the authors chart shifting attitudes about the explorers and their journals, together creating a compelling, finely detailed picture of the "interdisciplinary intrigue" that has always surrounded Lewis and Clark's accomplishment. This collection is most remarkable for its insights into ongoing debates over the relationships between settler culture and aboriginal peoples, law and land tenure, manifest destiny and westward expansion, as well as over the character of Sacagawea, the expedition's vision of nature, and the interpretation and preservation of the Lewis and Clark Trail.

Author: Hugh Urban
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2003
Summary: A complex body of religious practices that spread throughout the Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain traditions; a form of spirituality that seemingly combines sexuality, sensual pleasure, and the full range of physical experience with the religious life--Tantra has held a central yet conflicted role within the Western imagination ever since the first "discovery" of Indian religions by European scholars. Always radical, always extremely Other, Tantra has proven a key factor in the imagining of India. This book offers a critical account of how the phenomenon has come to be.
Tracing the complex genealogy of Tantra as a category within the history of religions, Hugh B. Urban reveals how it has been formed through the interplay of popular and scholarly imaginations. Tantra emerges as a product of mirroring and misrepresentation at work between East and West--a dialectical category born out of the ongoing play between Western and Indian minds. Combining historical detail, textual analysis, popular cultural phenomena, and critical theory, this book shows Tantra as a shifting amalgam of fantasies, fears, and wish-fulfillment, at once native and Other, that strikes at the very heart of our constructions of the exotic Orient and the contemporary West.


Author:
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2003
Summary: "Pathologies of Power" uses harrowing stories of life--and death--in extreme situations to interrogate our understanding of human rights. Paul Farmer, a physician and anthropologist with twenty years of experience working in Haiti, Peru, and Russia, argues that promoting the social and economic rights of the world's poor is the most important human rights struggle of our times. With passionate eyewitness accounts from the prisons of Russia and the beleaguered villages of Haiti and Chiapas, this book links the lived experiences of individual victims to a broader analysis of structural violence. Farmer challenges conventional thinking within human rights circles and exposes the relationships between political and economic injustice, on one hand, and the suffering and illness of the powerless, on the other.
Farmer shows that the same social forces that give rise to epidemic diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis also sculpt risk for human rights violations. He illustrates the ways that racism and gender inequality in the United States are embodied as disease and death. Yet this book is far from a hopeless inventory of abuse. Farmer's disturbing examples are linked to a guarded optimism that new medical and social technologies will develop in tandem with a more informed sense of social justice. Otherwise, he concludes, we will be guilty of managing social inequality rather than addressing structural violence. Farmer's urgent plea to think about human rights in the context of global public health and to consider critical issues of quality and access for the world's poor should be of fundamental concern to a world characterized by the bizarre proximity of surfeit and suffering.


Author: Harvey Levenstein
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2003
Summary: In this sweeping history of food and eating in modern America, Harvey Levenstein explores the social, economic, and political factors that have shaped the American diet since 1930.

Author: Kris Fresonke
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2002
Summary: Where did American literature start? The familiar story of Emerson and Thoreau has them setting up shop in Concord, Massachusetts, and determining the course of American writing. "West of Emerson "overhauls this story of origins as it shifts the context for these literary giants from the civilized East to the wide-open spaces of the Louisiana Purchase. Kris Fresonke tracks down the texts by explorers of the far West that informed "Nature, "Emerson's most famous essay, and proceeds to uncover the parodic Western politics at play in classic New England works of Romanticism. Westerns, this book shows, helped create "Easterns."
"West of Emerson "roughs up genteel literary history: Fresonke argues for a fresh mix of American literature, one based on the far reaches of American territory and American literary endeavor. Reading into the record the unexplored writings of Lewis and Clark, Zebulon Pike, Stephen Long, and William Emory, Fresonke forges surprising connections between the American West and the American visions emanating from the neighborhood of Walden Pond. These connections open a new view of the politics--and, by way of the notion of "design," the theological lineage--of manifest destiny. Finally, Fresonke's book shows how the cast of the American canon, no less than the direction of American politics, came to depend on what design one placed on the continent.


Author: Theodora Kroeber
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2002
Summary: The life story of Ishi, the Yahi Indian, lone survivor of a doomed tribe, is unique in the annals of North American anthropology. For more than forty years, Theodora Kroeber's biography has been sharing this tragic and absorbing drama with readers all over the world.
Ishi stumbled into the twentieth century on the morning of August 29, 1911, when, desperate with hunger and with terror of the white murderers of his family, he was found in the corral of a slaughterhouse near Oroville, California. Finally identified as an Indian by an anthropologist, Ishi was brought to San Francisco by Professor T. T. Waterman and lived there the rest of his life under the care and protection of Alfred Kroeber and the staff of the University of California's Museum of Anthropology. Karl Kroeber adds an informative tribute to the text, describing how the book came to be and how Theodora Kroeber's approach to the project was both a product of her era and of her insight and her empathy.


Author: Beryl Satter
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2001
Summary: The New Thought Movement was an enormously popular late nineteenth-century spiritual movement led largely by and for women. Mary Baker Eddy's Christian Science is but one example of the fascinating range of these groups, which advocated a belief in mind over matter and espoused women's spiritual ability to purify the world. This work is the first to uncover the cultural implications of New Thought, embedding it in the intellectual traditions of nineteenth-century America, and illuminating its connections with the self-help and New Age enthusiasms of our own fin-de-siècle.
Beryl Satter examines New Thought in all its complexity, presenting along the way a captivating cast of characters. In lively and accessible prose, she introduces the people, the institutions, the texts, and the ideas that comprised the New Thought movement. This fascinating social and intellectual history explores the complex relationships among social reform, alternative religion, medicine, and psychology which persist to this day.


Author: Gray Brechin
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2001
Summary: San Francisco is a city clouded in myth. This urban biography provides an entirely new vision of the city's history, laying bare the inner dynamics of the regional civilization centered in San Francisco. "Imperial San Francisco" examines the far-reaching environmental impact that one city and the elite families that hold power in it have had on the Pacific Basin for over a century and a half. The book provides a literate, myth-shattering interpretation of the hidden costs that the growth of San Francisco has exacted on its surrounding regions, presenting along the way a revolutionary new theory of urban development. Written in a lively, accessible style, the narrative is filled with vivid characters, engrossing stories, and a rich variety of illustrations.
As he uncovers the true costs of building an imperial city, Gray Brechin addresses the dynastic ambitions of frontier oligarchies, the environmental and social effects of the mining industry, the creation of two universities, the choice of imperial architecture to symbolize the aspirations of San Franciscans in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, manipulation of public thought by the city's media, and more. He traces the exploitation of both local and distant regions by prominent families--the Hearsts, de Youngs, Spreckelses, and others--who gained wealth and power through mining, control of ranching, water and energy, transportation, real estate, and weapons.
This broad history of San Francisco is a story of greed and ambition on an epic scale. "Imperial San Francisco" incorporates rare period illustrations, personal correspondence, and public statements to show how a little-known power elite has used the city as a tool to increase its own wealth and power. Brechin's story advances a new way of understanding urban history as he traces the links among environment, economy, and technology that led, ultimately, to the creation of the atomic bomb and the nuclear arms race.
"Los Angeles Times Best Nonfiction Book of 2000"


Author: Stephanie Barron, Sheri Bernstein, Ilene Susan Fort
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2000
Summary: This companion volume to the exhibition "Made in California: Art, Image, and Identity,1900-2000" at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art offers in-depth, illustrated essays on the making of California culture in the twentieth century. Written by a stellar cast of art historians and scholars in the humanities, the essays look closely at the forces that shaped fine art and material culture in California. The contributors weave their subjects around themes that are central to the milestone exhibition: the California landscape--both the natural and built environments--and the state's cultural and political relationships with Latin America and Asia.
These provocative essays cover topics such as counterculture architecture, Watts Towers, border culture, identity and gender issues, the role of schools in California art, auto tourism, Hollywood, music, Beat culture, politics, literature, photography, and much more. Accessibly written and intellectually engaging, these essays sharpen our understanding of California in the twentieth century and bring together many diverse, yet interrelated, aspects of its art and culture.


Author: Kimberley C. Patton
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 2000
Summary: The first thorough assessment of the field of comparative religion in forty years, this groundbreaking volume surmounts the seemingly intractable division between postmodern scholars who reject the comparative endeavor and those who affirm it. The contributors demonstrate that a broader vision of religion, involving different scales of comparison for different purposes, is both justifiable and necessary.
"A Magic Still Dwells" brings together leading historians of religions from a wide range of backgrounds and vantage points, and draws from traditions as diverse as Indo-European mythology, ancient Greek religion, Judaism, Buddhism, Ndembu ritual, and the spectrum of religions practiced in America. The contributors take seriously the postmodern critique, explain its impact on their work, uphold or reject various premises, and in several cases demonstrate new comparative approaches. Together, the essays represent a state-of-the-art assessment of current issues in the comparative study of religion.


Author: Anthony Heilbut
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 1997
Summary: A brilliant look at the writers, artists, scientists, movie directors, and scholars--ranging from Bertolt Brecht to Albert Einstein, Hannah Arendt, Thomas Mann, and Fritz Lang--who fled Hitler's Germany and how they changed the very fabric of American culture. In a new postscript, Heilbut draws attention to the recent changes in reputation and image that have shaped the reception of the German exiles.

Author: Karl Toepfer
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 1997
Summary: "Empire of Ecstasy" offers a novel interpretation of the explosion of German body culture between the two wars--nudism and nude dancing, gymnastics and dance training, dance photography and criticism, and diverse genres of performance from solo dancing to mass movement choirs. Karl Toepfer presents this dynamic subject as a vital and historically unique construction of "modern identity."
The modern body, radiating freedom and power, appeared to Weimar artists and intelligentsia to be the source of a transgressive energy, as well as the sign and manifestation of powerful, mysterious "inner" conditions. Toepfer shows how this view of the modern body sought to extend the aesthetic experience beyond the boundaries imposed by rationalized life and to transcend these limits in search of ecstasy. With the help of much unpublished or long-forgotten archival material (including many little-known photographs), he investigates the process of constructing an "empire" of appropriative impulses toward ecstasy.
Toepfer presents the work of such well-known figures as Rudolf Laban, Mary Wigman, and Oskar Schlemmer, along with less-known but equally fascinating body culture practitioners. His book is certain to become required reading for historians of dance, body culture, and modernism.


Author: Robert N. Bellah, Richard Madsen, William M. Sullivan, Ann Swidler, Steven M. Tipton
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 1996
Summary: "Habits of the Heart" is required reading for anyone who wants to understand how religion contributes to and detracts from America's common good. An instant classic upon publication in 1985, it was reissued in 1996 with a new introduction describing the book's continuing relevance for a time when the country's racial and class divisions are being continually healed and ripped open again by religious people. "Habits of the Heart" describes the social significance of faiths ranging from "Sheilaism" (practiced by a California nurse named Sheila) to conservative Christianity. It's thoroughly readable, theologically respectful, and academically irreproachable. "--Michael Joseph Gross"

Author: Tom&Amp;Aacute;S Almaguer
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 1994
Summary: This book unravels the ethnic history of California since the late nineteenth-century Anglo-American conquest and institutionalization of "white supremacy" in the state. Almaguer comparatively assesses the struggles for control of resources, status, and political legitimacy between the European American and the Native American, Mexican, African-American, Chinese, and Japanese populations. Drawing from an array of primary and secondary sources, he weaves a detailed, disturbing portrait of ethnic, racial, and class relationships during this tumultuous time.
The U.S. annexation of California in 1848 and the simultaneous discovery of gold sparked rapid and diverse waves of immigration westward, displacing the already established pastoral Mexican society. Almaguer shows how the confrontation between white immigrants and the Mexican "ranchero" and working class populations was also a contestation over racial status in which racialization influenced and was in turn influenced by class position in the changing economic order. Partly because of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which granted U.S. citizenship and other rights, parts of the Mexican population were integrated into the emerging Anglo society more easily than other racialized groups. A case study of Ventura County highlights declining political and economic fortunes of the Mexican elite while showing how Mexican, Japanese, Chinese, and Indian populations were permanently relegated to the bottom of the class structure as unskilled manual workers.
The fate of the Native American population provides perhaps the most extreme example of white supremacy during the period. Popular conceptions of Native Americans as "uncivilized and "heathen," justified the killing of more than 8,000 men, women, and children between 1848 and 1870. Many survivors were incorporated at the periphery of Anglo society, often as indentured laborers and virtual slaves.
Underpinning the institutional structuring of white supremacy were notions such as "manifest destiny," the inherent good of the capitalist wage-system, and the superiority of Christianity and Euro-American culture, all of which helped to marginalize non white groups in California and justify Anglo-American class dominance. As other racialized groups assumed new roles, Almaguer assesses the complex interplay between economic forces and racial attitudes that simultaneously structured and allocated "group position" in the new social hierarchy.
California remains a contested racial frontier, as political struggles over the rights and opportunities of different groups continue to reverberate along racial lines. "Racial Fault Lines" is an invaluable contribution to our understanding of ethnicity and class in America, and the social construction of "race" in the Far West.


Author: Robert D. Richardson Jr.
Publisher: University of California Press
Release: 1988
Summary: If you want to get your mind around Thoreau's mind and the more significant facts of his life, buy and read this book. Because the chapters are brief but meaty, and because Richardson's an accomplished prose stylist in his own right, this book is a joy to read and, I have found, is wonderful to come back to periodically, particularly when looking for a great way to spend ten to twenty extra minutes profitably.

Author: Stephen King
Publisher: Gramercy
Release: 2001
Summary: In 1978, science fiction writer Spider Robinson wrote a scathing review of "The Stand" in which he exhorted his readers to grab strangers in bookstores and beg them not to buy it.
"The Stand" is like that. You either love it or hate it, but you can't ignore it. Stephen King's most popular book, according to polls of his fans, is an end-of-the-world scenario: a rapidly mutating flu virus is accidentally released from a U.S. military facility and wipes out 99 and 44/100 percent of the world's population, thus setting the stage for an apocalyptic confrontation between Good and Evil.
"I "love" to burn things up," King says. "It's the werewolf in me, I guess.... "The Stand" was particularly fulfilling, because there I got a chance to scrub the whole human race, and man, it was fun! ... Much of the compulsive, driven feeling I had while I worked on "The Stand" came from the vicarious thrill of imagining an entire entrenched social order destroyed in one stroke."
There is much to admire in "The Stand": the vivid thumbnail sketches with which King populates a whole landscape with dozens of believable characters; the deep sense of nostalgia for things left behind; the way it subverts our sense of reality by showing us a world we find familiar, then flipping it over to reveal the darkness underneath. Anyone who wants to know, or claims to know, the heart of the American experience needs to read this book. "--Fiona Webster"


Author: Kurt Selegmann
Publisher: Gramercy
Release: 1997
Summary: From the demons of Mesopotamia to those plaguing our own late-20th-century civilization, this comprehensive primer covers every aspect of magic and the occult since earliest recorded time. Spanning 5,000 years of world history it covers every major civilization and includes sections on alchemy, the Devil, witchcraft, the cabala, astrology, the tarot, the Rosicrucians, Nostradamus, and vampires. Profusely illustrated with nearly 170 black-and-white illustrations.

Author: Stanislav Grof
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
Release: 1980
Summary: BEYOND DEATH is a visual feast of worldwide artwork throughout history depicting scenes of the soul's passage into the afterlife and through the trials and tribulations of purgatory or hell into the eventual bliss of paradise. The text and illustrations also apply, to a substantial extent, to the death-and-rebirth process a person typically goes through during psychedlic therapy; there is a tie-in to a lesser extent to near-death experiences, shamanic initiation, and mystical experiences especially as occur in psychosis/schizophrenia.
I have found the pictures inspiring, and the text informative, as over the past fifteen years I've journeyed on my own path (involving safe, legal psychedelic therapy complemented with hyperventilation therapy and other techniques to grow psychospiritually). The paintings in the pages of this book have repeatedly brought me reassurance that the hellish nightmares as well as blissful heavens of my own life are all actually universal, natural experiences that every person may pass through, if not in this life on earth, then in the next.
I highly recommend this gem of a book with its artistic treasures (and complementary text), both for enhancement of one's life now, and preparation and reassurance for the journey that lies at the end of this life.
Other books I enjoy are Stanislav Grof's masterwork BEYOND THE BRAIN: BIRTH, DEATH, AND TRANSENDENCE IN PSYCHOTHERAPY, the author's conclusions and insights on how birth affects a person throughout their life and how to heal, based on his seventeen years as a pioneering LSD psychotherapist; Sandra Ingerman's SOUL RETRIEVAL: MENDING THE FRAGMENTED SELF, a modern shamanic view of reclaiming one's lost "inner-child" self; Betty Eadie's near-death bestseller EMBRACED BY THE LIGHT; and STORMY SEARCH FOR THE SELF by Christina and Stanislav Grof, telling of her kundlini/alcoholism crisis, and how similar psychospiritual crises can be initiated by UFO/ET encounters, mystical or near-death experiences, awakening of psychic powers or channeling or spirit guides, shamanic "illness," and other events, all unsought and spontaneous--and all often mis-diagnosed as psychosis...yet all can be worked through to positive resolution and a new spiritual-psychological awakening.


Author: Marija Gimbutas, Joseph Campbell
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
Release: 2001
Summary: "The first authoritative work on the ancient goddess culture."—"Boston Globe"

The Goddess is the most potent and persistent feature in the archaeological records of the ancient world, a symbol of the unity of life in nature and the personification of all that was sacred and mysterious on earth.

In this pioneering and provocative volume, Marija Gimbutas resurrects the world of the Goddess-worshipping, earth-centered cultures, bringing ancient matriarchal society vividly to life. She interweaves comparative mythology, early historical sources, linguistics, ethnography, and folklore to demonstrate conclusively that Goddess-worship is at the root of Western civilization. Illustrated with nearly 2,000 symbolic artifacts, Gimbutas' magnum opus is at once a "pictorial script" of the prehistoric Goddess religion and an authoritative work that takes these ancient cultures from the realm of speculation into that of documented fact. Over 500 illustrations.


Author: John F. Michell
Publisher: Thames & Hudson
Release: 2001
Summary: "The View Over Atlantis", John Michell's unrivaled introduction to megalithic science, earth mysteries, and the inner meaning of number and measure, was described by Colin Wilson as "one of the great seminal books of our generation—a book which will be argued about for decades to come." Across much of the globe are ancient earthworks and stone monuments built for an unknown purpose. Their shared features suggest that they were originally part of a worldwide system, and John Michell argues that they served the elemental science of the archaic civilization that Plato referred to as Atlantis. In this connection the most significant modern discovery is that of "leys," the mysterious network of straight lines that link the ancient places of Britain and have their counterparts in China, Australia, South America, and elsewhere. John Michell's studies of ancient measures have enabled him to define their exact values. The same units recur in the dimensions of monuments all over the world, from Stonehenge to Teotihuacán, and reveal the builders' knowledge of the size and shape of the spheroidal earth, and with it the outlines of their cosmology. 82 b/w illustrations.

Author: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Publisher: Dover Publications
Release: 2004
Summary:

Author: Arthur Avalon
Publisher: Dover Publications
Release: 1974
Summary: Written by a leading authority on Shaktic and Tantric thought, this book is considered the prime document for study and application of Kundalini yoga. It probes the philosophical and mythological nature of Kundalini; the esoteric anatomy associated with it; the study of mantras; the chakras, or psychic centers in the human body; the associated yoga and much, much more. Two important Tantric documents are included: The Description of the Six Chakras and Five-fold Footstool.


Author: Emile Grillot De Givry
Publisher: Dover Publications
Release: 1971
Summary: Incredible amount of information on sorcerers, bonds with the devil, the kabbalah, alchemy, similar topics. 360 illus., mostly unavailable elsewhere.


Author: Tina Marie Campt
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Release: 2003
Summary: It's hard to imagine an issue or image more riveting than Black Germans during the Third Reich. Yet accounts of their lives are virtually nonexistent, despite the fact that they lived through a regime dedicated to racial purity.
Tina Campt's Other Germans tells the story of this largely forgotten group of individuals, with important distinctions from other accounts. Most strikingly, Campt centers her arguments on race, rather than anti-semitism. She also provides oral history as background for her study, interviewing two Black Germans for the book.
In the end, the author comes face to face with an inevitable question: Is there a relationship between the history of Black Germans and those of other black communities?
The answers to Campt's questions make Other Germans essential reading in the emerging study of what it meant to be black and German in the context of a society that looked at anyone with non-German blood as racially impure at best.
Tina Campt is Associate Professor of Women's Studies at Duke University.


Author: Nancy Vonk, Janet Kestin
Publisher: Wiley
Release: 2005
Summary: Advertising is a fantastic industry, but actually getting a job (or even your foot in the door) can seem next to impossible. Whether you're a student or a young professional loaded with questions, this one-of-a-kind guide shows you how to land a job and how to thrive once you're in and the pressure is on.
Authors Nancy Vonk and Janet Kestin are seasoned creative directors and longtime creative partners. In Pick Me, these industry leaders answer your toughest ad career questions, like: Is advertising right for me? How do I build a killer portfolio? How do I get an interview with the elusive creative director? Should I accept an unpaid internship? How do I find the right partner? How do I beat creative block? How do I avoid burnout?
Plus, fourteen industry superstars share their insights and explain how they broke into the business. You'll hear from Bob Barrie, Rick Boyko, David Droga, Mark Fenske, Neil French, Sally Hogshead, Mike Hughes, Shane Hutton, Brian Millar, Tom Monahan, Chuck Porter, Bob Scarpelli, Chris Staples, and Lorraine Tao.
Forget the clichés this is advertising as it really is. If you're hell-bent on making it, this informative guide will put you on track for a career in one of the most exciting businesses on the planet.


Author: Jon G. Allen
Publisher: Wiley John & Sons Inc
Release: 2001
Summary: Mental, physical, or sexual abuse in close personal relationships commonly results in trauma that is very different from the trauma of accidents, illness, or war. Making creative use of attachment theory to explicate the multifaceted outcomes of trauma, this book provides a powerful conceptual framework and a concise, masterly review of a huge knowledge base. Encyclopedic in scope and scholarly in its up-to-the-minute survey of research findings.


Author: P. Alex Linley
Publisher: Wiley
Release: 2004
Summary: A thorough and up-to-date guide to putting positive psychology into practice
From the Foreword: "This volume is the cutting edge of positive psychology and the emblem of its future."
-Martin E. P. Seligman, Ph.D., Fox Leadership Professor of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, and author of "Authentic Happiness"
Positive psychology is an exciting new orientation in the field, going beyond psychology's traditional focus on illness and pathology to look at areas like well-being and fulfillment. While the larger question of optimal human functioning is hardly new - Aristotle addressed it in his treatises on eudaimonia - positive psychology offers a common language on this subject to professionals working in a variety of subdisciplines and practices. Applicable in many settings and relevant for individuals, groups, organizations, communities, and societies, positive psychology is a genuinely integrative approach to professional practice.
"Positive Psychology in Practice" fills the need for a broad, comprehensive, and state-of-the-art reference for this burgeoning new perspective. Cutting across traditional lines of thinking in psychology, this resource bridges theory, research, and applications to offer valuable information to a wide range of professionals and students in the social and behavioral sciences.
A group of major international contributors covers: The applied positive psychology perspective Historical and philosophical foundations Values and choices in pursuit of the good life Lifestyle practices for health and well-being Methods and processes for teaching and learning Positive psychology at work The best and most thorough treatment of this cutting-edge discipline, "Positive Psychology in Practice" is an essential resource for understanding this important new theory and applying its principles to all areas of professional practice.


Author: Abraham H. Maslow
Publisher: Wiley
Release: 2000
Summary: Includes Original Essays & Letters
"The more evolved and psychologically healthy people get, the more will enlightened management policy be necessary in order to survive in competition and the more handicapped will be an enterprise with an authoritarian policy."-Abraham Maslow

In a world in which each new day brings a new management theory or strategic proposition, the timeless ideas of Abraham Maslow resonate with unimpeachable insight and clarity. Dr. Maslow, the pioneer behind elemental concepts including the hierarchy of needs and the human search for self-actualization, innately understood that the goals and passions that so impact humans in their everyday life could be just as applicable-and his own findings just as valuable-in the work environment.

The Maslow Business Reader collects Maslow's essays and letters for his many devoted adherents, and introduces his published and unpublished works to readers unfamiliar with Maslow's management breakthroughs. From recognizing and warning against management's natural progression to mechanize the human organization to brilliant discussions of human motivation, Dr. Maslow never fails to instantly recognize the heart and soul of each matter and provide direct, across-the-board solutions.

Abraham Maslow's contributions to behavioral science shine on every page. In notes and articles, as well as personal letters to icons B. F. Skinner, John D. Rockefeller II, and others, The Maslow Business Reader provides his outlook on:
* Management and leadership issues such as customer loyalty, entrepreneurship, and the importance of communication
* Ways to build a work environment conducive to creativity, innovation, and maximized individual contributions
* Techniques for finding comfort in change and ambiguity, and using them to spur creativity and innovation

Amid today's impressive technological innovations, business leaders sometimes forget that work is-at its core-a fundamental human endeavor. The Maslow Business Reader reminds us of Dr. Abraham Maslow's towering contribution to the understanding of human behavior and motivation, and how his efforts can lead to a greater understanding of the twenty-first-century workplace-and the workers who call it home.

An important analysis of workplace motivation-from the twentieth century's most influential behavioral expert

Abraham Maslow is renowned-and rightfully so-for his pioneering work on the hierarchy of needs and the human drive for self-actualization. As today's worker increasingly equates professional success with personal satisfaction and fulfillment, Dr. Maslow's words and ideas have become recognized for their wisdom and prescience on performance improvement and management/employee relationships.

The Maslow Business Reader collects Abraham Maslow's most instructive, intuitive thoughts and essays into one important volume. Assembled from the wealth of behavioral research and analysis Dr. Maslow left upon his death in 1970, the enclosed selections reveal a man comfortable with his position in history, tireless in his efforts to better understand what truly makes humans strive to reach their potential, and gifted in his ability to translate the most profound concepts and realities into entertaining, thought-provoking prose.

Abraham Maslow is still regarded as the modern world's most articulate, insightful authority on human behavior and motivation. Discover his beliefs and conclusions on worker drives and motivations-as applicable today as when they were first written-in The Maslow Business Reader.


Author: Tom Strachan, Andrew P. Read
Publisher: Wiley-Liss
Release: 1999
Summary: Human Molecular Genetics 2 Tom Strachan & Andrew P. Read "truly a Rolls Royce amongst textbooks" — Molecular Medicine Today "the best text to introduce students and scientists to the molecular aspects of human genetics" — Trends in Genetics "a beautifully crafted book" — Journal of Medical Genetics "addresses the gap between introductory textbooks and the primary literature. There's no other textbook quite like it." — Nature Now extensively rewritten and updated, HMG2 guides students and researchers through the very latest developments in the most rapidly changing area of life science. The highly regarded structure of the bestselling first edition is retained, but a wealth of new data and features have been added to aid understanding of the principles of human molecular genetics:new material on cell types and the cell cycle, signal transduction, DNA mutation repair, and comparative genomics and evolutionnew material on recent advances in the study of gene expression and function, including the use of DNA microarraysthe latest Genome Project data including an assessment of the impact of complete genome sequences and new approaches in functional genomicsexpanded coverage of common disease susceptibilitynew section on how best to obtain the latest data from web-based resourcesa range of new figures, with many more in full colorthe early use of hierarchical figures and flow charts to introduce principles described fully in later chaptersnew two-column layout to improve clarity furtherreferences systematically updatedHMG2 is the book of choice for readers requiring an authoritative and integrated approach to human genetics.

Author: Abraham H. Maslow
Publisher: Wiley
Release: 1998
Summary: "If we wish to help humans to become more fully human, we must realize not only that they try to realize themselves, but that they are also reluctant or afraid or unable to do so. Only by fully appreciating this dialectic between sickness and health can we help to tip the balance in favor of health." -Abraham Maslow
Abraham Maslow's theories of self-actualization and the hierarchy of human needs are the cornerstone of modern humanistic psychology, and no book so well epitomizes those ideas as his classic Toward a Psychology of Being.
A profound book, an exciting book, its influence continues to spread, more than a quarter century after its author's death, beyond psychology and throughout the humanities, social theory, and business management theory.
Of course, the book's enduring popularity stems from the important questions it raises and the answers it provides concerning what is fundamental to human nature and psychological well-being, and what is needed to promote, maintain, and restore mental and emotional well-being. But its success also has to do with Maslow's unique ability to convey difficult philosophical concepts with passion, precision, and astonishing clarity, and, through the power of his words, to ignite in readers a sense of creative joy and wholeness toward which we, as beings capable of self-actualization, strive.
This Third Edition makes Abraham Maslow's ideas accessible to a new generation of psychology students, as well as businesspeople, managers, and trainers interested in applying the study of human behavior to management techniques.
An energetic and articulate scholar, Professor Maslow was the author of more than twenty books, including Eupsychian Management; Psychology of Science; Religions, Values, and Peak Experiences; Motivation and Personality; and Principles of Abnormal Psychology (with B. Mittelmann). He also edited New Knowledge in Human Values and wrote nearly one hundred articles. His teachings continue to be a staple for psychologists and psychology students.
"Capacities clamor to be used, and cease their clamor only when they are well used. . . . Not only is it fun to use our capacities, but it is necessary for growth. The unused skill or capacity or organ can become a disease center or else atrophy or disappear, thus diminishing the person." -Abraham Maslow
Toward a Psychology of Being, Third Edition
Abraham Maslow doesn't pretend to have easy answers, absolutes, or solutions that bring the relief of finality-but he does have a deep belief in people. In this Third Edition of Toward a Psychology of Being (the original edition sold well over 100,000 copies), there is a constant optimistic thrust toward a future based on the intrinsic values of humanity. Professor Maslow states that, "This inner nature, as much as we know of it so far, seems not to be intrinsically evil, but rather either neutral or positively 'good.' What we call evil behavior appears most often to be a secondary reaction to frustration of this intrinsic nature." He demonstrates that human beings can be loving, noble, and creative, and are capable of pursuing the highest values and aspirations.
This Third Edition will bring Professor Maslow's ideas to a whole new generation of business and psychology readers, as well as anyone interested in the study of human behavior.


Author: Christopher Hale
Publisher: Wiley
Release: 2003
Summary: "As the Indiana Jones films showed, Nazis, new age mumbo-jumbo and exotic locations are a formula that works. Christopher Hale's gripping and well-researched tale of an SS-sponsored scientific mission to Tibet in 1938-39 has the whole shebang: mad occult beliefs, mountains, strange charactors called Bruno or Ernst and stomach-churning concentration camp experiments to round things off."
—"The Sunday Times" (London)
A scientific expedition or a sinister mission?
Why would the leader of the Nazi’s dreaded SS, the second-most-powerful man in the Third Reich, send a zoologist, an anthropologist, and several other scientists to Tibet on the eve of war? "Himmler’s Crusade" tells the bizarre and chilling story one of history’s most perverse, eccentric, and frightening scientific expeditions. Drawing on private journals, new interviews, and original research in German archives as well as in Tibet, author Christopher Hale recreates the events of this sinister expedition, asks penetrating questions about the relationship between science and politics, a nd sheds new light on the occult theories that obsessed Himmler and his fellow Nazis.
Combining the highest standards of narrative history with the high adventure and exotic locales of "Raiders of the Lost Ark, Himmler’s Crusade" reveals that Himmler had ordered these men to examine Tibetan nobles for signs of Aryan physiology, undermine the British relationship with the ruling class, and sow the seeds of rebellion among the populace. Most strangely, the scientists–all SS officers–were to find scientific proof of a grotesque historical fantasy that was at the center of Himmler’s beliefs about race.
Set against the exquisite backdrop of the majestic Himalayas, this fast-paced and engaging narrative provides new and troubling insight into one of the strangest episodes in the history of science, politics, and war.


Author: Abraham H. Maslow
Publisher: Wiley
Release: 1998
Summary: Anyone who has sat through a psychology course has seen Abraham H. Maslow's hierarchy of needs, a pyramid capped by the highest human need of all, the need for, what Maslow famously termed, self-actualization. Since his death in 1970, Maslow's voluminous writings have made him one of the most influential thinkers in counseling psychology. He is a revered father figure to the human potential movement. But few know him as a brilliantly insightful analyst of how to lead people and make organizations more productive. "Maslow on Management" should change that.
In 1962, Maslow spent the summer at an electronics factory that was one of the first to try giving workers a say in organizing production. He watched and kept a journal, later published under the intimidating title "Eupsychian Management". The book, which had been long out of print, has been republished with extensive commentaries as "Maslow on Management".
Some of "Maslow on Management" is, as Warren Bennis writes in the foreword, "hilariously innocent." Reflecting on the power of well-managed workplaces to unleash creativity, Maslow suggests that the U.S. economy would benefit "if we kept all the factories running at full blast and simply gave things away." Yet his deeper point--that good management leads to good psychological health--is startlingly advanced for 1962, when the business world was still widely thought of as nurturing nothing more than soulless conformity. He was surprisingly prescient, too, in warning that participatory management taken to excess becomes sloppy and weak. While encouraging open communication, an effective leader "should have the power and the ability to keep his mouth shut," Maslow writes. He advises that gentle, permissive management is fine if workers share democratic values, but if not, "break their backs immediately."
Full of rambling, half-finished thoughts and provocative speculations, "Maslow on Management" is no nine-step plan for building winning work teams. But anyone seriously interested in understanding management will find the book useful as a fascinating reflection of a brilliant mind thinking deeply about the nature and purpose of work. "--Barry Mitzman"


Author: Renato D. Alarcón, Edward F. Foulks, Mark Vakkur
Publisher: Wiley
Release: 1998
Summary: What role do cultures play in the development
Can behavior that is normative in one culture be mistaken for a personality disorder in another?
Can an entire culture be said to suffer from a personality disorder?
Personality Disorders and Culture explores these questions and many more. It reviews the worldwide literature on the subject and covers all aspects of the links between culture and personality disorder. Stressing the importance of cultural awareness for mental health professionals in multicultural societies, this groundbreaking book sets forth a dimensional model of the ways in which a cultural perspective can inform our understanding of personality development and personality disorders. The authors assess the cultural foundations of the pathogenesis of these disorders and identify social and cultural practices that contribute to the development of personality styles.
Interpreting concrete information on personality disorders, this book presents findings on the epidemiology of personality disorders in different clinical settings and evaluates them critically from the cultural perspective. It also analyzes cross-national comparisons and discusses cultural influences and their decisive role in the diagnosis and classification of personality disorders.
Finally, Personality Disorders and Culture examines the role of culture in interpreting and explaining behaviors that resemble personality disorders but are, instead, normative to a given culture. It also reveals how culture can be used to devise effective therapeutic interventions at individual and group levels in a variety of settings and explains why cultural concepts and practices should be an integral component of and can have a powerful positive effect on the structure, delivery, and management of care systems for personality disorders.
For clinicians, researchers, and anyone interested in understanding personality from a cultural perspective, Personality Disorders and Culture is an indispensable resource. It is also an excellent textbook for graduate and upper-level undergraduate courses in anthropology, psychology, sociology, diagnosis, and clinical treatment.
Acclaim for Personality Disorders and Culture"
"Expanding on its origins with profound innovations, Personality Disorders and Culture is a much awaited treatment of a subject that has held center stage in our field for decades. Written with verve and insight, I found I could not put the book down. It has brought the subject alive...and will serve as a stimulating text for graduate students and residents equally in this day of multicultural studies."" -Theodore Millon, PhD, Dean and Director, Institute for Advanced Studies in Personology and Psychotherapy
""A groundbreaking contribution, this book gives us the first comprehensive analysis of the effects of culture on personality and significantly advances the field. I strongly recommend Personality Disorders and Culture."" -Lillian Comas-Díaz, PhD, Director, Transcultural Mental Health Institute, Editor, Cultural Diversity and Mental Health"
"Ever since the DSM-III in 1980 presented the Axis structure for mental disorders, there has been a critical need to develop the Axis II disorders. The authors of this interesting volume, oriented toward cultural concepts and research, have brought some of the most advanced ideas to bear on personality disorders. The book is instructive and deserves thoughtful consideration."" -Lloyd R. Rogler, PhD, Albert Schweitzer University, Professor Fordham University"
"Personality Disorders and Culture is an excellent contribution to the field. It offers new and unique perspectives on the treatment of personality disorders within a cultural framework. This book is an invaluable clinical resource for mental health professionals."" -Pedro Ruíz, MD, Professor and Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs, The University of Texas, Houston"
"An unusually fine integration of disciplinary perspectives including psychiatry, cultural anthropology, and psychology-especially personality theory-in an innovative mix that elucidates personality disorders in unique and significant ways. It is equally valuable to the scholar and the clinician because it contributes an understanding of personality disorders that transcends the limited and generally inadequate views found in the current literature in each discipline. The depth and breadth of the treatises in this book are a delight to the reader!"" -Joan D. Koss-Chioino, PhD, Professor and Director Program in Medical Anthropology, Arizona State University"
"A wide-ranging integration of recent thought on personality, culture, and psychopathology certain to be of great value to clinicians and researchers looking for culturally relevant approaches to psychiatry."" -Laurence J. Kirmayer, MD, Professor and Director, Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, McGill University, Editor in Chief, Transcultural Psychiatry


Author: John Bowlby
Publisher: Basic Books
Release: 2000
Summary: Dr. Bowlby's second pioneering volume examines the effect of seperation on the development of the child and the psychopathology that often follows seperation.

Author: Daniel N. Stern
Publisher: Basic Books
Release: 2000
Summary: Challenging the traditional developmental sequence as well as the idea that issues of attachment, dependency, and trust are confined to infancy, Stern integrates clinical and experimental science to support his revolutionizing vision of the social and emotional life of the youngest children, which has had spiraling implications for theory, research, and practice. A new introduction by the author celebrates this first paperback edition.

Author: Bruce W. Scotton
Publisher: Basic Books
Release: 1996
Summary: I am trying to learn more about transpersonal psychology and transpersonal practices. This book more than did the trick. It gave a good overview of the different angles the field touches. It gave great anectdotal stories as well. It is defineity a must have. It introduced many of the fathers of the field and there perspectives; Jung, Maslow, Wilber, Freud, Assogolini. It also showed the contributions of spirtiual traditions:Buddhism, Hinduism, Shamanism, Christianity, Kabbalah. It introduced many techniques used:guided imagery, past life regression, meditation, breathwork, psychedelics.

Author: Plato
Publisher: Basic Books
Release: 1991
Summary: Long regarded as the most accurate rendering of Plato's "Republic" that has yet been published, this widely acclaimed work is the first strictly literal translation of a timeless classic. This second edition includes a new introduction by Professor Bloom, whose careful translation and interpretation of "The Republic" was first published in 1968. In addition to the correct text itself there is also a rich and valuable essay--as well as indexes and a glossary of terms--which will better enable the reader to approach the heart of Plato's intention.

Author: Karl Ernest Meyer, Shareen Blair Brysac
Publisher: Perseus Books Group
Release: 2006
Summary: Throughout the 19th century and well into the 20th, the Russian and British Empires played out a chess game of diplomacy, espionage, and military thrusts into Central Asia to protect their expanding interests. When play began, the frontiers of their empires lay 2,000 miles apart, across vast deserts and almost impassable mountain ranges; by the end, they were separated by only 20 miles. Karl E. Meyer of "The New York Times" and Shareen Blair Brysac, documentary filmmaker for CBS, update and significantly expand earlier studies of the imperial rivalry, notably Peter Hopkirk's pioneering "The Great Game". "Tournament of Shadows" reads like a racy adventure story, yet there is no need for the authors to embellish their well-researched facts. The region attracted a host of bizarre characters, each with his own idiosyncratic goals. The authors begin with the journey to Bokhara of an ambitious horse doctor, hired by the East India Company in 1806 to improve its breeding stock, and end with the CIA's assistance to anti-Chinese guerrillas in Tibet during the cold war. American participants in the opening of Central Asia have not previously received much attention, but "Tournament of Shadows" introduces adventurers such as William Rockhill, commissioned by the Smithsonian Institution in the 1880s to explore Tibet, and William McGovern, who, to the chagrin of the British, reached Lhasa in 1923. The wealth and instability of Central Asia continue to keep the region in the headlines, motivating the Soviet Union's disastrous 10-year intervention in Afghanistan and fueling an international race for resources--especially oil--today. "--John Stevenson"

Author: John Bowlby
Publisher: Basic Books
Release: 1982
Summary: This third volume in Bowlby's groundbreaking trilogy on child development examines the effects of a death in the family on the lives of children and adults.

Author: Richard J. Evans
Publisher: Basic Books
Release: 2002
Summary: An illumination of one of the most explosive and publicized "holocaust trials" since that of Adolf Eichmann, by a leading historian who acted as chief adviser to the defense
In ruling against the controversial historian David Irving, whose libel suit against the American historian Deborah Lipstadt was tried in April 2000, the High Court in London labeled Irving a falsifier of history. No objective historian, declared the judge, would manipulate the documentary record in the way that Irving did. Richard J. Evans, a Cambridge historian and the chief adviser for the defense, uses this famous trial as a lens for exploring a range of difficult questions about the nature of the historian's enterprise.


Author: John Bowlby
Publisher: Basic Books
Release: 2000
Summary: The first volume of John Bowlby's "Attachment " and "Loss" series examines the nature of the child's ties to the mother. Beginning with a discussion of instinctive behavior, its causation, functioning, and ontogeny, Bowlby proceeds to a theoretical formulation of attachment behavior--how it develops, how it is maintained, what functions it fulfills.
In the fifteen years since "Attachment" was first published, there have been major developments in both theoretical discussion and empirical research on attachment. The second edition, with two wholly new chapters and substantial revisions, incorporates these developments and assesses their importance to attachment theory.


Author: H.G. Wells
Publisher: J.M. Dent & Sons
Release:
Summary: A shipwreck in the South Seas, a palm-tree paradise where a mad doctor conducts vile experiments, animals that become human and then "beastly" in ways they never were before--it's the stuff of high adventure. It's also a parable about Darwinian theory, a social satire in the vein of Jonathan Swift ("Gulliver's Travels"), and a bloody tale of horror. Or, as H. G. Wells himself wrote about this story, ""The Island of Dr. Moreau" is an exercise in youthful blasphemy. Now and then, though I rarely admit it, the universe projects itself towards me in a hideous grimace. It grimaced that time, and I did my best to express my vision of the aimless torture in creation." This colorful tale by the author of "The Time Machine", "The Invisible Man", and "The War of the Worlds" lit a firestorm of controversy at the time of its publication in 1896.

Author: Deborah E. Lipstadt
Publisher: Plume
Release: 1994
Summary: For all those who are curious about the growing movement known as Holocaust Denial (often disguised under the veil of Holocaust Revisionism) then this is a must-read. Rather than refute each individual point made by Holocaust Deniers (an important task none the less), Deborah Lipstadt traces the history and evolution of Holocaust Denial to its present form whilst exposing the hidden(?) anti-Semitic agenda that is at the very core of the movement.

Very well written and documented, it is also a rather disturbing read but vital if we are too understand the motives of these pseudo historians and prevent a very ghastly chapter of history from repeating itself.


Author: Charles Darwin
Publisher: Signet Classics
Release: 2003
Summary: The book that shook the world
First time from Signet Classic

This is the book that revolutionized the natural sciences and every literary, philosophical and religious thinker who followed. Darwin's theory of evolution and the descent of man remains as controversial and influential today as when it was published over a century ago.


Author:
Publisher: Signet Classics
Release: 2002
Summary: The Bhagavad-Gita is the Gospel of Hinduism, and one of the great religious classics of the world. Its simple, vivid message is a daily inspiration in the lives of millions throughout the world and has been so for countless generations.

Here is a distinguished translation that can be read by every person, not as an archaic monument to an ancient culture, but as a living contemporary message that touches the most urgent personal and social problems.


Author: Ayn Rand
Publisher: Signet
Release: 1996
Summary: At last, Ayn Rand's masterpiece is available to her millions of loyal readers in trade paperback.

With this acclaimed work and its immortal query, "Who is John Galt?", Ayn Rand found the perfect artistic form to express her vision of existence. Atlas Shrugged made Rand not only one of the most popular novelists of the century, but one of its most influential thinkers.

"Atlas Shrugged" is the astounding story of a man who said that he would stop the motor of the world--and did. Tremendous in scope, breathtaking in its suspense, "Atlas Shrugged" stretches the boundaries further than any book you have ever read. It is a mystery, not about the murder of a man's body, but about the murder--and rebirth--of man's spirit.

* Atlas Shrugged is the "second most influential book for Americans today" after the Bible, according to a joint survey conducted by the Library of Congress and the Book of the Month Club


Author: Ayn Rand
Publisher: Signet
Release: 1964
Summary: This is one of Ms Rand's best non fiction works. It applies her objectivist philosophy to a wide range of practical issues in both publc and private life. This is not light reading--this is pure brain food for the reader in search of humane letters and excellent principles of human relationships.

Author: Suroosh Alvi, Gavin Mcinnes, Shane Smith, Suroosh Avi
Publisher: Warner Books
Release: 2003
Summary: What started out as a few twenty-something drug addicts writing a newsletter and scamming welfare-to-work programs in the mid-nineties has become a global empire of hedonism that includes a magazine, a chain of retail stores, a clothing line, Vice Films, Vice TV, Vice Records, and viceland.com. A compilation of the magazines best articles over the past decade, the book includes hilarious, edgy, and informative guides to sex, music and the party scene. With outtakes and photos from their most famous issues, The Vice Guide....is an irreverent look at an outrageous cultural phenomenon. The Vice Guide....will appeal to the same audience who made bestsellers of The Onion, The Darwin Awards, and The Hipster Handbook. With a circulation of 200,000 this free monthly had taken its place alongside Rolling Stone and Spin, establishing itself as the voice of a generation. It was named the #1 trendsetting magazine for females 19-24 and #2 for males 25-30 by the Cassandra Report marketing survey. The Vice web site, viceland.com, has 80,000 unique users per month. Vice has signed with New Line Cinema to write and produce their own feature films. They have also signed with Atlantic Records to develop their own label and with Showtime to develop a comedy series.

Author: James Hillman
Publisher: Warner Books
Release: 1997
Summary: James Hillman, a former director of the Jung Institute who has written more than 20 books on behavior and psychology, delves into human development in "The Soul's Code". Hillman encourages you to "grow down" into the earth, as an acorn does when it becomes a mighty oak tree. He argues that character and calling are the result of "the particularity you feel to be you" and knocks those who blame childhood difficulties for all their problems as adults. According to Hillman, "The current American identity as a victim is the flip side of the coin whose head brightly displays the opposite identity: the heroic self-made man, carving out destiny alone and with unflagging will." Hillman's theories seem disarmingly simple, but he backs them with a careful, well-practiced intellect.

Author: James Redfield
Publisher: Warner Books
Release: 1995
Summary: Find out for yourself why virtually everyone you know has this book, described as an "adventure in pursuit of a spiritual mystery", on their coffee table. In the tradition of Carlos Castaneda's The Teachings of Don Juan.

Author: James Redfield
Publisher: Warner Books
Release: 1999
Summary: Author James Redfield takes readers to the mountains of Tibet in search of the mythical place called Shambhala, otherwise known as Shangri-La. Like his previous bestselling books, Redfield holds the tension between an adventure travel story (in this book, armed Chinese soldiers doggedly pursue him) and divine encounters. Rather than preach his spiritual beliefs, Redfield likes to portray himself as a naive pilgrim, receiving wisdom and insights from the various guides and teachers he meets on his metaphysical journeys.
Shambhala is indeed a paradise, just as it was lovingly portrayed in the famous James Hilton novel "Lost Horizon". It is also a spiritual utopia, and Redfield takes great pleasure in pondering the possibilities of living in a culture that is entirely "focused on the life process." Residents explain their lifestyle, which has emerged from a completely spiritual culture, including some rather sensible opinions about technology, parenting, and even genetic testing. Meanwhile, Redfield remains the wide-eyed observer. Those who loved the characters, writing style, and epiphanies in "The Celestine Prophecy" will not be disappointed with Redfield's latest inspirational portrait of a new world order. "--Gail Hudson"


Author: William Gibson
Publisher: Ace
Release: 1986
Summary: Here is the novel that started it all, launching the cyberpunk generation, and the first novel to win the holy trinity of science fiction: the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award and the Philip K. Dick Award. With "Neuromancer", William Gibson introduced the world to cyberspace--and science fiction has never been the same.
Case was the hottest computer cowboy cruising the information superhighway--jacking his consciousness into cyberspace, soaring through tactile lattices of data and logic, rustling encoded secrets for anyone with the money to buy his skills. Then he double-crossed the wrong people, who caught up with him in a big way--and burned the talent out of his brain, micron by micron. Banished from cyberspace, trapped in the meat of his physical body, Case courted death in the high-tech underworld. Until a shadowy conspiracy offered him a second chance--and a cure--for a price....


Author: Carl Gustav Jung
Publisher: Laurel
Release: 1968
Summary: Illustrated throughout with revealing images, this is the first and only work in which the world-famous Swiss psychologist explains to the layperson his enormously influential theory of symbolism as revealed in dreams.

Author: Deborah Blum
Publisher: Berkley Trade
Release: 2004
Summary: We take it for granted today that babies need love. But less than a century ago, psychologists warned women against showing their children "too much affection"-predicting dire consequences ranging from deadly disease to sexual dysfunction in adulthood. The story of how this conventional wisdom was finally shattered takes us into the life and the laboratory of Harry Harlow-workaholic, alcoholic, brilliant and brave, capable of caustic wit and cruelty-and into an era in which the scientific establishment was just beginning to understand the power of human emotion.

Author: Pierre Arnaud
Publisher: Spon Press
Release: 1998
Summary:
This book examines the shaping of sports by both the fascist and communist institutions of Europe during the interwar period. It shows how sports were used as an instrument of propaganda and psychological pressure by major political and sporting nations.


Author: Phillip Lucas
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Release: 2004
Summary:
"New Religious Movements in the Twenty-First Century" examines the urgent issues facing new religions in their political, legal and religious contexts. New religious movements, from novel sects within larger global traditions such as Islam, Christianity, or Buddhism to the growth and spread of minority religions, are proliferating in nearly every region of the world and are increasingly coming into contact with social and institutional resistance that is far reaching in its implications. With essays from prominent scholars and usefully organized into four regional areas covering Western Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, Russia and Eastern Europe, and North and South America, as well as a concluding section on the major themes of globalization and terrorist violence, this book provides invaluable insight into the challenges facing religion in the twenty-first century.


Author: John J. Stuhr
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 2002
Summary:
"Pragmatism, Postmodernism and the Future of Philosophy" is a vigorous and dynamic confrontation with the task and temperament of philosophy today. In this energetic and far-reaching new book, Stuhr draws persuasively on the resources of the pragmatist tradition of James and Dewey, and critically engages the work of Continental philosophers like Adorno, Foucault, and Deleuze, to explore fundamental questions of how we might think and live differently in the future. Along the way, the book addresses important issues in public policy, university administration, spirituality, and the notion of community and its meaning in a global world of difference. This book is essential reading for anyone concerned with the future of philosophy, and the ways in which philosophical thinking can help us live better, more fulfilling lives.


Author: Douglas Allen
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 2002
Summary:
This multidisciplinary study is the first book devoted entirely to the critical interpretation of the writings of Mircea Eliade on myth. One of the most popular and influential historians and theorists of myth, Eliade argued that all myth is religious. Douglas Allen critically interprets Eliade's theories of religion, myth, and symbolism and analyzes many of the controversial issues in Eliade's treatment of myth, including whether Eliade's approach deals adequately with the relationship between myth and history and how Eliade's anti-modern perspective makes sense of myth in modern culture. A valuable resource for scholars in religious studies, philosophy, anthropology, and history, this book enables readers not only to understand "archaic" and "traditional" religious phenomena, but also to make sense of repressed and sublimated myth dimensions in modern secular life.


Author: Robert D. Johnston
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 2003
Summary:
From grocery store to doctor's office, alternative medicine is everywhere. A recent survey found that more than two in five Americans uses some form of alternative medicine. "The Politics of Healing" brings together top scholars in the fields of American history, history of medicine, anthropology, sociology, and politics to counter the view that alternative medical therapies fell into disrepute in the decades after physicians established their institutional authority during the Progressive Era. From homeopathy to Navajo healing, this volume explores a variety of alternative therapies and political movements that have set the terms of debate over North American healing methods.


Author: Clarence Lusane
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 2002
Summary:
The Nazi era in Germany and all of its accompanying atrocities is one of the most documented periods in history. However, this documentation is incomplete in one important area: the history and experiences of people of African descent in Nazi Germany. Did Afro-Germans and other blacks suffer under Nazism? The answer to this question, to the degree it has been asked at all, remains vague even for those scholars and researchers familiar with the Nazi era and the Holocaust in particular.
Drawing on interviews with the Black survivors of Nazi concentration camps and archival research in North America, Europe, and Africa, this book documents and analyzes the meaning of Nazism's racial policies towards people of African descent, specifically those born in Germany, France, England, the United States or Africa, and the impact of that legacy on contemporary race relations in Germany, and more generally, in Europe. The book also specifically addresses the concerns of those surviving Afro-Germans who were victims of Nazism, but have not generally been included in or benefited from the compensation agreements that have been developed in recent years.


Author: Tim Cole
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 2000
Summary:
Now in paperback, "Selling the Holocaust" includes a new introduction by the author which includes an analysis of "Life is Beautiful" and Peter Novick's "Holocaust in American Life"


Author: Martin A. Lee
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1999
Summary: If you thought Nazism died with Hitler, think again. In "The Beast Reawakens", journalist Martin A. Lee traces the resurgence of fascist ideals from the prominent Nazis who escaped prosecution following World War II to the present-day incidents of right-wing violence in Europe and America. One only has to look at the current situation in the Balkans to see that fascism is alive and well. Lee begins his troubling account by reminding us of the many prominent Nazis who, after the war, built new and profitable lives for themselves fomenting political intrigue, while providing role models to a new generation of neo-Nazis all around the world. This underground Nazi culture might have remained out of sight had it not been for the fall of Communism. In the confusion following the end of the Cold War, right-wing nationalist movements sprang up all over Europe, taking root especially deep in formerly communist areas such as Croatia, Bosnia, and Romania.
According to Lee, "the Beast" doesn't restrict itself to Eastern Europe by any means; skinhead violence against immigrants is on the rise in Germany, while right-wing politicians in France, Italy, and other western European countries are increasingly finding a willing audience for their national and racial polemics. And lest American readers be lulled into a false sense of security, Lee warns that the United States is hardly immune to this kind of hateful rhetoric. He warns that many of the militia groups currently operating today share the same glorified attitude toward violence, the same irrational hatred of foreigners and ethnic minorities that mark the worst excesses of fascism in Europe.


Author: Noel Ignatiev
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1996
Summary: Ignatiev traces the tattered history of Irish and African-American relations, revealing how the Irish used labor unions, the Catholic Church and the Democratic party to succeed in American.
Focusing on how the Irish were assimilated as "whites" in America, Noel Ignatiev uncovers the roots of conflict between Irish-Americans and African-Americans and draws a powerful connection between the embracing of white supremacy and Irish "success" in 19th century American society. Ignatiev traces the tattered history of Irish and African-American relations, revealing how the Irish used labor unions, the Catholic Church and the Democratic party to help gain and secure their newly found place in the White Republic.


Author: Jill Nagle
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1997
Summary: Strippers, peepshow dancers, and porn stars trade spiked heels for footnotes while demonstrating their often overlooked ability to engage in scholarly discourse in this collection of essays focusing on the subject of feminism as practiced by those who call themselves "sex workers." Along with the first-person accounts by such underground luminaries as Nina Hartley, Tracy Quan, and Annie Sprinkle, are forays into the sex dens by a number of academics. The writing is frank, though hardly pornographic, and many of the points raised and discussed are treated with more seriousness and considerably more insight than they usually are in the mainstream press.

Author: Thomas Robbins, Susan J. Palmer
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 1997
Summary:
As we approach the Millennium, apocalyptic expectations are rising in North America and throughout the world. Beyond the symbolic aura of the millennium, this excitation is fed by currents of unsettling social and cultural change. The "millennial myth" ingrained in American culture is continually generating new movements, which draw upon the myth and also reshape and reconstruct it. "Millennium, Messiahs, and Mayhem" examines many types of apocalypticism such as economic, racialist, environmental, feminist, as well as those erupting from established churches. Many of these movements are volatile and potentially explosive.

"Millennium, Messiahs, and Mayhem" brings together scholars of apocalyptic and millennial groups to explore aspects of the contemporary apocalyptic fervor in all orginal contributions. Opening with a discussion of various theories of apocalypticism, the editors then analyze how millennialist movements have gained ground in largely secular societal circles. Section three discusses the links between apocalypticism and established churches, while the final part of the book looks at examples of violence and confrontation, from Waco to Solar Temple to the Aum Shinri Kyo subway disaster in Japan.

Contributors: James Aho, Dick Anthony, Robert Balch, Michael Barkun, John Bozeman, David Bromley, Michael Cuneo, John Dimitrovich, John Hall, Massimo Introvigne, Philip Lamy, Ronald Lawson, Martha Lee, Barbara Lynn Mahnke, Vanessa Morrison, Mark Mullins, Ansun Shupe, Susan Palmer, Thomas Robbins, Philip Schuyler and Catherine Wessinger.


Author: K. Poewe
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 2005
Summary:
Karla Poewe illuminates an important but neglected part of Nazi history: the contribution of new religions to the emergence of Nazi ideology in 1930s Germany. Looking at traditional German occultism as well as the established Church, this book takes new religions founded in the pre-Nazi and Nazi years, especially Jakob Hauer's German Faith Movement, as indicators of how German fascism distilled aspects of religious doctrine into political extremism. It is researched from original documents, including the SS personnel files held in Berlin's Bundesarchiv.


Author: L. Donskis
Publisher: Routledge
Release: 2001
Summary:
"Identity and Freedom" provides a discursive map of Lithuanian liberal nationalism by focusing on the work of three eminent Lithuanian "émigré" scholars - Vytautas Kavolis, Aleksandras Shtromas and Tomas Venclova. Presenting these critics of society - and also analysing the significant impact of such writers as George Orwell and Czeslaw Milosz on Lithuanian political and cultural dissent - the book elaborates their three models of liberal nationalism as social criticism. Incorporating material which has so far only been available in Lithuanian, Polish and Russian sources, this book will be invaluable for anyone interested in Central and East European politics, culture and society.


Author: Frank G. Goble
Publisher: Viking Pr
Release: 1970
Summary: The Essential Guide to Maslovian Psychology. Examines key concepts such as the hierarchy of needs and self-actualization, the peak experience, humanistic education, synergy, management and more. Includes the complete text of Maslow's hierarchy of needs publication, "A Theory of Human Motivation". A valuable starting point for anyone seeking a general introduction to Maslow's work. This eBook edition contains the complete 201 page text of the original 1970 hardcover edition.

Author: Charles Manson
Publisher: Grove Press
Release: 1988
Summary: Manson tells this tale from prison to former prison-mate Nuel Emmons. He begins with his childhood and explains how he was abandoned by his mother and never knew his father. He winds up in juvenile facilites at a young age and thus begins his life of incarceration. His story moves on to his release in 1967 and how he adapts to the changes in the world while he was imprisoned. It is at this time that he begins to attract young women and forms what becomes known as the "Manson Family." Finally, he concludes with his perspective of the murders that made him a household name.

What is oddly compelling is that Manson has a tendency to make a lot of sense - that is until you reread a particular paragraph and think about the inherent flaws in his logic. But at first you will think, ok, I can understand why he broke the law there.....wait a minute!! It is a fascinating look into the criminal mind and largely explains why criminals will continue to break the law and rationalize their behavior away. Ultimately, the effect he had and continues to have over others is chilling. He admits to at least some role in the murders, and through this admission shows how much control he had over the women that did his bidding. How much of this is actually directly from Manson is debatable since he has discredited Emmons since publication. However, strangely compelling, this book is a direct window into the brain of a very dangerous individual.


Author: Sheri Chinen Biesen
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press
Release: 2005
Summary:
Challenging conventional scholarship placing the origins of film noir in postwar Hollywood, Sheri Chinen Biesen finds the genre's roots firmly planted in the political, social, and material conditions of Hollywood during the war. After Pearl Harbor, America and Hollywood experienced a sharp cultural transformation that made horror, shock, and violence not only palatable but preferable. Hard times necessitated cheaper sets, fewer lights, and fresh talent; censors as well as the movie-going public showed a new tolerance for sex and violence; and female producers experienced newfound prominence in the industry.
Biesen brings prodigious archival research, accessible prose, and imaginative insights to both well-known films noir of the wartime period -- The Maltese Falcon, The Big Sleep, and Double Indemnity -- and others often overlooked or underrated -- Scarlet Street, Ministry of Fear, Phantom Lady, and Stranger on the Third Floor.


Author: Corinna Treitel
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press
Release: 2004
Summary:
Germany's painful entry into the modern age elicited many conflicting emotions. Excitement and anxiety about the "disenchantment of the world" predominated, as Germans realized that the triumph of science and reason had made the nation materially powerful while impoverishing it spiritually. Eager to enchant their world anew, many Germans in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries responded by turning to a variety of paranormal beliefs and practices -- including Theosophy, astrology, psychical research, graphology, dowsing, and spirit healing. No mere fringe phenomenon, the German occult movement had a truly national presence, encompassing hundreds of clubs, businesses, institutes, and publishers providing and consuming occult goods and services.
In A Science for the Soul, historian Corinna Treitel explores the appeal and significance of German occultism in all its varieties between the 1870s and the 1940s, locating its dynamism in the nation's struggle with modernization and the public's dissatisfaction with scientific materialism. Occultism, Treitel notes, served as a bridge between traditional religious beliefs and the values of an increasingly scientific, secular, and liberal society. Drawing on a wealth of archival materials, Treitel describes the individuals and groups who participated in the occult movement, reconstructs their organizational history, and examines the economic and social factors responsible for their success.
Building on this foundation, Treitel turns to the question of how Germans used the occult in three realms of practice: Theosophy, where occult studies were used to achieve spiritual enlightenment; the arts, where occult states of consciousness fueled the creative process of avant-garde painters, writers, and dancers; and the applied sciences, where professionals in psychology, law enforcement, engineering, and medicine employed occult techniques to solve characteristic problems of modernity. In conclusion, Treitel considers the conflicting meanings occultism held for contemporaries by focusing on the anti-spiritualist campaigns mounted by the national press, the Protestant and Catholic Churches, local and national governments, and the Nazi regime, which after years of alternating between affinity and antipathy for occultism, finally crushed the movement by 1945.
Throughout, A Science for the Soul examines German occultism in its broadest cultural setting as a key aspect of German modernism, offering new insights into how Germans met the challenge of pursuing meaningful lives in the modern age.


Author: Daniel Dubuisson
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press
Release: 2003
Summary:
In this book, anthropologist and historian of religion Daniel Dubuisson contests Mircea Eliade's theory of the existence of a universal Homo Religiosus and argues that "religion" as a discrete concept is a Western construct, an invention of nineteenth-century scholars who created it as a field of scientific study. Before that time, there was little attempt to step outside religious experience and objectify it. In fact, the difference between "secular" and "religious" as understood in the West is meaningless in many non-Western cultures.
While Dubuisson still regards the study of beliefs and belief-systems as legitimate, he argues that the word "religion" is too fraught with ideology and too Western in its associated meanings to be useful. Instead, he proposes the term "cosmographic formation," which would speak to a more universal human response to the congeries of experience we call Being, the Sacred, or God. Challenging readers to examine notions of what religion is, this book is sure to generate disagreement and controversy. The Western Construction of Religion not only provides a critical assessment of the whole history of "religion" as it is understood in the West but also offers better ways of constructing the study of this central part of human experience.


Author: Laura Otis
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press
Release: 2000
Summary:
In Membranes, Laura Otis examines how the image of the biological cell became one of the reigning metaphors of the nineteenth century. At the heart of her story is the rise of a fundamental assumption about human identity: the idea that selfhood requires boundaries showing where the individual ends and the rest of the world begins. Otis focuses on the scientific and creative writing of four physician-authors: American neurologist S. Weir Mitchell; Spanish neurobiologist Santiago Ramón y Cajal, who won the Nobel prize in 1906 for proving that neurons were intact, independent cells; British author Arthur Conan Doyle; and Austrian writer Arthur Schnitzler, a contemporary of Sigmund Freud in fin-de-siècle Vienna. Membranes also compares the scientific and political thinking of German scientists Rudolf Virchow, the founder of cellular pathology and an active liberal politician, and Robert Koch, who discovered the bacteria that cause cholera and tuberculosis and whose studies of foreign bacteria provided a scientific veneer for German colonialism. Finally, the book presents a unique reading of Thomas Mann's Death in Venice.
Otis argues that belief in impermeable personal and national borders is increasingly dangerous. Defying the traditional boundary between science and the humanities, she concludes by proposing a notion of identity based on relations and connections.


Author: Stephen G. Alter
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press
Release: 1999
Summary:
In the nineteenth century, philology -- especially comparative philology -- made impressive gains as a discipline, thus laying the foundation for the modern field of linguistics. In Darwinism and the Linguistic Image, Stephen G. Alter examines how comparative philology provided a genealogical model of language that Darwin, as well as other scientists and language scholars, used to construct rhetorical parallels with the common-descent theory of evolution.


Author: Stephen J. Whitfield
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press
Release: 1996
Summary:
"Without the Cold War, what's the point of being an American?" As if in answer to this poignant question from John Updike's Rabbit at Rest, Stephen Whitfield examines the impact of the Cold War--and its dramatic ending--on American culture in an updated version of his highly acclaimed study. In a new epilogue to this second edition, he extends his analysis from the McCarthyism of the 1950s, including its effects on the American and European intelligensia, to the civil rights movement of the 1960s and beyond.
Whitfield treats his subject matter with the eye of a historian, reminding the reader that the Cold War is now a thing of the past. His treatment underscores the importance of the Cold War to our national identity and forces the reader to ask, Where do we go from here? The question is especially crucial for the Cold War historian, Whitfield argues. His new epilogue is partly a guide for new historians to tackle the complexities of Cold War studies.


Author: Sander L. Gilman
Publisher: The Johns Hopkins University Press
Release: 1990
Summary:
"Jewish Self-Hatred has all the qualities of a master work by a seminal mind. It is a contribution of the first rank and should be regarded as one of the finest studies we are likely to see for a long time of a remarkable and sobering cultural phenomenon."--Chaim Potok, Philadelphia Inquirer.
"A broad panorama of antisemitism... Gilman's volume has the great merit of a quite unusual breadth of reference."--Times Literary Supplement.


Author: Louis A. Sass
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Release: 1995
Summary: Insanity--in clinical practice as in the popular imagination--is seen as a state of believing things that are not true and perceiving things that do not exist. Most schizophrenics, however, do not act as if they mistake their delusions for reality. In a work of uncommon insight and empathy, Louis A. Sass shatters conventional thinking about insanity by juxtaposing the narratives of delusional schizophrenics with the philosophical writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein.

Author: Morris Berman
Publisher: Cornell university press
Release: 1981
Summary: Far from being antiscientific, with definitive precision Berman demonstrates the neurotic distortions that the Cartesian paradigm has set in motion, revealing his visionary comprehension of the human experience and his insight into the entire Man, mind, body and soul.
He treats Newton with all fairness, unmoved by the applause of the sterile masses of University elite which have elevated the man to Godhood throughout the centuries. As the psalmist says, "What is Man but a breath that passes?...Where were you when I laid the foundations of the deep?"
Any world veiw that forgets this human composition must necessarily lead to severe disruption of the human family. Science, divorced from reason, wisdom tradition, and high theology, and the objective methods upon which it was founded, will lead to an impoverishing rationalism that starves the soul. It will become a sort of false magic entrancing men with debasing theories, desecting Man into a mere biologic product. Hence the rise of mass genocides in the 20th century.
This was an excellent read which deeply effected the course of my studies for years.


Author: Robert Edward Norton
Publisher: Cornell university press
Release: 2002
Summary: I wish to stress with some urgency that in my view this recently issued monograph on Germany's greatest poet, Stefan George, who was likewise one of modern Europe's most enigmatic and disturbing political presences, constitutes an achievement of incomparable significance in the historiography of cultural modernism. Experto crede: I have been occupied in studying these individuals for thirty years or more, and I can assure students that Robert Edward Norton has shed more light than admirers of Stefan George would have thought possible upon a dazzlingly talented, albeit indubitably eccentric,literary cenacle at whose center stood the masterful and charismatic visionary who was its spiritus rector.
Although George began his literary career as something of a minor Teutonic satellite on the far fringes of the French Symbolist movement (we learn, for instance, that the poet became quite close, both personally and artistically, to several of the Symbolist School's leading lights, viz., Paul Verlaine and Stephane Mallarme to mention just two of the more prominent figures) the predominant emphasis in Robert E. Norton's monograph rests upon the author's entertaining presentation of a wide range of hitherto obscure details involving the poet's later career, when his personal pretensions began to outweigh his literary career--over which George assiduously endeavored to cast a shroud of mystery and ambiguity--as well as unlocking for us a treasure trove of hitherto obscure biographical facts and anecdotes about the disciples and associates who drifted into the orbit of George-Kreis at one time or another. These anecdotes cover the waterfront, from uproarious and barely believable brawls that erupt out of the blue between alpha-intellects who are not what one would describe as pugilists, to grotesque tales of oddballs and geniuses who prefer to gussy themselves up in amazing couture in order to be wearing chic and appropriate threads when sallying out to attend the legendary and elaborate masqued balls that were almost a matter of routine in Schwabing-Muenchen. That custom, we learn, dictates that these people are more often than not attired in Roman-styled togas or, when feeling somewhat more daring, decked out in some gaudy purple-dyed gown that has been designed to garb a middle-aged intellectual who is impersonating the Magna Mater!
We learn also that these bright young things also hold somewhat outre "language orgies" in the course of which one of the oddest of the odd, viz., Alfred Schuler, launches himself into a catatonic state and then proceeds to time-travel back to ancient Rome (to visit his idol, of course, the Roman Emperor Nero!).
On the darker side of these affairs, the narrative presents more ominous anticipations and adumbrations of ominous types of cultic behaviors and ritual observances many of which would one day come to exert a profound and troubling influence on a less purely literary gathering of activists, viz., Hitler's National Socialists, whose adherents were to inherit so many elements of George's uniquely--even oppresively--authoritarian leadership style, along with the [Schuler-inspired]adoption during the fin de siecle period of the swastika as a sort of occult sigil of mystical might, one that came to adorn the title page of the Circle's official literary journal, the Blaetter fuer die Kunst.
We're also given numerous details about the poet's itinerary as he wandered from one associate's flat to another's (he was definitely what one might call a "professional house-guest"), along with fresh discoveries about the incredible group of renowned thinkers and creative writers (among whom the most talented were surely philosopher Ludwig Klages, archaeologist Alfred Schuler, poet Hugo von Hoffmansthal, and Shakespearean scholar Friedrich Gundolf), all of whom became adherents to the famous "Circles" that were so idiosyncratic a feature of cultural life in Schwabing-Munich at the dawn of the 20th century.
In closing, I repeat that I highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in German culture, in the nascent proto-National Socialist scene in early 20th century Bavaria, or simply in the spectacle of some of the weirdest intellectuals ever to have come down the pike.


Author: Douglas Groothuis
Publisher: Baker Pub Group
Release: 1997
Summary: In our desire for having more information available to us immediately, we have jumped on the Internet bandwagon without taking time to evaluate it. Groothuis, a professor of philosophy, offers an excellent and insightful look at the world of cyberspace. Drawing from the philosophy of Pascal, the Bible, and other material, he examines the nature of leisure and its implications related to the Internet and associated technologies.
He is critical of the hypertext concept and argues that the ability to instantly jump from document to document is not necessarily a good thing. We end up seeing so much information in so many different contexts that it no longer is a learning process, but simply an exercise in clicking and skimming.
Among the specific issues Groothuis examines include the impact of "cybersex"; video games; chat rooms; e-mail; online distance education; and the nature of leisure. Unlike many Internet books which are obsolete before they even go to print, this book will leave you thinking about technology and how you use the Internet.
Groothuis is far from being anti-technology. After all, he admits to writing his book on computer and he maintains his own web site. His emphasis is more on the philosophical implications of technology and how we can think critically about it. He's concerned that online activities (MUDs, for example) and personas (such as Avatars) are getting in the way of real life. As a result, he argues, we are losing a sense of community and face to face interaction. When online, people tend to be bolder - they send "flame" e-mail and say things they would never say to someone in person. They can also pretend to be someone they are not. Groothuis does not condemn leisure activities, but challenges the reader to return to reality.
He also questions the perpetual increase and advances in personal computer technology and how they can negatively affect people. A desire to have the latest technological toy or upgrade to whatever piece of hardware is the latest rage, is not healthy, he argues.
If you're open to thoughtful criticism and evaluation of the Internet, this is a great book to read. If anything, it will make you look at the Internet and technology through philosophical eyes.


Author: A. K. M. Adam
Publisher: Augsburg Fortress Publishers
Release: 1995
Summary: Let me say up front that I'm a big fan of the author's Weblog. He's first on my blogroll by the accident of alphabetism, but he's also at the top of my list of must-read bloggers. So don't expect this book review to be impartial or anything.

AKMA, aka A.K.M. Adam, is Associate Professor of New Testament at Seabury-Western Theological Seminary. He has too many letters after his name, writes prolifically, blogs beautifully and is a cofounder of the aptly named "Disseminary."
He's also a postmodern kind of guy--but please don't hold that against him.
In the institutional-evangelical-churchy world, "postmodern" isn't exactly a term of endearment. Depending upon one's level of conservatism and awareness, "postmodern" could mean anything from the utter decline of Western civilization to one of the most exciting times for Christians to be alive. I lean to the latter interpretation, and so does AKMA.
The truth is, however, that when you hear the word "postmodern" bandied about in church circles, it's likely no one really knows what they mean. Even postmodern scholars don't know exactly what it means--if they'll even dignify the use of the word. But there are some broad movements that fall into the generally-accepted "postmodern" camp--and herein begins the book review.
AKMA did the world a tremendous favor when he wrote "What is Postmodern Biblical Criticism?" Note that I said "the world," not just "Christians." For despite its title, WPBC is an astoundingly clear introduction to postmodern thought in general.
Writing with his characteristic wit and thoughtfulness, AKMA explores and explains such initially terrifying concepts as antifoundationalism, deconstruction and bricolage. These topics promise heavy going, so don't expect this to be "The Reader's Digest Guide to Postmodernism." AKMA's writing is beautifully challenging. It demands your attention as it must, yet often at the end of a lengthy sentence or paragraph you find yourself smiling at how well everything came together. (Watch carefully for wordplay!) And when you pay attention, you discover that, lo and behold, you are beginning to understand what postmodernism is all about.
What about the "Biblical" part of the title? Yes, it's there, woven neatly into the text and providing examples of key points. But this isn't a Bible study or "purpose-driven" guide to making Scripture relevant to post-Christian society. Make no mistake.
I experienced WPBC as something like a good tramp through Ireland in the company of AKMA--one of those journeys of good company, good talk and good ale at the end of the day that you'll long remember. I was stretched, refreshed and improved. There's not much more you can ask for from a book.


Author: Bryan S. Rennie
Publisher: State University of New York Press
Release: 2000
Summary: Assesses Mircea Eliade's contribution to the contemporary understanding of religion and the academic study of religion.
Changing Religious Worlds measures the nature and significance of Mircea Eliade's contribution to the understanding and academic study of religion in North America today. It includes the perspectives of the continent's leading experts on Eliade and his thought, both critical and supportive. It also includes previously unpublished fiction and journal entries from Eliade himself. The book ponders whether it is time to leave Eliade behind or whether we can yet learn from either his insights or his errors, and whether the changing world has left Eliade behind or whether it is finally catching up with him. Particular consideration is given to whether Eliade makes any lasting contribution to our ability to deal with the changing face of religion and the ability to "change over" into the religious world of the other and to see through the eyes of the other.


Author: Robert S. Ellwood
Publisher: State University of New York Press
Release: 1999
Summary: The Politics of Myth examines the political views implicit in the mythological theories of three of the most widely read popularizers of myth in the twentieth century, C. G. Jung, Mircea Eliade, and Joseph Campbell. All three had intellectual roots in the anti-modern pessimism and romanticism that also helped give rise to European fascism, and all three have been accused of fascist and anti-Semitic sentiments. At the same time, they themselves tended toward individualistic views of the power of myth, believing that the world of ancient myth contained resources that could be of immense help to people baffled by the ambiguities and superficiality of modern life.
Robert Ellwood details the life and thought of each mythologist and the intellectual and spiritual worlds within which they worked. He reviews the damaging charges that have been made about their politics, taking them seriously while endeavoring to put them in the context of the individual's entire career and lifetime contribution. Above all, he seeks to extract from their published work the view of the political world that seems most congruent with it.


Author: Jenny Wade
Publisher: State University of New York Press
Release: 1996
Summary: An original theory of the development of consciousness that brings together research from neurology, new-paradigm studies, psychology, and mysticism.

Author: K. Paul Johnson
Publisher: State University of New York Press
Release: 1994
Summary: _The Masters Revealed: Madame Blavatsky and the Myth of the Great White Lodge_ by K. Paul Johnson is a book which attempts to shed some light on the historical personages behind Madame Blavatsky's hidden masters. Madame Blavatsky's career is shrouded in mystery and the movement of Theosophy which grew from that career remains engimatic for many spiritual seekers as well as cultural historians. Blavatsky, who was investigated by the Society for Psychical Research, claimed at various times to be receiving messages from hidden masters, prime among these were individuals known as Morya and Koot Hoomi. While the society found her claims to be fraudulent, others involved in the Theosophical movement maintained their legitimacy to varying degrees. This book offers evidence that will meet the challenge of the skeptic as well as the true believer alike. The author notes how political intrigue came to play a central role in Blavatsky's hidden messengers. The book covers various individuals who the author regards to be "adepts" and "mahatmas", individuals who Blavatsky knew and who she incorporated into her myth of the hidden masters. Among the adepts are Prince Pavel Dolgorukii, Prince Aleksandr Golitsyn, Albert Rawson, Paolos Metamon, Agardi Metrovitch, Giuseppe Mazzini, Louis Maximilien Bimstein, Jamal ad-Din "al-Afghani", James Sanua, Lydia Pashkov, Ooton Liatto, Marie Countess of Caithness, Sir Richard Burton, Abdelkader, Raphael Borg, James Peebles, Charles Sotheran, and Mikhail Katkov. Among the mahatmas are Swami Dayananda Sarasvati, Shyamaji Krishnavarma, Maharaja Ranbir Singh of Kashmir, Thakar Singh Sandhanwalia, Maharaja Holkar of Indore, Bhai Gurmukh Singh, Baba Khem Singh Bedi, Surendranath Banerjea, Dayal Singh Majithia, Sumangala Unnanse, Sarat Chandra Das, Ugyen Gyatso, Sengchen Tulku, and Swami Sankaracharya of Mysore. Many of these individuals had special political connections or were linked to the religious movement of Sikhism. This book shows how all were involved to some extent in the life of Madame Blavatsky and how she incorporated these individuals into her hidden master myth. While this book is sure to be rejected by outright skeptics who deny any historical reality to the masters and by adherents to Theosophy who maintain allegiance to Blavatsky's teachings, it is sure to provide interesting material for those who come to this subject from a third viewpoint.

Author: F. X. Charet
Publisher: State University of New York Press
Release: 1993
Summary:

Author: J.D.F. Jones
Publisher: Carroll & Graf Publishers
Release: 2002
Summary: The celebrated Laurens van der Post made a life of lies. Those who know him as the advisor of Prince Charles and Margaret Thatcher, author of twenty-three popular, award-winning books, (several of which were made into films) and a speaker for the cause of African peoples will be startled by the revelations in this fascinating biography of a consummate fabricator. Among the romantic highlights in van der Post's version of his life were an Afrikaner childhood that featured a Bushman nursemaid, decorated military service, a brutal stretch as a POW in the Pacific, his devoted friendship with Carl Jung, and his sympathetic chronicles of the Kalahari Bushmen. Peeling away van der Post's stories, J. D. F. Jones's biography shows that most of his tales were tall—designed to dazzle an all-too-gullible world. In reality, van der Post had no Bushman nanny; his World War II military service, for which he abandoned his wife and children, was not particularly distinguished; and his relationship with Jung was tenuous at most. He also advised Britain's elite, although his credentials were only a tissue of invention that he kept aloft until his death at age ninety in 1996. While disclosing van der Post's many fictions, Jones never loses sight of his very real charisma and the widespread devotion he inspired. At once probing and unsparing, Teller of Many Tales is also a model of biographic balance and illumination. “...a fantasist, a liar, a serial adulterer... It was to this man that Lady Thatcher turned for advice... Devastating...”—Sunday Telegraph

Author: Edward Gorman
Publisher: Carroll & Graf Publishers
Release: 2001
Summary: Six masters of pulp fiction at its most powerful and suspenseful best -- John MacDonald, James M. Cain, Donald Westlake, Lawrence Block, Mickey Spillane, and Harrington Whittington -- distinguish this new anthology compiled by the award-winning editors of its two popular predecessors, American Pulp and Pure Pulp. Like them, Pulp Masters culls its tales -- in this case, six classic novelettes and one complete novel -- from the golden age of magazine fiction in the first half of the twentieth century. The writers included in this volume in time emerged as giants in the field of crime fiction, and the stories in this volume demonstrate why. Their voices fresh, their talents raw and original, with novelettes like "Ordo," "Stag Party Kill," "The Embezzler," and "Everybody's Watching Me," Westlake, Block, Cain, and Spillane both heralded and shaped the crime story as we know it today. So did "the King of the Paperback Original" -- Harrington Whittington -- represented here by the novel based on his pulp short story "So Dead, My Love."

Author: Colin Wilson, Damon Wilson
Publisher: Carroll & Graf Publishers
Release: 2000
Summary: An expert examination of the most perplexing and still unexplained mysteries in more than two thousand years of human history. From Atlantis, the Bermuda Triangle, and Bigfoot to Tunguska, vampires, and zombies, the most fascinating subjects previously featured in Colin Wilson's popular Unsolved Mysteries Past and Present Encyclopedia of Unsolved Mysteries, and The Unexplained now appear along with new, equally mystifying material in one tremendous revised and updated volume. In it, Wilson shares his expert research and investigation into seventy-five of the world's most enduring mysteries, among them crop circles and crystal skulls, monsters and meteors, pyramids and poltergeists, the Hope Diamond and the Holy Shroud of Turin.

Author: Robert Lesser
Publisher: Book Sales
Release: 2003
Summary: Several famous fantasy and science fiction authors had their beginning in the pulp magazines of the 1930s and 1940s, including Robert E. Howard, H.P. Lovecraft, Fritz Leiber, Isaac Asimov, and Ray Bradbury (not to mention Dashiell Hammett and Tennessee Williams). There were also crime fighters so popular they had their own magazines, such as the still-popular Doc Savage and the Shadow. But besides the writers and the series heroes, there was yet another element for which the lurid pulp magazines (called "pulp" in reference to the cheap grade of paper they were printed on by the millions) are fondly remembered to this day: the cover art. Robert Lesser offers a fascinating history from the perspective of the commercial artists who produced this often less-than-respectable work, thereby bringing the acclaim that these now mostly forgotten artists richly deserve. The author also includes 18 essays about various aspects of the long extinct industry, from such legendary SF scholars as Forrest J. Ackerman and Sam Moskowitz. Needless to say, the book is also stuffed with some amazing artwork. "Pulp Art" is a perfect introduction to a once nearly lost aspect of pop culture, which just now is being properly appreciated. "--Stanley Wiater"

Author:
Publisher: Universal Studios
Release:
Summary: Although it wasn't a box-office success when originally released in 1958, "Vertigo" has since taken its deserved place as Alfred Hitchcock's greatest, most spellbinding, most deeply personal achievement. In fact, it consistently ranks among the top 10 movies ever made in the once-a-decade "Sight & Sound" international critics poll, placing at number 4 in the most recent survey. (Universal Pictures' spectacularly gorgeous 1996 restoration and rerelease of this 1958 Paramount production was a tremendous success with the public, too.) James Stewart plays a retired police detective who is hired by an old friend to follow his wife (a superb Kim Novak, in what becomes a double role), whom he suspects of being possessed by the spirit of a dead madwoman. The detective and the disturbed woman fall ("fall" is indeed the operative word) in love and...well, to give away any more of the story would be criminal. Shot around San Francisco (the Golden Gate Bridge and the Palace of the Legion of Honor are significant locations) and elsewhere in Northern California (the redwoods, Mission San Juan Batista) in rapturous Technicolor, "Vertigo" is as lovely as it is haunting. "--Jim Emerson"

Author:
Publisher: New Line Home Video
Release:
Summary: Previously filmed in 1933 (as "Island of Lost Souls") and 1977, the classic H.G. Wells story was filmed again for this graphic 1996 version. The film was roasted by critics, but it's an utterly fascinating failure, largely due to the performances of David Thewlis, Val Kilmer, and especially Marlon Brando in the title role as a mad (and in this case outrageously bizarre) scientist whose experiments in crossbreeding humans with animals have gone terribly awry. Thewlis plays the wayward scholar who is rescued at sea by Kilmer and brought to Moreau's island to discover the doctor's unnatural "children." Fairuza Balk plays Moreau's half-cat daughter, but it's Brando and Kilmer (in one scene doing a killer Brando impersonation) who steal the show, along with the astounding makeup effects created by Stan Winston. A guilty pleasure by any measure, this movie has definite cult-favorite potential, and in addition to offering a "director's cut" with previously unseen footage, the DVD includes audio commentary by director John Frankenheimer, who replaced the original director on short notice and completed this film under highly stressful conditions. "--Jeff Shannon"

Author: Dalai Lama
Publisher: Morgan Road Books
Release: 2006
Summary: Galileo, Copernicus, Newton, Niels Bohr, Einstein. Their insights shook our perception of who we are and where we stand in the world, and in their wake have left an uneasy coexistence: science vs. religion, faith vs. empirical inquiry. Which is the keeper of truth? Which is the true path to understanding reality?

After forty years of study with some of the greatest scientific minds, as well as a lifetime of meditative, spiritual, and philosophic study, the Dalai Lama presents a brilliant analysis of why all avenues of inquiry—scientific as well as spiritual—must be pursued in order to arrive at a complete picture of the truth. Through an examination of Darwinism and karma, quantum mechanics and philosophical insight into the nature of reality, neurobiology and the study of consciousness, the Dalai Lama draws significant parallels between contemplative and scientific examinations of reality.

This breathtakingly personal examination is a tribute to the Dalai Lama’s teachers—both of science and spirituality. The legacy of this book is a vision of the world in which our different approaches to understanding ourselves, our universe, and one another can be brought together in the service of humanity.


Author: Sakyong Mipham
Publisher: Morgan Road Books
Release: 2005
Summary:
For the first time ever, revered spiritual leader Sakyong Mipham brings the lessons of the ancient Shambhala warriors and rulers to the Western world and shows us how to live our lives with confidence.


"Most of us are living in a haze—sometimes helping others, sometimes helping ourselves, sometimes happy, sometimes sad. We don’t feel in control of our own lives. The ancient teachings of Shambhala rulership show us that we all have the ability to rule our own world and live with confidence. To do this, we need to use our daily lives to be strong, as opposed to aggressive, and to act with wisdom and compassion. This may sound difficult, but when we begin to mix this ancient wisdom of rulership into our everyday life, we have both spiritual and worldly success. We don’t need to abandon our life and become an ascetic or a monk in order to gain confidence and achieve this success. We can live in the world as a ruler no matter what we are doing.
—from "Ruling Your World" "
You’re stuck in the airport security line, late for a flight. The line isn’t moving. You’re angry at the security personnel for taking so long, you’re irritated at the other passengers for having so much stuff, you’re mad at your boss for sending you on this trip in the first place. By the time you get to your gate you’re angry, deflated, and exhausted. Then someone cuts in front of you in the line to board and you snap. “There’s a line, you know!” Is that really you, standing in an airport, yelling at a stranger, emotions raging?

It happens to most of us more than we’d like to admit. In an instant, our lives seem out of control and overwhelming. It’s always something, isn’t it? But what if you could approach every part of your life—from the smallest decisions to life’s biggest setbacks—with total confidence, clarity, and control?

According to Sakyong Mipham, we all have that power. The secret is simple: If you just stop thinking about yourself all the time, happiness and confidence will come naturally. It sounds absurd and, what’s more, impossible. But in" Ruling Your World", Sakyong Mipham shares ancient secrets on how to take control of our lives and be successful while cultivating compassion for others and confidence in our own intelligence and goodness. The key to this well-being lies in the ancient strategies of the warrior kings and queens of Shambhala.

The kingdom of Shambhala was an enlightened kingdom of benevolent kings and queens and fiercely trained warriors. No one knows for sure whether this kingdom was real or mythical, but there are ancient guidebooks to this land and practical instructions for creating a Shambhala in your own world, bringing peace, purpose, and perspective into your life and environment.

Sakyong Mipham, the descendant of a warrior king, has inherited these teachings and gives us the lessons and myths of the great rulers and warriors of Shambhala. He makes these teachings relevant to our twenty-first-century lives in a fresh and witty voice and helps us all to realize our potential for power and control in a seemingly uncontrollable world.


Author: Daniel Pinchbeck
Publisher: Broadway
Release: 2003
Summary: "A dazzling work of personal travelogue and cultural criticism that ranges from the primitive to the postmodern in a quest for the promise and meaning of the psychedelic experience.

"While psychedelics of all sorts are demonized in America today, the visionary compounds found in plants are the spiritual sacraments of tribal cultures around the world. From the iboga of the Bwiti in Gabon, to the Mazatecs of Mexico, these plants are sacred because they awaken the mind to other levels of awareness--to a holographic vision of the universe.

"Breaking Open the Head" is a passionate, multilayered, and sometimes rashly personal inquiry into this deep division. On one level, Daniel Pinchbeck tells the story of the encounters between the modern consciousness of the West and these sacramental substances, including such thinkers as Allen Ginsberg, Antonin Artaud, Walter Benjamin, and Terence McKenna, and a new underground of present-day ethnobotanists, chemists, psychonauts, and philosophers. It is also a scrupulous recording of the author's wide-ranging investigation with these outlaw compounds, including a thirty-hour tribal initiation in West Africa; an all-night encounter with the master shamans of the South American rain forest; and a report from a psychedelic utopia in the Black Rock Desert that is the Burning Man Festival.

"Breaking Open the Head" is brave participatory journalism at its best, a vivid account of psychic and intellectual experiences that opened doors in the wall of Western rationalism and completed Daniel Pinchbeck's personal transformation from a jaded Manhattan journalist to shamanic initiate and grateful citizen of the cosmos.


"From the Hardcover edition."


Author: Bobbi Parish
Publisher: Broadway
Release: 1999
Summary: Having survived a dramatic betrayal and ensuing suicide attempt, author Bobbi Parrish knows how important it is to have a spiritual foundation. When she began her path toward emotional recovery, she naturally found herself hungry for spiritual guidance. But once she became a seeker, she also found herself trying to shape her spiritual beliefs to match the scriptures of a particular religion. Unfortunately, not one text or scripture seemed to address the highly personal form of spirituality that dwelled in her heart and soul. So instead, Parish took a creative leap, deciding to reverse the process--writing and gathering text that reflected her unique beliefs. Before long she created her "Personal Sacred Text."
Since contemporary spirituality seems to echo this longing to follow individual paths, many readers may find themselves in the same predicament as Parish once did. This guidebook is highly instructional, showing readers how they can assemble and study their own sacred text. Fear not: This is not a weighty, academic exercise in theology. Readers don't even have to consider themselves researchers, writers, or poets. In fact, Parish shows readers that everyone possesses the necessary tools. Chapters include, "What You Need Before You Start" (such as a commitment to integrity, a few writing supplies, etc.), "Making Selections From Existing Material" (with an extensive list of resources), and "Writing Your Own Scripture" (with specific writing exercises). "--Gail Hudson"


Author: Ken Wilber
Publisher: Broadway
Release: 1999
Summary: There is arguably no more critical and pressing topic than the relation of science and religion in the modern world. Science has given us the methods for discovering truth, while religion remains the single greatest force for generating meaning. Yet the two are seen as mutually exclusive, with wrenching consequences for humanity. In The Marriage of Sense and Soul, one of today's most important philosophers brilliantly articulates how we might begin to think about science and religion in ways that allow for their reconciliation and union, on terms that will be acceptable to both camps.
        Ken Wilber is widely acclaimed as the foremost thinker in integrating Western psychology and the Eastern spiritual traditions. His many books have reached across disciplines and synthesized the teachings of religion, psychology, physics, mysticism, sociology, and anthropology, earning him a devoted international following. The Marriage of Sense and Soul is his most accessible work yet, aimed at guiding a general audience to the mutual accord between the spiritual, subjective world of ancient wisdom and the objective, empirical world of modern knowledge.
        Wilber clearly and succinctly explores the schism between science and religion, and the impact of this "philosophical Cold War" on the fate of humanity. He systematically reviews previous attempts at integration, explaining why romantic, idealistic, and postmodern theories failed. And he demonstrates how science is compatible with certain deep features common to all of the world's major religious traditions. In pointing the way to a union between truth and meaning, Ken Wilber has created an elegant and accessible book that is breathtaking in its scope.


Author: Kirk J. Schneider
Publisher: Sage Publications, Inc
Release: 2002
Summary: "The Handbook of Humanistic Psychology presents a historic overview, theory, methodology, applications to practice and to broader settings, and an epilogue for the new millennium...The Handbook of Humanistic Psychology is an academic text excellently suited for collegiate education and research...The Handbook of Humanistic Psychology will be the inspiration and reference source for the next generation of humanists in all fields."

                                                                                                                                               - Lynn Seiser, Ph.D., THE THERAPIST

"This volume represents an essential milestone and defining moment for humanistic psychology…. [It] belongs on the shelf of everyone who identifies with the humanistic movement and can serve as an excellent resource for those who would like to offer their students more than the perfunctory three paragraphs designated to humanistic psychology found in most introductory psychology books" -Donadrian Rice, CONTEMPORARY PSYCHOLOGY"
 "Psychologists already partial to humanistic perspectives will take great pleasure in reading this book, and those seeking to expand their understanding of psychological humanism will find themselves much informed, perhaps even inspired, by it."" - Irving B. Weiner, PSYCHOTHERAPY RESEARCH"
 "A cornucopia of valuable historical, theoretical, and practical information for the Humanistic Psychologist.""  " — "Irvin Yalom, "Emeritus Professor of Psychiatry, Stanford University
 "The editors represent both the founding generation and contemporary leadership and the contributors they have enlisted include most of the active voices in the humanistic movement. I know of no better source for either insiders or outsiders to grasp what humanistic psychology is about, and what either insiders or outsiders should do about it."   — "M. Brewster Smith, "University of California at Santa Cruz
 "As a humanist it offered me a breadth I had not known existed, as a researcher it offered me an excellent statement of in depth research procedures to get closer to human experience, as a practitioner it offered me inspiration. For all those who work with and explore human experience, you can not afford to miss the voice of the third force so excellently conveyed in this comprehensive coverage of its unique view of human possibility and how to harness it."   — "Leslie S. Greenberg, "York University"
Inspired by James F. T. Bugental’s classic, "Challenges of Humanistic Psychology" (1967), The Handbook of Humanistic Psychology represents the latest scholarship in the resurgent field of humanistic psychology and psychotherapy. Set against trends toward psychological standardization and medicalization, the handbook provides a rich tapestry of reflection by the leading person-centered scholars of our time. Their range in topics is far-reaching—from the historical, theoretical, and methodological, to the spiritual, psychotherapeutic, and multicultural. Psychology is poised for a renaissance, and this handbook will play a critical role in that transformation. As increasing numbers of students and professionals rebel against mechanizing trends, they are looking for the fuller, deeper, and more personal psychological orientation that this handbook promotes.
 
 


Author: Ed Hoffman
Publisher: Sage Publications, Inc
Release: 1996
Summary: "Future Visions is an important book. Its contents will assure the continued influence of Abraham Maslow, whose image of the human psyche was a welcome antidote to the dismal picture portrayed by many of the early psychoanalysts. From Maslow's perspective, humankind is endowed with a 'will to health' and a potential for 'self-actualization'--the very qualities that will assure the survival of human beings into the next century and beyond." --Stanley Krippner, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, Saybrook Institute, San Francisco "Over a quarter century since his untimely death, it seems clear that Abraham Maslow was a pioneer in a new direction of psychology (humanistic and transpersonal), even as mainstream psychology would continue to move in the scientism direction for decades to come. In his key book Toward a Psychology of Being (1962), Maslow had a central chapter, 'On the Need to Know and the Fear of Knowing,' in which he observed that our strongest resistance is not to knowing the most despicable in ourselves but to knowing the highest, 'the most godlike.' He saw this characteristic as one of the chief obstacles to the coming revolution in our logos of the psyche, as well as in leadership and in organization and social change. This book, Future Visions, is especially inspirational in its demonstration that Maslow saw clearly both the revolutionary force that has continued to grow over the past several decades, and the reasons to anticipate that it would meet with opposition. It is far more apparent now than it was at the time of his death what a remarkable leader Maslow was. This book is extremely helpful in bringing together his thoughts, which, because of his early death, he never assembled into his own summum opus." --Willis Harman, President, Institute of Noetic Sciences One of the founders of humanistic psychology, Abraham Maslow spent a lifetime developing theories that shaped not only psychology but counseling, education, social work, theology, marketing, and management as well. Indicative of his influence, Maslow's ideas on human behavior and motivation have become a part of public consciousness. At the time of his death 25 years ago, he left a vast collection of articles, essays, and letters intended for publication. Now, noted Maslow biographer and award-winning author Edward Hoffman has compiled the most compelling of these writings into one volume. In an array of letters, working papers, lectures, and journal entries, Maslow shares his thoughts on topics that range from self-actualization and well-being to American politics and organizational management. Hoffman provides helpful introductions to Maslow's life and work, as well as to each writing, and a handy glossary of terms used by Maslow. Both scholars and students of personality, counseling, and humanistic psychology--as well as management, education, and social work--will discover new insights into Abraham Maslow's influential work through this important book.

Author: Matthew W. Ragas, Bj Bueno
Publisher: Crown Business
Release: 2002
Summary: Like religious cults that can attract thousands of devoted disciples, is it possible for company brands to build legions of loyal followers? In a marketer's dream come true, can certain products—with the right combination of positioning and branding—take on magnetic characteristics and galvanize die-hard customers who become walking, talking viral marketers? Can your company harness the power of cult branding without blowing a fortune on advertising?
According to authors Matthew W. Ragas and Bolivar J. Bueno the answer is yes. In fact, you need not look much farther than a Harley-Davidson rally, a Star Trek convention, or a Jimmy Buffett concert to see the cult branding phenomenon at work: thousands of passionate, faithful fans spreading the good word and spending lots of money. Not all brands have the dash of edginess, the devoted fan base, or the niche positioning to be cult brands. But those that do tend to share similar characteristics that make them successful, what the authors call the Seven Golden Rules of Cult Branding. Through meticulous research and scores of interviews Ragas and Bueno have uncovered the remarkable and oft-untold stories behind nine very successful cult brands:
·Star Trek
·Harley-Davidson
·Oprah Winfrey
·World Wrestling Entertainment (formerly WWF)
·Apple
·Volkswagen Beetle
·Jimmy Buffett
·Vans Shoes
·Linux
These nine brands follow the Seven Golden Rules and have millions of fans and billions of dollars in revenue to show for it. Now you can learn first hand what these special brands did to set themselves apart and how to apply the Seven Golden Rules to your own marketing strategies.
Written for advertisers, marketers, sales executives, and business owners who want to thrive in an increasingly competitive marketplace, "The Power of Cult Branding" is the ultimate guide to creating a loyal core of repeat customers and winning the positioning battle.


Author: Zygmunt Bauman
Publisher: Polity Press
Release: 2005
Summary: 'Liquid life' is the kind of life commonly lived in our contemporary, liquid-modern society. Liquid life cannot stay on course, as liquid-modern society cannot keep its shape for long. Liquid life is a precarious life, lived under conditions of constant uncertainty.The most acute and stubborn worries that haunt this liquid life are the fears of being caught napping, of failing to catch up with fast moving events, of overlooking the 'use by' dates and being saddled with worthless possessions, of missing the moment calling for a change of tack and being left behind. Liquid life is also shot through by a contradiction: it ought to be a (possibly unending) series of new beginnings, yet precisely for that reason it is full of worries about swift and painless endings, without which new beginnings would be unthinkable. Among the arts of liquid-modern living and the skills needed to practice them, getting rid of things takes precedence over their acquisition.This and other challenges of life in a liquid-modern society are traced and unravelled in the successive chapters of this new book by one of the most brilliant and original social thinkers of our time.

Author: Jurgen Habermas
Publisher: Polity Press
Release: 2003
Summary: Recent developments in biotechnology and genetic research are raising complex ethical questions concerning the legitimate scope and limits of genetic intervention. As we begin to contemplate the possibility of intervening in the human genome to prevent diseases, we cannot help but feel that the human species might soon be able to take its biological evolution in its own hands. 'Playing God' is the metaphor commonly used for this self-transformation of the species, which, it seems, might soon be within our grasp.In this important new book, Jürgen Habermas - the most influential philosopher and social thinker in Germany today - takes up the question of genetic engineering and its ethical implications and subjects it to careful philosophical scrutiny. His analysis is guided by the view that genetic manipulation is bound up with the identity and self-understanding of the species. We cannot rule out the possibility that knowledge of one's own hereditary factors may prove to be restrictive for the choice of an individual's way of life and may undermine the symmetrical relations between free and equal human beings.In the concluding chapter - which was delivered as a lecture on receiving the Peace Prize of the German Book Trade for 2001 - Habermas broadens the discussion to examine the tension between science and religion in the modern world, a tension which exploded, with such tragic violence, on September 11th.

Author: Zygmunt Bauman
Publisher: Polity Press
Release: 2002
Summary: Society is under siege - under attack on two fronts: from the global frontier-land where old structures and rules do not hold and new ones are slow to take shape, and from the fluid, undefined domain of life politics. The space between these two fronts, until recently ruled by the sovereign nation-state and identified by social scientists as 'society' is ever more difficult to conceive of as a self-enclosed entity. And this confronts the established wisdom of the social sciences with a new challenge: sovereignty and power are becoming separated from the politics of the territorial nation-state but are not becoming institutionalized in a new space. What are the consequences of this profound transformation of social life? What kind of world will it create for the twenty-first century?This remarkable book - by one of the most original social thinkers writing today - attempts to trace this transformation and to assess its consequences for the life conditions of ordinary individuals. The first part of the book is devoted to the new global arena in which, thanks to the powerful forces of globalization, there is no 'outside', no secluded place to which one can retreat and hide away, and where the territorial wars of the past have given way to a new breed of 'reconnaissance wars'. The second part deals with settings in which life politics has taken hold and flourished. Bauman argues that the great challenge facing us today is whether we can find new ways to reforge the human diversity that is our fate into the vocation of human solidarity.

Author: Zygmunt Bauman
Publisher: Polity Press
Release: 2003
Summary: This book is about the central figure of our contemporary, 'liquid modern' times - the man or woman with no bonds, and particularly with none of the fixed or durable bonds that would allow the effort of self-definition and self-assertion to come to a rest. Having no permanent bonds, the denizen of our liquid modern society must tie whatever bonds they can to engage with others, using their own wits, skill and dedication. But none of these bonds are guaranteed to last. Moreover, they must be tied loosely so that they can be untied again, quickly and as effortlessly as possible, when circumstances change - as they surely will in our liquid modern society, over and over again.The uncanny frailty of human bonds, the feeling of insecurity that frailty inspires, and the conflicting desires to tighten the bonds yet keep them loose, are the principal themes of this important new book by Zygmunt Bauman, one of the most original and influential social thinkers of our time. It will be of great interest to students and scholars in sociology and in the social sciences and humanities generally, and it will appeal to anyone interested in the changing nature of human relationships.

Author: Zygmunt Bauman
Publisher: Polity Press
Release: 2000
Summary: In this new book, Bauman examines how we have moved away from a 'heavy' and 'solid', hardware-focused modernity to a 'light' and 'liquid', software-based modernity. This passage, he argues, has brought profound change to all aspects of the human condition. The new remoteness and un-reachability of global systemic structure coupled with the unstructured and under-defined, fluid state of the immediate setting of life-politics and human togetherness, call for the rethinking of the concepts and cognitive frames used to narrate human individual experience and their joint history.This book is dedicated to this task. Bauman selects five of the basic concepts which have served to make sense of shared human life - emancipation, individuality, time/space, work and community - and traces their successive incarnations and changes of meaning.Liquid Modernity concludes the analysis undertaken in Bauman's two previous books Globalization: The Human Consequences and In Search of Politics. Together these volumes form a brilliant analysis of the changing conditions of social and political life by one of the most original thinkers writing today.

Author: Alan Aldridge
Publisher: Polity Press
Release: 2000
Summary: In this wide-ranging and accessible book, Alan Aldridge reviews the contribution sociologists have made to our understanding of the role of religion in society.The founders of sociology thought that religion and magic were being replaced by science and technology. Some, such as Marx, saw this as a liberation. Others, including Comte, invented substitute religions, none of which has survived. Today many sociologists believe religion has lost social significance. Yet current affairs and everyday experience provide evidence of religion's continuing importance. The book examines the resurgence of fundamentalism in Christianity, Judaism and Islam. It also explores the reasons why conservative movements such as Jehovah's Witnesses and Mormons have been so successful in gaining recruits. A conventional view of sexuality and gender roles is a striking feature of all these movements.The rise of consumer society does not necessarily spell the end of religion. A growing number of sociologists argue that religion benefits from a free market, where religious 'firms' are sensitive to their customers' needs. Consumerism, Aldridge suggests, may bring a religious revival and an evolution of new forms of religion fit for a new millennium.

Author: Jenny Wade
Publisher: Paraview Pocket Books
Release: 2004
Summary:
IT'S NOT JUST SEX. IT'S NOT JUST LOVE. IT'S SOMETHING MORE....
But what could be better than sex? How about lovemaking that sweeps people into new realities, producing altered states of consciousness a thousand times more powerful than the most earth-shattering orgasm? Lovemaking so spectacular that it truly is a religious experience?
"Transcendent Sex" is not about the "Tantric method." It is about the best-kept secret in human history: that ordinary people, with no special training, can find themselves in different spiritual realms when making love -- an experience so profound that nothing will ever be the same. It is about sex that triggers episodes identical to the highest spiritual states -- as described in the annals of shamanism, yoga, Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, and Islam -- including visions, channeling, reliving past lives, transcending the laws of physics, and seeing the face of God.
This revealing book tells of lovers who engaged in sex as usual and suddenly found the veil between the worlds torn open. "Transcendent Sex," like any other spiritual awakening, changes lives. Atheists have become believers; long-standing psychological wounds have been healed; and the sexually abused have become whole. These are the inspiring, incredible true stories of people who experienced an ecstasy and fulfillment beyond the borders of this world.


Author: M. Scott Peck
Publisher: Free Press
Release: 2005
Summary: When M. Scott Peck wrote "People of the Lie" in 1983 he offered readers a fascinating glimpse into the human face of evil. His spiritual/psychological profile of people who were narcissistic as well as evil was especially disturbing because so many of us have faced relatives, co-workers, and even spouses with this destructive combination. However, one of his most chilling chapters in that book was titled "Of Possession and Exorcism," in which he explored an even more sinister form of evil—the possibility that the devil and smaller demonic spirits could entrench themselves into a human's soul. That chapter briefly described two clients who Peck believed were possessed by the devil. Ultimately he performed an exorcism with each client.
In "Glimpses of the Devil", Peck returns to this dark and controversial chapter, expanding upon his beliefs in demonic possession. Like many science-educated professionals, Peck was a skeptic when it came to believing in the devil. But here he gives readers the complete story of his conversion as well as a full account of the two clinical cases that made him a believer as well as an exorcist. Because he videotaped the exorcisms, the dialog and scene work is stunningly authentic and convincing.
Some have criticized this discussion as disappointingly dry. One might argue that Peck's restraint when it comes to dramatics and sensationalism is this book's strength. Peck's mission is not to entertain, but rather to request a more expansive discussion of evil, so that science entertains the possibility of the devil and demonic entities. He also hopes that we will begin a serious discussion of interventions against demonic possession that aren't limited to the restraints of the Catholic Church.
Fans of Peck may also discover an unexpected gift within this controversial discussion. Peck is now an elder. Once a best-selling icon, he is aging into humbleness, comfortably admitting his mistakes and arrogance when it came to those early exorcisms. This softness and humility seem to elevate his authority, and we can only hope that he will offer more books from this voice in the years to come. --"Gail Hudson"


Author: J.D.F. Jones
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (Trade Division)
Release: 2002
Summary:

Author: Martin Seligman
Publisher: Free Press
Release: 2004
Summary:
In this national bestseller -- Martin Seligman's most stimulating, persuasive book to date -- the acclaimed author of "Learned Optimism" introduces yet another revolutionary idea. Drawing on groundbreaking scientific research, Seligman shows how Positive Psychology is shifting the profession's paradigm away from its narrow-minded focus on pathology, victimology, and mental illness to positive emotion and mental health. Happiness, studies show, is not the result of good genes or luck. It can be cultivated by identifying and nurturing traits that we already possess -- including kindness, originality, humor, optimism, and generosity.
Seligman provides the tools you need in order to ascertain your most positive traits or strengths. Then he explains how, by frequently calling upon these "signature strengths" in all the crucial realms of life -- health, relationships, career -- you will not only develop natural buffers against misfortune and negative emotion, but also achieve new and sustainable levels of authentic contentment, gratification, and meaning.


Author: Christopher Locke
Publisher: Perseus Publishing
Release: 2003
Summary: With "The Bombast Transcripts", Christopher Locke (a.k.a. RageBoy, that iconoclastic cybervoice of dissonance, disdain, and all things provocative) is leaping from your screen to your bookshelf. Look out. The scathing rants from the creator of "Entropy Gradient Reversals"--probably the most wittily outrageous, cryptically observant, and eagerly puzzled-over Web zine ever to pollute the airwaves--are explosive.
As a tag, "screed" is only partly accurate for the contents of this volatile collection; they're long harangues, all right, but by no means monotonous. Listen in as Locke lets his alter ego loose in friendly chat with IBM's Lou Gerstner (well, actually an exit interview with Lew Firstner, pompous and clueless chairman of the 666 Corporation). As he not-so-clearly illustrates what "getting it" means (by pondering T.S. Kuhn, voodoo ceremonies, and a sacred space you can't enter with your mind on, let alone your shoes). And as he gleefully admits that most of his readers "seem to enjoy abstruse and obfuscatory exegeses on themes that utterly elude them" but apparently "alleviates their anxiety about not knowing anything that wasn't covered by Geraldo." Don't be insulted; be alleviated. Locke may indeed be the Web's most acerbic gonzo journalist and techno-semiotic social critic, but he's also written for "Forbes"; worked for MCI, Ricoh, and the Japanese government's AI project; and been named one of the top 50 business thinkers in the world. If you missed out on this cyberpundit's irreverent rants the first time around, catch him now (if you can). As Locke himself reminds us, "Being totally insane is hard work. People don't realize that." They should now. "--S. Ketchum"


Author: Christopher Locke
Publisher: Perseus Books Group
Release: 2002
Summary: The coauthor of the no-more-business-as-usual blockbuster "The Cluetrain Manifesto"--which basically told Net-age marketers to stop talking "at" their markets and start conversing "with" them--follows up with a book that's more a highly entertaining, nimbly erudite screed against our current mass-market, mass-media culture than it is a recipe book for e-commerce marketing success in the post-cyberboom era. Writing in a paler imitation of the profanely irreverent, freely associative "gonzo" journalism style pioneered by his obvious idol Hunter S. Thompson, Locke starts with the by-now-familiar idea that old-style mass-marketing "broadcast" advertising just won't work on the Web. Indeed, he says, conventional print-ad tactics as embodied online by banners and pop-ups might actually generate more ill will than sales, and that's why companies must use the Web to somehow enjoin their products and services to the quirky niche interests of the gazillion individual cybercommunities (or "micromarkets") whose greatest advantage for marketers is how freely and speedily their members talk among themselves, touting a brand when and if it's truly deserved.
Useful examples of such enjoinment don't appear until a slim, penultimate chapter, and they are mostly theoretical in nature, e.g., what if Ford, after giving its employees worldwide free home computers and Net access (which it did), got all of them who were into organic gardening to infiltrate organic-gardening Web communities to push (via the subtle art of persuasion, one supposes) the niftiness of Ford pickups for organic gardeners? Truth be told, Locke seems more like a social critic or humanist at heart than a marketing consultant, and his essential disdain for corporations (which are anti-human, he declares, despite all their philanthropic tootle) leaves the reader wondering whether he really wants e-commerce to effectively pervade the Web's truly democratic, populist microcommunities for its own purposes. As his wonderfully cranky cult Web zine, "Entropy Gradient Reversals", and his alter ego therein, RageBoy, have proven, the man's a smart, witty, broadly read cyberpundit. In "Gonzo Marketing", he tweaks everyone from Disney, Time Warner AOL, and IBM to fellow biz-book writers like Seth Godin ("Permission Marketing"), and if you read it first for its own eclectic, acerbic delights and second for a postboom e-marketing primer, you'll be rightly pleased. "--Timothy Murphy"


Author: Christopher Locke, Rick Levine, Doc Searls, David Weinberger
Publisher: Perseus Books Group
Release: 2001
Summary: How would you classify a book that begins with the salutation, "People of Earth..."? While the captains of industry might dismiss it as mere science fiction, "The Cluetrain Manifesto" is definitely of this day and age. Aiming squarely at the solar plexus of corporate America, authors Christopher Locke, Rick Levine, Doc Searls, and David Weinberger show how the Internet is turning business upside down. They proclaim that, thanks to conversations taking place on Web sites and message boards, and in e-mail and chat rooms, employees and customers alike have found voices that undermine the traditional command-and-control hierarchy that organizes most corporate marketing groups. "Markets are conversations," the authors write, and those conversations are "getting smarter faster than most companies." In their view, the lowly customer service rep wields far more power and influence in today's marketplace than the well-oiled front office PR machine.
"The Cluetrain Manifesto" began as a Web site (www.cluetrain.com) in 1999 when the authors, who have worked variously at IBM, Sun Microsystems, the "Linux Journal", and NPR, posted 95 theses that pronounced what they felt was the new reality of the networked marketplace. For example, thesis no. 2: "Markets consist of human beings, not demographic sectors"; thesis no. 20: "Companies need to realize their markets are often laughing. At them"; thesis no. 62: "Markets do not want to talk to flacks and hucksters. They want to participate in the conversations going on behind the corporate firewall"; thesis no. 74: "We are immune to advertising. Just forget it." The book enlarges on these themes through seven essays filled with dozens of stories and observations about how business gets done in America and how the Internet will change it all. While "Cluetrain" will strike many as loud and over the top, the message itself remains quite relevant and unique. This book is for anyone interested in the Internet and e-commerce, and is especially important for those businesses struggling to navigate the topography of the wired marketplace. All aboard! "--Harry C. Edwards"


Author: Gillian Gill
Publisher: Perseus Books Group
Release: 1999
Summary: The feminist perspective of historian Gillian Gill (author of a previous biography of Agatha Christie) adds three-dimensionality to the life story of the controversial, charismatic founder of Christian Science. Neither unblemished saint nor unscrupulous manipulator, Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) emerges in this substantive reassessment as a powerful woman so constrained by conventional notions of femininity that she suffered decades of frustration and ill health before liberating herself with radical new ideas. Her emphasis on spiritual healing and women's empowerment made enemies virtually from the first publication of "Science and Health" in 1875; the schisms and lawsuits that plagued her church gave Eddy's opponents ammunition. In her thorough coverage of such touchy matters, Gill doesn't deny her subject's imperiousness and tendency to paranoia, but her sympathetic analysis stresses Eddy's gifts as a religious leader, administrator, and propagandist. The author gained access to the closely guarded Christian Science archives without ceding editorial control, and her scrupulous effort to freshly judge every issue justifies this trust. Gill's dry wit and first-person presence in the text's opinions ensure that her lengthy, exhaustively documented narrative doesn't feel unduly daunting or academic. "--Wendy Smith"

Author: Gigliola Gori
Publisher: Frank Cass
Release: 2004
Summary:
This is the first text to examine women and sport in Italy during the period 1861-1945. To qualify and quantify the impact of fascism on Italian women's sport, the author first examines the pre-fascist period in terms of female physical culture. The text then describes how during the fascist era, women moved strictly within a framework designed by medicine and eugenics, religious, and traditional education. The country aspired to emancipation, as promised by the fascist revolution, but emancipation was hard to advance under the fascist regime because of male hegemonic trends in the country. This book shows how the engagement of women in some sporting activity did promote and support some gender emancipation.


Author: J. A. Mangan
Publisher: Frank Cass
Release: 2000
Summary:
This volume dealing with the male body in the iconography of fascism reflects an ambition rather than an achievement. The supremacy of the global fascist superman never became a reality but was certainly an intention. This work explores the use of the image of the male body for this purpose in European, American and Asian fascism of varying degrees and various interpretations, and the differences and similarities involved. Among the similarities isthe fact that sport in all the cases in this volume was at the centre of the induction of the male body (and mind) into martial self-sacrifice. Sport was an important part of fascist socialization. The reasons are not hard to find. Sport develops muscle and muscle is equated with power - literally and metaphorically. War, the essence of fascism, demands physical fitness and sport helps promote this fitness. Competitive sport can help develop attitudes of aggression and aggression is essential in war.


Author: Richard P. Bentall
Publisher: Penguin Global
Release: 2004
Summary: Today most of us accept the consensus that madness is a medical condition: an illness, which can be identified, classified and treated with drugs like any other.
In this ground breaking and controversial work Richard Bentall shatters the myths that surround madness. He shows there is no reassuring dividing line between mental health and mental illness. Severe mental disorders can no longer be reduced to brain chemistry, but must be understood psychologically, as part of normal behaviour and human nature.
Bentall argues that we need a radically new way of thinking about psychosis and its treatment. Could it be that it is a fear of madness, rather than the madness itself, that is our problem?


Author: Miguel Serrano
Publisher: Routledge and K. Paul
Release: 1972
Summary:

Author: Mary Daly
Publisher: Women's Press, Limited, The
Release: 2001
Summary: In this exhilarating journey into the interior of language, eminent philosopher Mary Daly reveals the patriarchal construction of language and religious imagery, offering imaginative and daring alternatives. A classic of radical feminism.

Author: Kenneth Conboy, James Morrison
Publisher: University Press of Kansas
Release: 2002
Summary: Defiance against Chinese oppression has been a defining characteristic of Tibetan life for more than four decades, symbolized most visibly by the much revered Dalai Lama. But the story of Tibetan resistance weaves a far richer tapestry than anyone might have imagined.
Kenneth Conboy and James Morrison reveal how America's Central Intelligence Agency encouraged Tibet's revolt against China--and eventually came to control its fledgling resistance movement. They provide the first comprehensive, as well as most compelling account of this little known agency enterprise.
"The CIA's Secret War in Tibet" takes readers from training camps in the Colorado Rockies to the scene of clandestine operations in the Himalayas, chronicling the agency's help in securing the Dalai Lama's safe passage to India and subsequent initiation of one of the most remote covert campaigns of the Cold War. Conboy and Morrison provide previously unreported details about secret missions undertaken in extraordinarily harsh conditions. Their book greatly expands on previous memoirs by CIA officials by putting virtually every major agency participant on record with details of clandestine operations. It also calls as witnesses the people who managed and fought in the program--including Tibetan and Nepalese agents, Indian intelligence officers, and even mission aircrews.
Conboy and Morrison take pains to tell the story from all perspectives, particularly that of the former Tibetan guerrillas, many of whom have gone on record here for the first time. The authors also tell how Tibet led America and India to become secret partners over the course of several presidential administrations and cite dozens of Indian and Tibetan intelligence documents directly related to these covert operations.
As the movement for Tibetan liberation continues to attract international support, Tibet's status remains a contentious issue in both Washington and Beijing. This book takes readers inside a covert war fought with Tibetan blood and U.S. sponsorship and allows us to better understand the true nature of that controversy.
This book is part of the "Modern War Studies" series.


Author: Mircea Eliade
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 2005
Summary:
This founding work of the history of religions, first published in English in 1954, secured the North American reputation of the Romanian émigré-scholar Mircea Eliade (1907-1986). Making reference to an astonishing number of cultures and drawing on scholarship published in no less than half a dozen European languages, Eliade's "The Myth of the Eternal Return" makes both intelligible and compelling the religious expressions and activities of a wide variety of archaic and "primitive" religious cultures. While acknowledging that a return to the "archaic" is no longer possible, Eliade passionately insists on the value of understanding this view in order to enrich our contemporary imagination of what it is to be human. Jonathan Z. Smith's new introduction provides the contextual background to the book and presents a critical outline of Eliade's argument in a way that encourages readers to engage in an informed conversation with this classic text.


Author: Mircea Eliade
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 2004
Summary:
First published in 1951, "Shamanism" soon became the standard work in the study of this mysterious and fascinating phenomenon. Writing as the founder of the modern study of the history of religion, Romanian émigré--scholar Mircea Eliade (1907-1986) surveys the practice of Shamanism over two and a half millennia of human history, moving from the Shamanic traditions of Siberia and Central Asia--where Shamanism was first observed--to North and South America, Indonesia, Tibet, China, and beyond. In this authoritative survey, Eliade illuminates the magico-religious life of societies that give primacy of place to the figure of the Shaman--at once magician and medicine man, healer and miracle-doer, priest, mystic, and poet. Synthesizing the approaches of psychology, sociology, and ethnology, "Shamanism" will remain for years to come the reference book of choice for those intrigued by this practice.


Author: Dagmar Herzog
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 2005
Summary:
What is the relationship between sexual and other kinds of politics? Few societies have posed this puzzle as urgently, or as disturbingly, as Nazi Germany. What exactly were Nazism's sexual politics? Were they repressive for everyone, or were some individuals and groups given sexual license while others were persecuted, tormented, and killed? How do we make sense of the evolution of postwar interpretations of Nazism's sexual politics? What do we make of the fact that scholars from the 1960s to the present have routinely asserted that the Third Reich was "sex-hostile"?
In response to these and other questions, "Sex after Fascism" fundamentally reconceives central topics in twentieth-century German history. Among other things, it changes the way we understand the immense popular appeal of the Nazi regime and the nature of antisemitism, the role of Christianity in the consolidation of postfascist conservatism in the West, the countercultural rebellions of the 1960s-1970s, as well as the negotiations between government and citizenry under East German communism. Beginning with a new interpretation of the Third Reich's sexual politics and ending with the revisions of Germany's past facilitated by communism's collapse, "Sex after Fascism" examines the intimately intertwined histories of capitalism and communism, pleasure and state policies, religious renewal and secularizing trends.
A history of sexual attitudes and practices in twentieth-century Germany, investigating such issues as contraception, pornography, and theories of sexual orientation, "Sex after Fascism" also demonstrates how Germans made sexuality a key site for managing the memory and legacies of Nazism and the Holocaust.


Author: Richard Wolin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 2004
Summary:
Fifteen years ago, revelations about the political misdeeds of Martin Heidegger and Paul de Man sent shock waves throughout European and North American intellectual circles. Ever since, postmodernism has been haunted by the specter of a compromised past. In this intellectual genealogy of the postmodern spirit, Richard Wolin shows that postmodernism's infatuation with fascism has been widespread and not incidental. He calls into question postmodernism's claim to have inherited the mantle of the left--and suggests that postmodern thought has long been smitten with the opposite end of the political spectrum.
In probing chapters on C. G. Jung, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Georges Bataille, and Maurice Blanchot, Wolin discovers an unsettling commonality: during the 1930s, these thinkers leaned to the right and were tainted by a proverbial "fascination with fascism." Frustrated by democracy's shortcomings, they were seduced by fascism's grandiose promises of political regeneration. The dictatorships in Italy and Germany promised redemption from the uncertainties of political liberalism. But, from the beginning, there could be no doubting their brutal methods of racism, violence, and imperial conquest.
Postmodernism's origins among the profascist literati of the 1930s reveal a dark political patrimony. The unspoken affinities between Counter-Enlightenment and postmodernism constitute the guiding thread of Wolin's suggestive narrative. In their mutual hostility toward reason and democracy, postmodernists and the advocates of Counter-Enlightenment betray a telltale strategic alliance--they cohabit the fraught terrain where far left and far right intersect.
Those who take Wolin's conclusions to heart will never view the history of modern thought in quite the same way.


Author: Aristotle
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1995
Summary:
The Oxford Translation of Aristotle was originally published in 12 volumes between 1912 and 1954. It is universally recognized as the standard English version of Aristotle. This revised edition contains the substance of the original Translation, slightly emended in light of recent scholarship; three of the original versions have been replaced by new translations; and a new and enlarged selection of Fragments has been added. The aim of the translation remains the same: to make the surviving works of Aristotle readily accessible to English speaking readers.


Author: C. G. Jung, Gerhard Adler, R. F.C. Hull
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1970
Summary:
Essays bearing on the contemporary scene and on the relation of the individual to society, including papers written during the 1920s and 1930s focusing on the upheaval in Germany, and two major works of Jung's last years, "The Undiscovered Self" and "Flying Saucers."


Author: Lisa Mcgirr
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 2002
Summary:
In the early 1960s, American conservatives seemed to have fallen on hard times. McCarthyism was on the run, and movements on the political left were grabbing headlines. The media lampooned John Birchers's accusations that Dwight Eisenhower was a communist puppet. Mainstream America snickered at warnings by California Congressman James B. Utt that "barefooted Africans" were training in Georgia to help the United Nations take over the country. Yet, in Utt's home district of Orange County, thousands of middle-class suburbanites proceeded to organize a powerful conservative movement that would land Ronald Reagan in the White House and redefine the spectrum of acceptable politics into the next century.
"Suburban Warriors" introduces us to these people: women hosting coffee klatches for Barry Goldwater in their tract houses; members of anticommunist reading groups organizing against sex education; pro-life Democrats gradually drawn into conservative circles; and new arrivals finding work in defense companies and a sense of community in Orange County's mushrooming evangelical churches. We learn what motivated them and how they interpreted their political activity. Lisa McGirr shows that their movement was not one of marginal people suffering from status anxiety, but rather one formed by successful entrepreneurial types with modern lifestyles and bright futures. She describes how these suburban pioneers created new political and social philosophies anchored in a fusion of Christian fundamentalism, xenophobic nationalism, and western libertarianism.
While introducing these rank-and-file activists, McGirr chronicles Orange County's rise from "nut country" to political vanguard. Through this history, she traces the evolution of the New Right from a virulent anticommunist, anti-establishment fringe to a broad national movement nourished by evangelical Protestantism. Her original contribution to the social history of politics broadens--and often upsets--our understanding of the deep and tenacious roots of popular conservatism in America.


Author: John Mueller
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 2001
Summary:
Democracy is overrated. Capitalism, on the other hand, doesn't get enough credit. In this provocative and engaging book, John Mueller argues that these mismatches between image and reality create significant political and economic problems--inspiring instability, inefficiency, and widespread cynicism. We would be far better off, he writes, if we recognized that neither system is ideal or disastrous and accepted instead the humdrum truth that both are "pretty good." And, to Mueller, that means good enough. He declares that what is true of Garrison Keillor's fictional store "Ralph's Pretty Good Grocery" is also true of democracy and capitalism: if you can't get what you want there, "you can probably get along without it."
Mueller begins by noting that capitalism is commonly thought to celebrate greed and to require discourtesy, deceit, and callousness. However, with examples that range from car dealerships and corporate boardrooms to the shop of an eighteenth-century silk merchant, Mueller shows that capitalism in fact tends to reward behavior that is honest, fair, civil, and compassionate. He argues that this gap between image and reality hampers economic development by encouraging people to behave dishonestly, unfairly, and discourteously to try to get ahead and to neglect the virtuous behavior that is an important source of efficiency and gain.
The problem with democracy's image, by contrast, is that our expectations are too high. We are too often led by theorists, reformers, and romantics to believe that democracy should consist of egalitarianism and avid civic participation. In fact, democracy will always be chaotic, unequal, and marked by apathy. It offers reasonable freedom and security, but not political paradise. To idealize democracy, Mueller writes, is to undermine it, since the inevitable contrast with reality creates public cynicism and can hamper democracy's growth and development.
Mueller presents these arguments with sophistication, wit, and erudition. He combines mastery of current political and economic literature with references to figures ranging from Plato to P. T. Barnum, from Immanuel Kant to Ronald Reagan, from Shakespeare to Frank Capra. Broad in scope and rich in detail, the book will provoke debate among economists, political scientists, and anyone interested in the problems (or non-problems) of modern democracy and capitalism.


Author: Wade Clark Roof
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 2001
Summary:
In large chain bookstores the "religion" section is gone and in its place is an expanding number of topics including angels, Sufism, journey, recovery, meditation, magic, inspiration, Judaica, astrology, gurus, Bible, prophesy, evangelicalism, Mary, Buddhism, Catholicism, and esoterica. As Wade Clark Roof notes, such changes over the last two decades reflect a shift away from religion as traditionally understood to more diverse and creative approaches. But what does this splintering of the religious perspective say about Americans? Have we become more interested in spiritual concerns or have we become lost among trends? Do we value personal spirituality over traditional religion and no longer see ourselves united in a larger community of faith? Roof first credited this religious diversity to the baby boomers in his bestselling "A Generation of Seekers" (1993). He returns to interview many of these people, now in mid-life, to reveal a generation with a unique set of spiritual values--a generation that has altered our historic interpretations of religious beliefs, practices, and symbols, and perhaps even our understanding of the sacred itself.
The quest culture created by the baby boomers has generated a "marketplace" of new spiritual beliefs and practices and of revisited traditions. As Roof shows, some Americans are exploring faiths and spiritual disciplines for the first time; others are rediscovering their lost traditions; others are drawn to small groups and alternative communities; and still others create their own mix of values and metaphysical beliefs. "Spiritual Marketplace" charts the emergence of five subcultures: dogmatists, born-again Christians, mainstream believers, metaphysical believers and seekers, and secularists. Drawing on surveys and in-depth interviews for over a decade, Roof reports on the religious and spiritual styles, family patterns, and moral vision and values for each of these subcultures. The result is an innovative, engaging approach to understanding how religious life is being reshaped as we move into the next century.


Author: Henry Corbin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1998
Summary:
"Henry Corbin's works are the best guide to the visionary tradition.... Corbin, like Scholem and Jonas, is remembered as a scholar of genius. He was uniquely equipped not only to recover Iranian Sufism for the West, but also to defend the principal Western traditions of esoteric spirituality."--From the introduction by Harold Bloom
Ibn 'Arabi (1165-1240) was one of the great mystics of all time. Through the richness of his personal experience and the constructive power of his intellect, he made a unique contribution to Shi'ite Sufism. In this book, which features a powerful new preface by Harold Bloom, Henry Corbin brings us to the very core of this movement with a penetrating analysis of Ibn 'Arabi's life and doctrines.
Corbin begins with a kind of spiritual topography of the twelfth century, emphasizing the differences between exoteric and esoteric forms of Islam. He also relates Islamic mysticism to mystical thought in the West. The remainder of the book is devoted to two complementary essays: on "Sympathy and Theosophy" and "Creative Imagination and Creative Prayer." A section of notes and appendices includes original translations of numerous Su fi treatises.
Harold Bloom's preface links Sufi mysticism with Shakespeare's visionary dramas and high tragedies, such as "The Tempest" and "Hamlet". These works, he writes, intermix the empirical world with a transcendent element. Bloom shows us that this Shakespearean cosmos is analogous to Corbin's "Imaginal Realm" of the Sufis, the place of soul or souls.


Author: Sigmund Freud, C. G. Jung
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1994
Summary:
This abridged edition makes the Freud/Jung correspondence accessible to a general readership at a time of renewed critical and historical reevaluation of the documentary roots of modern psychoanalysis. This edition reproduces William McGuire's definitive introduction, but does not contain the critical apparatus of the original edition.


Author: Jean Seznec
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1953
Summary:
The gods of Olympus died with the advent of Christianity--or so we have been taught to believe. But how are we to account for their tremendous popularity during the Renaissance? This illustrated book, now reprinted in a new, larger paperback format, offers the general reader first a discussion of mythology in late antiquity and the Middle Ages, and then a multifaceted look at the far-reaching role played by mythology in Renaissance intellectual and emotional life.


Author: Henry Corbin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1989
Summary:
An analysis of interrelated themes in Iranian religion, including the angelology of Mazdaism and Islamic Shi'ite concepts of spirit-body identity.


Author: C. G. Jung
Publisher: Princeton Univ Pr
Release: 1989
Summary: A discussion of the psychological and philosophical implications of events in Germany during and immediately following the Nazi period. The essays--"The Fight with the Shadow," "Wotan," "Psychotherapy Today," "Psychotherapy and a Philosophy of Life," "After the Catastrophe," and an Epilogue--are extracted from Volumes 10 and 16.

Author: C. G. Jung
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1987
Summary:
A collection of journalistic interviews which span Jung's lifetime. This book captures his personality and spirit in more than 50 accounts of talks and meetings with him. They range from transcripts of interviews for radio, television, and film to memoirs written by notable personalities.


Author: C. G. Jung, Gerhard Adler, R. F.C. Hull
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1980
Summary:
A study of the analogies between alchemy, Christian dogma, and psychological symbolism. Revised translation, with new bibliography and index.


Author: Joseph Campbell
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1979
Summary:
Essays by Julius Baum, C. G. Jung, C. Kerényi, Hans Leisegang, Paul Masson-Oursel, Fritz Meier, Jean de Menasce, Georges Nagel, Walter F. Otto, Max Pulver, Hugo Rahner, Paul Schmitt, and Walter Wili.


Author: C. G. Jung
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1973
Summary:
Extracted from Volume 8. A parapsychological study of the meaningful coincidence of events, extrasensory perception, and similar phenomena.


Author: Joseph Campbell
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1972
Summary: Originally written by Campbell in the '40s-- in his pre-Bill Moyers days -- and famous as George Lucas' inspiration for "Star Wars," this book will likewise inspire any writer or reader in its well considered assertion that while all stories have already been told, this is *not* a bad thing, since the *retelling* is still necessary. And while our own life's journey must always be ended alone, the travel is undertaken in the company not only of immediate loved ones and primal passion, but of the heroes and heroines -- and myth-cycles -- that have preceded us.

Author: Mircea Eliade
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1970
Summary:
In this landmark book the renowned scholar of religion Mircea Eliade lays the groundwork for a Western understanding of Yoga, exploring how its guiding principle, that of freedom, involves remaining in the world without letting oneself be exhausted by such "conditionings" as time and history. Drawing on years of study and experience in India, Eliade provides a comprehensive survey of Yoga in theory and practice from its earliest foreshadowings in the Vedas through the twentieth century. The subjects discussed include Patañjali, author of the Yoga-sutras; yogic techniques, such as concentration "on a Single Point," postures, and respiratory discipline; and Yoga in relation to Brahmanism, Buddhism, Tantrism, Oriental alchemy, mystical erotism, and shamanism.


Author: C. G. Jung
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1999
Summary:
"Kundalini yoga presented Jung with a model of something that was almost completely lacking in Western psychology--an account of the development phases of higher consciousness.... Jung's insistence on the psychogenic and symbolic significance of such states is even more timely now than then. As R. D. Laing stated... 'It was Jung who broke the ground here, but few followed him.'"--From the introduction by Sonu Shamdasani
Jung's seminar on Kundalini yoga, presented to the Psychological Club in Zurich in 1932, has been widely regarded as a milestone in the psychological understanding of Eastern thought and of the symbolic transformations of inner experience. Kundalini yoga presented Jung with a model for the developmental phases of higher consciousness, and he interpreted its symbols in terms of the process of individuation. With sensitivity toward a new generation's interest in alternative religions and psychological exploration, Sonu Shamdasani has brought together the lectures and discussions from this seminar. In this volume, he re-creates for today's reader the fascination with which many intellectuals of prewar Europe regarded Eastern spirituality as they discovered more and more of its resources, from yoga to tantric texts. Reconstructing this seminar through new documentation, Shamdasani explains, in his introduction, why Jung thought that the comprehension of Eastern thought was essential if Western psychology was to develop. He goes on to orient today's audience toward an appreciation of some of the questions that stirred the minds of Jung and his seminar group: What is the relation between Eastern schools of liberation and Western psychotherapy? What connection is there between esoteric religious traditions and spontaneous individual experience? What light do the symbols of Kundalini yoga shed on conditions diagnosed as psychotic? Not only were these questions important to analysts in the 1930s but, as Shamdasani stresses, they continue to have psychological relevance for readers on the threshold of the twenty-first century. This volume also offers newly translated material from Jung's German language seminars, a seminar by the indologist Wilhelm Hauer presented in conjunction with that of Jung, illustrations of the cakras, and Sir John Woodroffe's classic translation of the tantric text, the "Sat-cakra Nirupana."


Author: Steven M. Wasserstrom
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1999
Summary:
By the end of World War II, religion appeared to be on the decline throughout the United States and Europe. Recent world events had cast doubt on the relevance of religious belief, and modernizing trends made religious rituals look out of place. It was in this atmosphere that the careers of Scholem, Eliade, and Corbin--the twentieth century's legendary scholars in the respective fields of Judaism, History of Religions, and Islam--converged and ultimately revolutionized how people thought about religion. Between 1949 and 1978, all three lectured to Carl Jung's famous Eranos circle in Ascona, Switzerland, where each in his own way came to identify the symbolism of mystical experience as a central element of his monotheistic tradition. In this, the first book ever to compare the paths taken by these thinkers, Steven Wasserstrom explores how they overturned traditional approaches to studying religion by de-emphasizing law, ritual, and social history and by extolling the role of myth and mysticism. The most controversial aspect of their theory of religion, Wasserstrom argues, is that it minimized the binding character of moral law associated with monotheism.
The author focuses on the lectures delivered by Scholem, Eliade, and Corbin to the Eranos participants, but also shows how these scholars generated broader interest in their ideas through radio talks, poetry, novels, short stories, autobiographies, and interviews. He analyzes their conception of religion from a broadly integrated, comparative perspective, sets their distinctive thinking into historical and intellectual context, and interprets the striking success of their approaches.


Author: Bernard S. Cohn
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Release: 1996
Summary:
Bernard Cohn's interest in the construction of Empire as an intellectual and cultural phenomenon has set the agenda for the academic study of modern Indian culture for over two decades. His earlier publications have shown how dramatic British innovations in India, including revenue and legal systems, led to fundamental structural changes in Indian social relations. This collection of his writings in the last fifteen years discusses areas in which the colonial impact has generally been overlooked. The essays form a multifaceted exploration of the ways in which the British discovery, collection, and codification of information about Indian society contributed to colonial cultural hegemony and political control.
Cohn argues that the British Orientalists' study of Indian languages was important to the colonial project of control and command. He also asserts that an arena of colonial power that seemed most benign and most susceptible to indigenous influences--mostly law--in fact became responsible for the institutional reactivation of peculiarly British notions about how to regulate a colonial society made up of "others." He shows how the very Orientalist imagination that led to brilliant antiquarian collections, archaeological finds, and photographic forays were in fact forms of constructing an India that could be better packaged, inferiorized, and ruled. A final essay on cloth suggests how clothes have been part of the history of both colonialism and anticolonialism.


Author: Jack Finney
Publisher: Touchstone
Release: 1998
Summary:
On a quiet fall evening in the small, peaceful town of Mill Valley, California, Dr. Miles Bennell discovered an insidious, horrifying plot. Silently, subtly, almost imperceptibly, alien life-forms were taking over the bodies and minds of his neighbors, his friends, his family, the woman he loved -- the world as he knew it.
First published in 1955, this classic thriller of the ultimate alien invasion and the triumph of the human spirit over an invisible enemy inspired three major motion pictures.


Author: William J. Bennett
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Release: 1996
Summary:
More than two million readers have used "The Book of Virtues," the nationwide #1 bestseller by William J. Bennett, to help their families learn the essential traits of good character.
"The Moral Compass," the inspiring and instructive companion volume to "The Book of Virtues," offers many more examples of good and bad, right and wrong, in great works from literature and in exemplary stories from history. Organized by the stages along life's journey, these stories and poems serve as reference points on a moral compass, guiding the reader through the ethical and spiritual challenges along the pathway of life: leaving home, entering into marriage, easing the burdens of others, nurturing one's children, and fulfilling the obligations of citizenship and leadership.
Drawn from familiar Western history and mythology as well as a wide selection of tales and folklore from Asia, Africa, and Latin America, the stories in "The Moral Compass" are literary and evocative, designed to inspire as well as instruct. Complete with informative introductions and notes, "The Moral Compass" is an indispensable guide that will help family members meet the challenges of life at any age.


Author: Richard J. Herrnstein, Charles Murray
Publisher: Free Press
Release: 1996
Summary:
The seminal book about IQ and class that ignited one of the most explosive controversies in decades, now updated with a new Afterword by Charles Murray
Breaking new ground and old taboos, Richard J. Herrnstein and Charles Murray tell the story of a society in transformation. At the top, a cognitive elite is forming in which the passkey to the best schools and the best jobs is no longer social background but high intelligence. At the bottom, the common denominator of the underclass is increasingly low intelligence rather than racial or social disadvantage.
"The Bell Curve" describes the state of scientific knowledge about questions that have been on people's minds for years but have been considered too sensitive to talk about openly -- among them, IQ's relationship to crime, unemployment, welfare, child neglect, poverty, and illegitimacy; ethnic differences in intelligence; trends in fertility among women of different levels of intelligence; and what policy can do -- and cannot do -- to compensate for differences in intelligence. Brilliantly argued and meticulously documented, The Bell Curve is the essential first step in coming to grips with the nation's social problems.


Author: Lewis Mehl-Madrona
Publisher: Scribner
Release: 1997
Summary: Inspired by his Cherokee grandmother's healing ceremonies, Lewis Mehl-Madrona enlightens readers to "alternative" paths to recovery and health. "Coyote Medicine" isn't about eschewing Western medicine when it's effective, but about finding other answers when medicine fails: for chronic sufferers, patients not responding to medication, or "terminal" cases that doctors have given up on. In the story of one doctor's remarkable initiation into alternative ways to spiritual and physical health, "Coyote Medicine" provides the key to untapped healing methods available today.

Author: Green
Publisher: Scribner
Release: 1992
Summary:

Author: Vladimir Nabokov, Alfred Appel Jr.
Publisher: Vintage
Release: 1991
Summary: In 1954 Vladimir Nabokov asked one American publisher to consider "a firebomb that I have just finished putting together." The explosive device: "Lolita," his morality play about a middle-aged European's obsession with a 12-year-old American girl. Two years later, the "New York Times" called it "great art." Other reviewers staked a higher moral ground (the editor of the "London Sunday Express" declaring it "the filthiest book I've ever read"). Since then, the sinuous novel has never ceased to astound. Even Nabokov was astonished by its place in the popular imagination. One biographer writes that "he was quite shocked when a little girl of eight or nine came to his door for candy on Halloween, dressed up by her parents as Lolita." And when it came time to casting the film, Nabokov declared, "Let them find a dwarfess!"
The character Lolita's power now exists almost separately from the endlessly inventive novel. If only it were read as often as it is alluded to. Alfred Appel Jr., editor of the annotated edition, has appended some 900 notes, an exhaustive, good-humored introduction, and a recent preface in which he admits that the "reader familiar with Lolita can approach the apparatus as a separate unit, but the perspicacious student who keeps turning back and forth from text to Notes risks vertigo." No matter. The notes range from translations to the anatomical to the complex textual. Appel is also happy to point out the Great Punster's supposedly unintended word play: he defends the phrase "Beaver Eaters" as "a portmanteau of 'Beefeaters' (the yeoman of the British royal guard) and their beaver hats."


Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
Publisher: Vintage
Release: 1989
Summary: Represents Nietzsche's attempt to sum up his philosophy. In nine parts the book is designed to give the reader a comprehensive idea of Nietzche's thought and style. With an inclusive index of subjects and persons.

Author: C.G. Jung
Publisher: Vintage
Release: 1989
Summary: An autobiography put together from conversations, writings and lectures with Jung's cooperation, at the end of his life.

Author: Alan Watts
Publisher: Vintage
Release: 1989
Summary: Modern Western culture and technology is inextricably tied to the belief in the existence of a self as a separate ego, separated from and in conflict with the rest of the world. In this classic book, Watts provides a lucid and simple presentation of an alternative view based on Hindi and Vedantic philosophy.

Author: Lester Bangs
Publisher: Anchor
Release: 1988
Summary: Vintage presents the paperback edition of the wild and brilliant writings of Lester Bangs--the most outrageous and popular rock critic of the 1970s--edited and with an introduction by the reigning dean of rack critics, Greil Marcus. Advertising in Rolling Stone and other major publications.

Author: Lynn H. Nicholas
Publisher: Knopf
Release: 2005
Summary: To be a child in mid-twentieth-century Europe was to be not a person but an object, available for use in the service of the totalitarian state. Very soon after Adolf Hitler came to power, policies of eugenic selection and euthanasia began to weed ill or disabled children out of the New Order by poison, gas, and starvation. Defect-free “good blood” children were subjected to an “education” based on racism, propaganda, and the glorification of the Führer, and were deliberately deprived of free time that would allow independent thought or action.

Once the war began, “Nordic”-looking children were kidnapped from families in the conquered lands and subjected to “Germanization.” Meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of “bad blood” children—Jews, Gypsies, Poles, Ukrainians, Russians(were separated from their families and condemned to forced migration, slave labor, sadistic experiments, starvation, and mass execution. At the end of the war, uprooted children of every origin wandered the bombed-out cities and countryside, some having been taken from home at such a young age that they did not know where they had come from or even their own names. Millions surged into and out of DP camps, exploited by political and religious groups, while the Allies and the fledgling United Nations tried mightily to put families back together and to find new homes for the orphans.

All the riveting narrative skill and impeccable scholarship that distinguished Lynn Nicholas’s first book, "The Rape of Europa" (winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction), are present in her study of these terrible crimes against humanity. To research this story she has delved into the governmental and military archives of many nations, and has interviewed countless individuals. She shows the relationship of the deadly Nazi policies to the brutal tactics used in the USSR in the 1930s and to their rehearsal in the Spanish Civil War, and vividly describes the abject failure of Hitler’s campaign to plant Germanizing colonies in the conquered nations. She gives us the stories of survivors of ghastly war-spawned famines(in Greece and Russia in the 1940s, Holland in the “Hunger Winter” of 1945, and Berlin in the Airlift year of 1949(and of British, French, and Dutch children who were evacuated to the countryside; boys and girls sent alone from Europe to England on the Kindertransports; the teenaged soldiers of the Reich; the small veterans of the quarries, the factories, and the camps as well as those who survived in lonely hiding.

In "Cruel World" Lynn Nicholas shows us clearly, and with passionate empathy for the innocent victims, the crimes against children that inevitably result when ideology overwhelms humanity. This powerful book, as it recounts the waking nightmare that enmeshed the lives of Europe’s boys and girls, bears witness to our own responsibility to the children of the twenty-first century.


Author: Kevin Starr
Publisher: Knopf
Release: 2004
Summary: In this extraordinary book, Kevin Starr–widely acknowledged as the premier historian of California, the scope of whose scholarship the "Atlantic Monthly" has called “breathtaking”–probes the possible collapse of the California dream in the years 1990—2003. In a series of compelling chapters, "Coast of Dreams" moves through a variety of topics that show the California of the last decade, when the state was sometimes stumbling, sometimes humbled, but, more often, flourishing with its usual panache.

From gang violence in Los Angeles to the spectacular rise–and equally spectacular fall–of Silicon Valley, from the Northridge earthquake to the recall of Governor Gray Davis, Starr ranges over myriad facts, anecdotes, news stories, personal impressions, and analyses to explore a time of unprecedented upheaval in California. "Coast of Dreams" describes an exceptional diversity of people, cultures, and values; an economy that mirrors the economic state of the nation; a battlefield where industry and the necessities of infrastructure collide with the inherent demands of a unique and stunning natural environment. It explores California politics (including Arnold Schwarzenegger’s election in the 2003 recall), the multifaceted business landscape, and controversial icons such as O. J. Simpson.

“Historians of the future,” Starr writes, “will be able to see with more certainty whether or not the period 1990-2003 was not only the end of one California but the beginning of another”; in the meantime, he gives a picture of the place and time in a book at once sweeping and riveting in its details, deeply informed, engagingly personal, and altogether fascinating.


Author: Robert Proctor
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Release: 2003
Summary:
Scholars exploring the history of science under the Nazis have generally concentrated on the Nazi destruction of science or the corruption of intellectual and liberal values. "Racial Hygiene" focuses on how scientists themselves participated in the construction of Nazi racial policy. Robert Proctor demonstrates that the common picture of a passive scientific community coerced into cooperation with the Nazis fails to grasp the reality of what actually happened--namely, that many of the political initiatives of the Nazis arose from within the scientific community, and that medical scientists actively designed and administered key elements of National Socialist policy.
The book presents the most comprehensive account to date of German medical involvement in the sterilization and castration laws, the laws banning marriage between Jews and non-Jews, and the massive program to destroy "lives not worth living:' The study traces attempts on the part of doctors to conceive of the "Jewish problem" as a "medical problem," and how medical journals openly discussed the need to find a "final solution" to Germany's Jewish and gypsy "problems."
Proctor makes us aware that such thinking was not unique to Germany. The social Darwinism of the late nineteenth century in America and Europe gave rise to theories of racial hygiene that were embraced by enthusiasts of various nationalities in the hope of breeding a better, healthier, stronger race of people. Proctor also presents an account of the "organic" health movement that flourished under the Nazis, including campaigns to reduce smoking and drinking, and efforts to require bakeries to produce whole-grain bread. A separate chapter is devoted to the emergence of a resistance movement among doctors in the Association of Socialist Physicians. The book is based on a close analysis of contemporary documents, including German state archives and more than two hundred medical journals published during the period.
Proctor has set out not merely to tell a story but also to urge reflection on what might be called the "political philosophy of science"--how movements that shape the policies of nations can also shape the structure and priorities of science. The broad implications of this book make it of consequence not only to historians, physicians, and people concerned with the history and philosophy of science, but also to those interested in science policy and medical ethics. Scholars exploring the history of science under the Nazis have generally concentrated on the Nazi destruction of science or the corruption of intellectual and liberal values. "Racial Hygiene" focuses on how scientists themselves participated in the construction of Nazi racial policy. Robert Proctor demonstrates that the common picture of a passive scientific community coerced into cooperation with the Nazis fails to grasp the reality of what actually happened--namely, that many of the political initiatives of the Nazis arose from within the scientific community, and that medical scientists actively designed and administered key elements of National Socialist policy.


Author: Hans Moravec
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Release: 1990
Summary: This book does a great job of exploring the future of robots, artificial intelligence, the human mind, and human identity. A few parts of it seem dated, but most of what the book describes seems likely to happen this century and to surprise the large fraction of the population which still hasn't given any thought to the possibilities this book describes.

Author: Maurice Olender
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Release: 1992
Summary:

Author: Daniel Kevles
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Release: 1998
Summary: In the 19th century, when the idea of eugenics (selective breeding to generate superior members of a species) was invited off the farm and into the parlor, it was a far-fetched notion with little possibility of success driven by clearly racist motivations. But at the end of the 20th century, biotechnological techniques and other agendas are making forms of human eugenics plausible. Rich in anecdote, narrative, and fact. An important book.

Author: Michael H. Kater
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Release: 2004
Summary: In modern times, the recruitment of children into a political organization and ideology reached its boldest embodiment in the Hitler Youth, founded in 1933 soon after the Nazi Party assumed power in Germany. Determining that by age ten children�s minds could be turned from play to politics, the regime inducted nearly all German juveniles between the ages of ten and eighteen into its state-run organization. The result was a potent tool for bending young minds and hearts to the will of Adolf Hitler. Baldur von Schirach headed a strict chain of command whose goal was to shift the adolescents� sense of obedience from home and school to the racially defined Volk and the Third Reich. Luring boys and girls into Hitler Youth ranks by offering them status, uniforms, and weekend hikes, the Nazis turned campgrounds into premilitary training sites, air guns into machine guns, sing-alongs into marching drills, instruction into indoctrination, and children into Nazis. A few resisted for personal or political reasons, but the overwhelming majority enlisted. Drawing on original reports, letters, diaries, and memoirs, Kater traces the history of the Hitler Youth, examining the means, degree, and impact of conversion, and the subsequent fate of young recruits. Millions of Hitler Youth joined the armed forces; thousands gleefully participated in the subjugation of foreign peoples and the obliteration of �racial aliens.� Although young, they committed crimes against humanity for which they cannot escape judgment. Their story stands as a harsh reminder of the moral bankruptcy of regimes that make children complicit in crimes of the state.

Author: Michael Hardt, Antonio Negri
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Release: 2001
Summary: "Empire" is a sweeping book with a big-picture vision. Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri argue that while classical imperialism has largely disappeared, a new empire is emerging in a diffuse blend of technology, economics, and globalization. The book brings together unlikely bedfellows: Hardt, associate professor in Duke University's literature program, and Negri, among other things a writer and inmate at Rebibbia Prison in Rome. "Empire" aspires to the same scale of grand political philosophy as Locke or Marx or Fukuyama, but whether Hardt and Negri accomplish this daunting task is debatable. It is, however, an exciting book that is especially timely following the emergence of terrorism as a geopolitical force.
Hardt and Negri maintain that empire--traditionally understood as military or capitalist might--has embarked upon a new stage of historical development and is now better understood as a complex web of sociopolitical forces. They argue, with a neo-Marxist bent, that "the multitude" will transcend and defeat the new empire on its own terms. The authors address everything from the works of Deleuze to Jefferson's constitutional democracy to the Chiapas revolution in a far-ranging analysis of our contemporary situation. Unfortunately, their penchant for references and academese sometimes renders the prose unwieldy. But if Hardt and Negri's vision of the world materializes, they will undoubtedly be remembered as prophetic. "--Eric de Place"


Author: Edward L. Thorndike
Publisher: GoodYear Books
Release: 1996
Summary: Featuring 68,000 words; 34,000 illustrative examples; 900 Usage Notes and Synonym Studies; 1200 full-color photos, fine art, maps, diagrams, and illustrations; full-color theme-spreads on such topics as knights and castles, sculpture, dinosaurs, and space; 18 page reference section; and more! Grades 4-6

Author: Jean-Paul Sartre
Publisher: Washington Square Press
Release: 1993
Summary: Jean-Paul Sartre, the seminal smarty-pants of mid-century thinking, launched the existentialist fleet with the publication of "Being and Nothingness" in 1943. Though the book is thick, dense, and unfriendly to careless readers, it is indispensable to those interested in the philosophy of consciousness and free will. Some of his arguments are fallacious, others are unclear, but for the most part Sartre's thoughts penetrate deeply into fundamental philosophical territory. Basing his conception of self-consciousness loosely on Heidegger's "being," Sartre proceeds to sharply delineate between conscious actions ("for themselves") and unconscious ("in themselves"). It is a conscious choice, he claims, to live one's life "authentically" and in a unified fashion, or not--this is the fundamental freedom of our lives.
Drawing on history and his own rich imagination for examples, Sartre offers compelling supplements to his more formal arguments. The waiter who detaches himself from his job-role sticks in the reader's memory with greater tenacity than the lengthy discussion of inauthentic life and serves to bring the full force of the argument to life. Even if you're not an angst-addicted poet from North Beach, "Being and Nothingness" offers you a deep conversation with a brilliant mind--unfortunately, a rare find these days. "--Rob Lightner"


Author: Harold Bloom
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Release: 1993
Summary: Bloom's argument, that virtually all Americans, from Southern Baptist to New Ager, are "gnostics," no matter what their denominational label, is right on the mark -- even if the tag "gnostic" offends some. What is his definition of a gnostic? 1) there is no higher religious authority than the private individual 2) every individual has the "soul sufficiency" to reach religious truth by themselves 3) external objective expressions of religion like churches, worship, or creeds are at best unnecessary but mostly a block to true spirituality 4) true religion does not need any external forms 5) so, no one can tell me what to believe, and anyone who does is potential threat to religious freedom. THE PROBLEM with Bloom is that this profound analysis of the essential American religious attitude was already made in the 1840s by the great Calvinist theologian John Williamson Nevin in his books "Anxious Bench" and "Antichrist" (available, published by Wiph and Stock). Both Bloom and Nevin are right, American-style Christianity is not Christian at all because it denies the objective presence of Christ in the World through Church, Sacrament, and Creed. In short, it makes the Incarnation irrelevent. What's left is a subjective worship of the self in place of God. We are all popes (but only for ourselves).

Author: Paul Fussell
Publisher: Touchstone
Release: 1992
Summary:
In "Class" Paul Fussell explodes the sacred American myth of social equality with eagle-eyed irreverence and iconoclastic wit. This bestselling, superbly researched, exquisitely observed guide to the signs, symbols, and customs of the American class system is always outrageously on the mark as Fussell shows us how our status is revealed by everything we do, say, and own. He describes the houses, objects, artifacts, speech, clothing styles, and intellectual proclivities of American classes from the top to the bottom and everybody -- you'll surely recognize yourself -- in between. "Class" is guaranteed to amuse and infuriate, whether your class is so high it's out of sight (literally) or you are, alas, a sinking victim of prole drift.


Author: James Hilton
Publisher: Pocket
Release: 1988
Summary: LOST HORIZON is the tale of three men and a woman seeking escape from a political upheaval in the Orient. Their airplane crashes high on a Tibetan plateau. They are saved by a party of natives and taken to Shangri-La.
Finding themselves prisoners at first, then visitors, they soon become willing captives until they discover the secret of that hidden paradise.


Author: Carlos Castaneda
Publisher: Washington Square Press
Release: 1985
Summary:
A YAQUI WAY OF KNOWLEDGE
The teachings of don Juan is the story of a remarkable journey: the first awesome steps on the road to becoming a "man of knowledge" -- the road that continues with "A Separate Reality" and "Journey to Ixtlan."
"For me there is only the traveling on paths that have heart, on any path that may have heart. There I travel, and the only worthwhile challenge is to traverse its full length. And there I travel, looking, looking, breathlessly."
-- Don Juan


Author: M. Scott Peck
Publisher: Touchstone
Release: 1979
Summary: By melding love, science, and religion into a primer on personal growth, M. Scott Peck launched his highly successful writing and lecturing career with this book. Even to this day, Peck remains at the forefront of spiritual psychology as a result of "The Road Less Traveled". In the era of "I'm OK, You're OK", Peck was courageous enough to suggest that "life is difficult" and personal growth is a "complex, arduous and lifelong task." His willingness to expose his own life stories as well as to share the intimate stories of his anonymous therapy clients creates a compelling and heartfelt narrative.

Author: William L. Kelly
Publisher: Prometheus Books
Release: 1990
Summary:

Author: Elof Axel Carlson
Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Release: 2001
Summary: I am going to say it clearly and succinctly: this brand-new book is one of the most important scholarly works of the year. Seeking to understand why some people were poor, homeless, criminally inclined, mentally ill, and in other ways socially inadequate, 19th-century theorists turned to the science of eugenics, the concept of genetically unfit people. This stunning book is an exploration of the profound contemporary resonance of this concept and how it directly contributed to such persecutions as the Holocaust.
Certain individuals were judged "degenerate" as early as biblical times, and the condition was viewed as a punishment for religious transgression. Noted author Elof Axel Carlson traces the idea that degeneracy was biologically determined and shows how the social application of the label changed throughout the last century as the new academic discipline of sociology emerged. Carlson describes the failures and abuses of the social movements in the United States and Europe with their sorry history of racism, anti-Semitism, and violations of basic human rights.
Carlson writes beautifully, but I want to warn readers that this is not a book to be looked at lightly. It probably couldn't have the power it does if it did not include the wealth of illustrations and extensive notes, but it is indeed a serious study of this disturbing science. As Carlson writes in his Introduction, "Readers of this book may feel uncomfortable, as I certainly did, when they realize that there is a lot of mythology associated with the origins of the eugenics movement. It is embarrassing to see many strange bedfellows in the development of the idea of unfit people, and it should give us pause if we believe that the Holocaust could have been predicted from its earliest roots." I shivered when I read that statement. "--Charles Decker"


Author: Benno Muller-Hill
Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Release: 1997
Summary: Benno Muller-Hill's study examines two issues that demand the attention of anyone interested in science, history and society. The first is the story of how German scientists - pioneers in the study of genetics in the human population - lent their scientific prestege to the mind-numbing brutality of the Nazis. Their scholarly works on "Race-hygiene" with its thinly disguised anti-semitism produced first the sterilization of thousands of "undesirables" in the 1930s - under a guise of scientific acceptablility and then escalated into the industrial scale murder that the world knows as the Holocaust.
A second major thread is how the scientific perpetrators - such as Verscher and his student - the more notorious Mengele - survived the war and in Verscher's case were continued to be honored by European scientific societies into the 1960. Not just Germans - but British, French Italians and Americans chose to turn a blind eye as they presented awards to the collaborator in Mengele's Auschwitz "twin-studies".
Benno Muller-Hill has uncovered the documentation of these whitewashed academics in the archives of the current German national research institutes. His discoveries and publications have been met with stoney silence, and the locking of archives and papers. His book may be the most through and well documented account that will be available for many years to come.
As he notes as we enter the age of the Human Genome we need to remember that scientific competentence is no protection from murderous immorality - that we should not hide or forget what has been done under the guise of "scientific reason" in past and that the most advanced science is no substitute for ethical and moral judgement in future.


Author: Mary Baker Eddy
Publisher: Writings of Mary Baker Eddy
Release: 1994
Summary: Some books can change your life. This is one of them! Every day people find practical, spiritual answers for health and healing, security, and lasting relationships in Science and Health -- a reference book for life!

Author: Carey Mcwilliams
Publisher: Gibbs Smith, Publisher
Release: 1980
Summary: Packed With Magnificent Material On Southern California's Galaxy of Person- Alities, This Book Provides Insights Into Subjects Ranging From The Origins Hollywood To The Flowering of Inter- National-Style Architecture. and It Does That By Looking At Personalities As Div- Erse As Helen Hunt Jackson To Aimee Semple McPherson, Huntington The Finan- Cier To Hatfield The Rainmaker.

Author: Arnold Ehret
Publisher: Benedict Lust Publications
Release: 1982
Summary: Although knew much of this, I came up with new ideas that reinforced my knowledge in overcoming constipation. I strongly believe that constipation is one of the major factos of many chronic diseases.So, read this book.

Author: Arnold Ehret
Publisher: Benedict Lust Publications
Release: 1971
Summary: What a simple, wonderful and true author. No marketing (low price), no pictures,no turning around the pot...just the truth, take it or leave it! The transition diet is easy to make when we follow the instructions.I felt this man speaks right from his heart, wanting to help people to live a wonderful life. I read many other books, and still come back to this one.

Author: Arnold Ehret
Publisher: Benedict Lust Publications
Release: 1976
Summary: The basic idea of avoiding certain foods that aren't good for the body is worthwhile. However, the book rambles in information that isn't that helpful. The key is eating more vegetables and fruits and avoiding mucus causing foods. An internet search may give you the quick information of this and you can skip this book. Also, books that deal with getting rid of inflamation in the body will be helpful. It is amazing how many diseases and ailments can be healed by changing what we eat... choose well for a healing fountain of youth!

Author: Emanuel Swedenborg
Publisher: Swedenborg Foundation
Release: 2001
Summary: Published in 1758, best-known of Swedenborg's works; describes the nature of life after death and of the internal state, or "ruling love," of the individual that determines his or her situation in the afterlife.

Author: Stephen Martin
Publisher: Shambhala
Release: 1991
Summary: For many years there have been accusations that the Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung was personally and professionally anti-Semitic. Lingering Shadows is a definitive sourcebook on this thorny subject. Included are papers from a groundbreaking conference co-sponsored by the C.G. Jung Foundation and held in New York City in 1989, papers from a workshop on Jung and anti-Semitism from the Eleventh International Congress for Analytical Psychology in Paris in 1989 and previously published articles of significance. The scope of the anthology ranges from essays with a historical perspective to those focusing more on a psychological analysis of the events, motivations, and dynamics of Jungian thought in relationship to anti-Semetism and National Socialism. What is revealed in this wide-ranging survey is how complex this relationship is, and how too many have passed judgment, either defensively or offensively, without sufficient information. Lingering Shadows provides straightforward facts and considered scholarly opinion that willl clarify this rumor-plagued area of depth psychology. The book also includes a bibliographic essay covering important publications on the topic and a survey of significant events and relevant quotations from Jung, Freud, and others.
--- from book's dustjacket


Author: Edward Edinger
Publisher: Shambhala
Release: 1992
Summary: This book is about the individual's journey to psychological wholeness, known in analytical psychology as the process of individuation. Edward Edinger traces the stages in this process and relates them to the search for meaning through encounters with symbolism in religion, myth, dreams, and art. For contemporary men and women, Edinger believes, the encounter with the self is equivalent to the discovery of God. The result of the dialogue between the ego and the archetypal image of God is an experience that dramatically changes the individual's worldview and makes possible a new and more meaningful way of life.

Author: Chogyam Trungpa
Publisher: Shambhala
Release: 1988
Summary: In this practical guide to enlightened living, Chögyam Trungpa offers an inspiring vision for our time, based on the figure of the sacred warrior. In ancient times, the warrior learned to master the challenges of life, both on and off the battlefield. He acquired a sense of personal freedom and power—not through violence or aggression, but through gentleness, courage, and self-knowledge. The Japanese samurai, the warrior-kings of Tibet, the knights of medieval Europe, and the warriors of the Native American tribes are a few examples of this universal tradition of wisdom. With this book the warrior's path is opened to contemporary men and women in search of self-mastery and greater fulfillment. Interpreting the warrior's journey in modern terms, Trungpa discusses such skills as synchronizing mind and body, overcoming habitual behaviors, relaxing within discipline, facing the world with openness and fearlessness, and finding the sacred dimension of everyday life. Above all, Trungpa shows that in discovering the basic goodness or human life, the warrior learns to radiate that goodness out into the world for the peace and sanity of others. The Shambhala teachings—named for a legendary Himalayan kingdom where prosperity and happiness reign—thus point to the potential for enlightened conduct that exists within every human being. "The basic wisdom of Shambhala," Trungpa writes, "is that in this world, as it is, we can find a good and meaningful human life that will also serve others. That is our true richness."

Author: James Webb
Publisher: Open Court Pub Co
Release: 1976
Summary: James Webb provides a fine look into the world of the irrational in this book. The book includes everything from Nazis and the occult, to Jungian psychiatry, to the counterculture of the Sixties. Wherever man exists, there will be a need to imagine a better world, and it is this ability of imagination that allows him to construct the occult fantasy. In this book Webb traces these circles as they have developed throughout history.

Author: Paul Carus
Publisher: Open Court Publishing Company
Release: 1982
Summary: Officially introduced in Buddhist schools and temples. A classic in its field. Beautifully illustrated.

Author: Scott Cunningham
Publisher: Llewellyn Publications
Release: 2002
Summary: "Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner" is the essential primer from one of the best known authors on Wicca. Focusing on the importance of individualism in your spiritual path, Cunningham explains the very basics of Sabbats (holy days), ceremonies, altars, and other nuts and bolts of Wicca that a solitary practitioner may have trouble finding elsewhere. While "Wicca" shouldn't be your sole point of reference when considering Wicca as your way of life, it is one of the best starting points. "--Brian Patterson"

Author: Ervin Seale
Publisher: DeVorss & Company
Release: 1997
Summary:

Author: Emma Curtis Hopkins
Publisher: DeVorss & Company
Release: 1974
Summary: Mrs. Hopkins was a dedicated teacher and healer whose students included Ernest Holmes - founder of Science of Mind/Religious Science Movement, Charles and Myrtle Fillmore - founders of Unity School of Christianity, and the founders of: Divine Science, the Emmanuel Movement, Christ Truth League and Home of Truth. This, her masterpiece, is one of the greatest of all works based on mysticism. "When the Lord is your confidence you will never find yourself at all deceived by the ways and speech of men and women, though they be very brilliant, if they speak outside of the Principle that demonstrates healing and goodness and life." (86)

Author: Emma Curtis Hopkins
Publisher: DeVorss & Company
Release: 1974
Summary: One of the most influential books of my writing and ministerial career. This book must be read, not with the mind, but with the soul, a feature that may prove difficult for some. Mrs. Hopkins fans the embers of the spiritually awakening consciousness in a way that is rare among writers. All her works should prove to be of great interest to the seeker of a deeper reality, but High Mysticism has the uncanny ability to impart a degree of that lofty realm Hopkins so eloquently elucidates.
Rev. J. Douglas Bottorff...


Author: Amit Goswami
Publisher: Tarcher
Release: 1995
Summary: The discovery of quantum physics as a science began a century ago and yet is still held at arms length by the majority of scientists despite the fact that many of the concepts are now utilized in modern technology.

The reasons for this are that quantum physics is viewed from the mind set of classical physics, otherwise termed material realism.

In this fascinating and broad minded book, Amit Goswami discusses the world view of material realism. He then provides a beautifully clear explanation of the main points and implications of quantum physics and the nature of reality. He states that consciousness and not matter is primary and describes his new paradigm of monistic idealism.

The old paradigm of material realism claims that reality is outside of us and is governed by the laws of classical physics. It sees objects as solid and independent from or how we observe them. This is a universal view of causality and determinism where humans are essentially mechanistic, emotionally driven carbon units. Life is predestined and free will is an illusion with consciousness merely a phenomenon of matter.
The science of this world relies on empirical evidence gathered by strong objectivity and meaning is derived through reductionist techniques. From this stance there is no real consideration of the perception of the observer determining the reality they experience.

Quantum physics has essentially demolished material realism through overwhelming evidence. However, Amit Goswami asks "why does it not speak for itself?" The problem is that quantum physics is observed and interpreted from the small window of classical physics and that is why it appears to be paradoxical and strange. There is a huge urge to make it fit the predictability of classical physics.

Fully embracing quantum physics means that we accept that the observer affects that which is observed. This also implies accepting that everything exists as superpositions of waves of probabilities until observed, that the universe is non local and that we are not separate from our environment.

Amit Goswami also reflects on the current non-compatibility of science and spirituality and suggests that accepting the full implications of quantum physics into our lives would dispense with the need to have such divisions and disparities.

To take these concepts further I'd recommend "A Beginner's Guide to Creating Personal Reality" by Ramtha.


Author: George Leonard
Publisher: Tarcher
Release: 2005
Summary: Two pioneers of the human potential movement offer this new edition of their classic work, updated for a new generation of readers.

George Leonard and Michael Murphy's groundbreaking human realization program has helped thousands of people harness their potential and capitalize on their ability for growth to enrich their lives. Through balanced and comprehensive long-term practice, we can transform our lives using Integral Transformative Practice, or ITP, a program developed by Murphy and Leonard and followed by thousands of people worldwide.

Drawing upon the authors' combined seventy years of experience in the study of human transformation, "The Life We Are Given" presents an extensive program for realizing the potential of body, mind, heart, and soul, both for individual actualization and community improvement. With inspiring true stories of the struggles and triumphs of ITP workshop students interwoven into the authors' detailed program, this important book provides a rich source of motivation and guidance for the seeker.

Perhaps even more relevant today than when it was published to great acclaim ten years ago, "The Life We Are Given" urges readers to begin that most important of human journeys: the journey toward a better, more fully realized self.


Author: Michael Murphy
Publisher: Tarcher
Release: 1993
Summary: I gave this book 5 stars because it is very extensive in its scope - it is not, however, the final word on this topic, there is more - I guess there is always more and there are always even more amazing stories. The book explores different phenomena, some rather rare and unusual, as in the following excerpt:
"Thurston quoted a sister Margherita Cortonesi:
"On one occasion, among others, when [Sister Veronica] being in a trance state was reciting her Office alternately with some invisible being, she was observed gradually to stretch out until the length of her throat seemed to be out of all proportion in such a way that she was altogether much taller than usual. We, noticing this strange occurrence, looked to see if she was raised from the ground, but this, so far as our eyes could tell, was not the case. So, to make sure, we took a yard-measure and measured her height, and afterwards when she had come to herself we measured her again, and she was at least a span (ten inches or more) shorter. This we have seen with our own eyes, all of us nuns who were in the chapel."
In 1629, a Donna Hortenzia Ghini stated under oath that:
"Sister Lisabetta Pancrazi, formerly a nun in the same convent, told me that on one occasion, seeing that the said Sister Veronica when in ecstasy seemed taller than in her normal state, took a yard-measure and measured her height, and that after the said Sister Veronica came to herself she measured her again with the said yard-measure, and she found that she was half an arm's length shorter."
Among other religious who allegedly exhibited elongation, the Capuchiness Abbess Costante Maria Castreca was said to have grown a considerable height from the ground during a religious ecstasy; the Venerable Domenica dal Paradiso grew taller in trance, according to her spiritual director and confidants. Because such phenomena were not thought to be marks of holiness, they were noted simply because they were unusual.
I include such phenomena in this discussion because they indicate the body's responsiveness to altered states of mind. When consciousness is released from some of its ordinary constraints, whether in ecstasies or dissociated states, ligaments and muscles are sometimes liberated too.:


Author: Martin Green
Publisher: Tufts University Press
Release: 1986
Summary:

Author: B. F. Skinner
Publisher: Hackett Publishing Company
Release: 2002
Summary: In this profound and profoundly controversial work, a landmark of 20th-century thought originally published in 1971, B. F. Skinner makes his definitive statement about humankind and society.
Insisting that the problems of the world today can be solved only by dealing much more effectively with human behavior, Skinner argues that our traditional concepts of freedom and dignity must be sharply revised. They have played an important historical role in our struggle against many kinds of tyranny, he acknowledges, but they are now responsible for the futile defense of a presumed free and autonomous individual; they are perpetuating our use of punishment and blocking the development of more effective cultural practices. Basing his arguments on the massive results of the experimental analysis of behavior he pioneered, Skinner rejects traditional explanations of behavior in terms of states of mind, feelings, and other mental attributes in favor of explanations to be sought in the interaction between genetic endowment and personal history. He argues that instead of promoting freedom and dignity as personal attributes, we should direct our attention to the physical and social environments in which people live. It is the environment rather than humankind itself that must be changed if the traditional goals of the struggle for freedom and dignity are to be reached.
Beyond Freedom and Dignity urges us to reexamine the ideals we have taken for granted and to consider the possibility of a radically behaviorist approach to human problems-one that has appeared to some incompatible with those ideals, but which envisions the building of a world in which humankind can attain its greatest possible achievements.


Author: Allen D. Kanner
Publisher: Sierra Club Books
Release: 1995
Summary: This pathfinding collection shows how the health of the planet is inextricably linked to the psychological health of humanity, individually and collectively. As such, it is sure to become a definitive work for the burgeoning ecopsychology movement, which is both a new beginning for environmentalism and a revolution in modern psychology. Collected here are writings from the premier psychotherapists, thinkers, and eco-activists working in the field, including:
James Hillman, world-renowned Jungian analyst, relating the "one core issue for all psychology" - the nature and limits of human identity - to the condition of the planet
Chellis Glendinning, author of My Name Is Chellis and I'm in Recovery from Western Civilization, alerting us to "the link between the psychological process of addiction and the technological system"
Carl Anthony, former president of Earth Island Institute, arguing for a "genuinely multicultural self and a global civil society without racism"
Ralph Metzner, president of the Green Earth Foundation and author of Maps of Consciousness, decrying our loss of "respect for the mysterious, and humility in relationship to the infinite complexities of the natural world"
Joanna Macy, writer, therapist, and Buddhist, noting that "we all need to unblock our feelings about our threatened planet" if we are to work through out "environmental despair"


Author: P. J. O'rourke
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic
Release: 1999
Summary: A conservative, prosperous, American journalist gadding around the world laughing at all the ways less successful nations screw up their economy--this might not sound like the recipe for a great read, unless you're Rush Limbaugh, but if that journalist is P.J. O'Rourke you can be sure that you'll enjoy the ride even if you don't agree with the politics. Although "Eat the Rich" is subtitled "A Treatise on Economics", O'Rourke spends relatively few pages tackling the complexities of monetary theory. He's much happier when flying from Sweden to Hong Kong to Tanzania to Moscow, gleefully recording every economic goof he can find. When he visits post-Communist Russia and finds a country that is as messed up by capitalism as it was by Communism, O'Rourke mixes jokes about black-market shoes with disturbing insights into a nation on the verge of collapse. P.J. O'Rourke is more than a humorist, he's an experienced international journalist with a lot of frequent-flyer miles, and this gives even his funniest riffs on the world's problems the ring of truth.

Author: Arthur De Gobineau
Publisher: Howard Fertig
Release: 1999
Summary: _The Inequality of the Human Races_ by Count Arthur de Gobineau is a prophetic work from the nineteenth century which shows the differences between the principle racial groups in terms of their civilizing influence. De Gobineau was a French aristocrat and racialist who had an influence on Richard Wagner and is believed to be a proto-Nazi theorist. Like Nietzsche, de Gobineau took a rather grim view of religion as a civilizing influence and argued against "slave-morality". This book expounds his racial theories. The book begins by making the case that racial differences can in fact explain differences in civilization and achievement. De Gobineau argues that neither luxury, effeminacy, misgovernment, fanaticism, nor the corruption of morals is responsible for the decline and destruction of states, civilizations, and peoples, but that instead the mixing of the blood leads to this decline. De Gobineau also argues in a series of successive chapters that racial inequalities are not the result of institutions, the regions in which one lives, or the civilizing influence of Christianity. He then proceeds to outline a series of comparisons between races and explains the differences between civilizations. De Gobineau argues that the white race is more capable of achieving great civilization than either the yellow or the black race, and he explains various intermixtures of these three races. The Aryan influence on high culture cannot be denied, and de Gobineau explains his theory of Aryan supremacy. For de Gobineau, there exist a male and female element within the blood. The male element constitutes a "material current" (Purusha), and the female element constitutes an "intellectual current" (Prakriti). De Gobineau then goes on to place different races into each of these two categories, placing the Chinese first among the male category and the Hindus first among the female category. De Gobineau also discusses differences between beauty and languages among the races. De Gobineau argues that the races are intellectually unequal and that different civilizations are mutually repulsive. De Gobineau ends this book with a recapitulation of the differences between black, yellow, and white races, noting the superiority of the white race and the Aryan family within that race. He also includes a section outlining the great civilizations and their achievements.

Author: George L. Mosse
Publisher: Howard Fertig
Release: 1999
Summary: I had to read Mosse's book for a graduate seminar on the Holocaust and found this to be absolutely fascinating. Not only does it show the progression of philosophies withing Germany from its roots in Romanticism to Volkish to what would ultimately become Nazi ideologies, but it presents the material in such a way that it becomes understandable exactly how this transition in thought could happen. Though the book is written as a scholarly history for scholars, it is fairly easy to understand, especially in the format in which it is presented. The first section focuses on the roots of Volkish thought and how they progressed from Romanticism in the late nineteenth century to Volkish in the early twentieth century which in turn lead to the Nazi ideals presented by Hitler to the German masses in the 1930s, a perversion of the Volkish. His second section examines how Volkish spread from small groups of idealists into the University system through literature and art, and through this infiltration of the Universities, as well as the German Youth Movement, expose its philosophies to a wider German audience than it had enjoyed before the first world war. The final section addresses Hitler's rise to power and the ways in which Hitler was able to manipulate Volkish and its intrinsic anti-Semitism to a radical degree to serve his purposes. Highly recommended for those interested in the Holocaust and/or Philosophy.

Author: Gary Taylor
Publisher: Ihs Press
Release: 2004
Summary: This history of the iconic early-20th-century journal "New Age" and its editor, A. R. Orage, presents an overview of the development of social thought during this period. Key thinkers including Hilaire Belloc, G. K. Chesterton, H. G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw were among the writers published in "New Age", as was Friedrich Nietzsche, in his first introduction to the British public. The political, social, and literary writing included in the journal also illustrates the personal tensions in Orage's life as he probed the nature of his own spiritual fulfillment by connecting it to national and social liberation.


Author: Anne Hooper, Jeremy Holford, Kathryn Hyatt
Publisher: Writers & Readers Publishing
Release: 1998
Summary: I found this book to be a very simple adaptation of Adler's counseling theory. It was a brief , general overview of an otherwise complex theory. While reading the book, however, I found it difficult to overlook the obvious errors in spelling and grammer that were prevalent throughout.

Author: David Loy
Publisher: Wisdom Publications
Release: 2003
Summary: The cross-fertilization between Buddhist teachings and Western social analysis results in a Buddhist social theory that illuminates the relationship between them.

Author: Thierry Dodin, Heinz Rather
Publisher: Wisdom Publications
Release: 2001
Summary: In the past century, the Western view of Tibet has evolved from an exotic Shangri-la filled with golden idols and the promise of immortality, to a peaceful land with an enlightened society now ravaged by outside aggression. How and why did our perception change? How accurate are our modern conceptions of Tibet? Imagining Tibet is a collection of essays that reveal these Western conceptions.

Author: Richard Cooper
Publisher: Knockabout Comics
Release: 1994
Summary:

Author: Dan Stone
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
Release: 2002
Summary: Before the First World War there existed an intellectual turmoil in Britain as great as any in Germany, France or Russia, as the debates over Nietzsche and eugenics in the context of early modernism reveal. With the rise of fascism after 1918, these debates became more ideologically driven, with science and vitalist philosophy being hailed in some quarters as saviors from bourgeois decadence, vituperated in others as heralding the onset of barbarism. "Breeding Superman" looks at several of the leading Nietzscheans and eugenicists, and challenges the long-cherished belief that British intellectuals were fundamentally uninterested in race. The result is a study of radical ideas which are conventionally written out of histories of the politics and culture of the period.

Author: Mortimer J. Adler
Publisher: Encyclopedia Britannica Corporation
Release: 1994
Summary: Information... Knowledge... Understanding... Wisdom...
From the ancient classics to the masterpieces of the 20th century, the Great Books are all the introduction you`ll ever need to the ideas, stories and discoveries that have shaped modern civilization. This collection of 517 classics in 60 beautifully bound volumes is color-coded into four subject categories: literature, history, philosophy, and science. And since this edition includes works from 20th century authors, it`s the most up-to-date collection of the Great Books ever.
Product Details
Reading and understanding great works by history`s outstanding minds has always been considered the substance of a liberal education. The Great Books of the Western World has been acclaimed as the greatest publishing venture of the 20th Century. The set now consists of 60 volumes, with 517 works by 130 authors spanning 30 centuries, on a total of 37,000 pages containing 29 million words. Among the Great Books` 130 authors, 47 are writers of imaginative literature; 29 are masters of mathematics and/or the natural sciences; 28 are historians or social scientists, and 28 or more are philosophers and/or theologians. (This totals 132 because William James and Alfred North Whitehead have made contributions in both of the latter two subject categories).
Volume Details
Volumes 1 and 2 of this collection is the Syntopicon, a unique two-volume guide (not sold separately) that enables you to investigate a particular idea and compare what different authors have to say about it. The Syntopicon comprises a new kind of reference work -- accomplishing for ideas what the dictionary accomplishes for words and the encyclopaedia accomplishes for facts. Also included is the Great Conversation, featuring fascinating background information, extensive timelines, photos, and quotes from the classic works and their authors.
Special colors on the Great Books` spines guide you quickly to the four subject areas - GREEN: Novels, Short Stories, Plays, and Poetry
Volume 3 Homer
Volume 4 Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripedes, Aristophanes
Volume 12 Virgil
Volume 19 Dante, Chaucer
Volume 22 Rabelais
Volume 24 Shakespeare l
Volume 25 Shakespeare ll
Volume 27 Cervantes
Volume 29 Milton
Volume 31 Molière, Racine
Volume 34 Swift, Voltaire, Diderot
Volume 45 Goethe, Balzac
Volume 46 Austen, George Eliot
Volume 47 Dickens
Volume 48 Melville, Twain
Volume 51 Tolstoy
Volume 52 Dostoevsky, Ibsen
Volume 59 Henry James, Shaw, Conrad, Chekhov, Pirandello, Proust, Cather, Mann, Joyce
Volume 60 Woolf, Kafka, Lawrence, T.S. Eliot, O`Neill, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Brecht, Hemingway, Orwell, Beckett RED: Philosophy and Religion
Volume 6 Plato
Volume 7 Aristotle l
Volume 8 Aristotle ll
Volume 11 Lucretius, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, Plotinus
Volume 16 Augustine
Volume 17 Aquinas l
Volume 18 Aquinas ll
Volume 20 Calvin
Volume 28 Bacon, Descartes, Spinoza
Volume 30 Pascal
Volume 33 Locke, Berkeley, Hume
Volume 39 Kant
Volume 43 Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche
Volume 55 William James, Bergson, Dewey, Whitehead, Russell, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Barth BLUE: History, Politics, Economics, and Ethics
Volume 5 Herodotus, Thucydides
Volume 13 Plutarch
Volume 14 Tacitus
Volume 21 Machiavelli, Hobbes
Volume 23 Erasmus, Montaigne
Volume 35 Montesquieu, Rousseau
Volume 36 Adam Smith
Volume 37 Gibbon l
Volume 38 Gibbon ll
Volume 40 J. S. Mill
Volume 41 Boswell
Volume 44 Tocqueville
Volume 50 Marx, Engels
Volume 57 Veblen, Tawney, Keyne


Author: Donald A. Mackenzie
Publisher: Edinburgh Univ Pr
Release: 1981
Summary: Although MacKenzie writes as a sociologist of science, his evaluation of the work of Francis Galton, Karl Pearson and R.A. Fisher provides an excellent summary of their contributions to the development of mathematical statistics as we know it today. His sociological thesis is that the primary concepts of statistics were "invented", not "discovered", and that the social position of these men strongly influenced the content of their works. While this not a radical position today (at least in sociological circles) it was, in 1987, relatively unfamiliar to many statisticians.

All three of the major figures studied were connected to the eugenics movement, and MacKenzie examines the relationship of eugenics and biometry to their work in mathematical statistics. He shows how Fisher's Genetical Theory of Natural Selection evidences the eugenics goals which are usually associated with Pearson. While it is a bit trickier to connect his books on Scientific Inference and Statistical Methods to eugenics, MacKenzie is quite convincing.


I regret not having read this book ten years ago, since it clarified several issues that I have been struggling with as a teacher of statistics. I looked it up as a result of a reference in an article by John Aldrich in the journal Statistical Science (Vol. 10, No. 4, 364-376) on Pearson and Yule's views of spurious correlation. Statistical Science, by the way, often contains interesting pieces on the history of statistics.


Author: Catherine Tumber, Catherine Tumber
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Release: 2002
Summary: Based largely on research in popular journals, self-help manuals, newspaper accounts, and archival collections, American Feminism and the Birth of New Age Spirituality demonstrates that the New Age movement first flourished more than a century ago during the Gilded Age under the mantle of 'New Thought'. Tumber pays close attention to the ways in which feminism became grafted, with varying degrees of success, to emergent forms of liberal culture in the late nineteenth century, and questions the value of the new age movement--then and now--to the pursuit of women's rights and democratic renewal. Visit our website for sample chapters!

Author: Frances Vaughan
Publisher: Quest Books
Release: 1995
Summary: A psychotherapist maps the pitfalls of the spiritual path.

Author: H. P. Blavatsky
Publisher: Quest Books
Release: 1993
Summary: Creation of the cosmos and the story of humanity and our evolution--a synthesis of religion, philosophy, and science. Three volumes with slip case, includes full index.

Author: Martin Brauen
Publisher: Weatherhill
Release: 2004
Summary: In this lively and visually engaging work on Western conceptions of Tibet, anthropologist Martin Brauen paints a vivid portrait of misinterpretation, trivialization, and political and commercial exploitation of a rich and ancient culture. Starting with romantic notions of 17th-century adventurers in search of a Himalayan Utopia, Brauen discusses misconceptions both amusing and disturbing, such as the distortions of 20th-century neo-Nazis. The author also details the cynical exploitation of Tibetan Buddhism—a fundamental objective of which is the elimination of human greed—to further Western commercial aims. Nor does Brauen absolve Tibetans themselves in the use of the more benign, even flattering, of these distorted images, as they strive to draw the world's attention to their own politically and socially tenuous situation. Here the author lists the traditionally tolerant nature of Buddhist beliefs, the tendency of Tibetans to submit without question to authority figures, and some inherent naiveté as contributing factors. The book concludes with a caution on the dangers that these misconceptions pose to a mature presentation of the great value that Tibetan culture holds for the world. The illustrations are a fascinating and diverse collection drawn from movies, comic books, and popular literature. Illustrations of the commercial packaging of Tibet, its spiritual icons and religious leaders, are vivid and at times even shocking, as they portray the promotion of products ranging from cars to cosmetics, T-shirts, ash trays, and even soft pornography. In a world in which the elimination of cultural misunderstanding may be the key to ending human strife, "Dreamworld Tibet "offers a thoughtful and timely contribution.

Author: Daizen Victoria, Brian Daizen Victoria
Publisher: Weatherhill
Release: 1998
Summary: "Zen at War" offers a penetrating look at the close relationship that existed between Zen Buddhism and Japanese militarism prior to World War II. Using the actual words of leading Japanese Zen masters and scholars, the author shows that Zen served as a powerful spiritual and ideological foundation for the fanatic and suicidal spirit displayed by the imperial Japanese military. At the same time, the author tells the dramatic and tragic stories of the handful of Buddhist organizations and individuals that dared to oppose Japan's march to war. He follows this history up to the recent apologies of several Zen sects for their support of the war, and the reemergence of what he calls corporate Zen in postwar Japan.

Author: James A. Herrick
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
Release: 2003
Summary: Herrick's work is a wonderful intellectual history tracking the general religious shift from what might be recognized as the Judeo-Christian tradition (what the author calls the Revealed Word tradition) to one marked by religious pluralism, pantheism, Gnosticism, and several other trends. He not only lays out the influential sources in this shift in a convincing and easy to understand manner, but he engages what he labels the New Religious Synthesis from the Revealed Word tradition.

Anyone who finds the current religious milieu in the Western world interesting, or anyone who would like a serious work on the current state of affairs in our religious culture would find this a thoroughly researched and well-argued book.


Author: Ronald Enroth
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
Release: 2005
Summary: Today's pluralistic society is filled with religious alternatives and options, and the choices for faith commitment have never been more numerous. Many of these new religious movements are growing at a far faster pace than most traditional Christian denominations. Why are they so appealing? Sociologist Ronald Enroth and a team of expert contributors provide an accessible handle on the key religious movements of our day, from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and the Jehovah's Witnesses to contemporary versions of Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam. They assess what each movement believes, why they are attractive to so many, and how Christians can respond with grace and truth.

Author: Mattias Gardell
Publisher: Duke University Press
Release: 2003
Summary: The prose, while difficult is not a real obstacle to this text. Primarily this book is not about paganism, Asatru, or those communities, rather it is about how the trappings of these things that have been co-opted by White Separatists in North America. The bulk of the text is used to establish the context of how this has come about. With so many Americans having no real knowledge of the White Separatist movement it is important for the author to explain the progression of Ariosophy and later Christian Identity into the realm of racists adopting Asatru trappings esp. those of the 'folkish' type.

By the last third, when Gardell really gets into the modern racist/pagan crossover the reader should understand that these are not your typical pagans. These are a group of ideologically inbred folk who are seeking to escape the faith they can not justify and replace it with something that better fits their ideals. Let's be honest, "Love those that hate you," is harder than hell to justify if you hate everyone not like you. So the adoption of a form of Asatru as, 'the religion of the Aryan people,' is easy to understand. The in had been around for a long time in the form of the racialist or more folkish Asatru and Odinians like Edred Thorsson.

For this I must say that I found the presentation of Edred Thorsson's position to be sympathetic. Gardell apparently just let Thorsson talk about his perspective, one that has been presented elsewhere by Edred, often in his own books, and quoted him. Thorsson has long held that individuals should honor the gods and goddesses of their own ancestors. This position, while having a certain ethnic-heritage logic is not one that lends itself to the principles of liberal tolerance that we so often hear from the pagan community. I found no attack on either Thorrson or racialist pagans to be present. Perhaps many of the reviewers who did might want to consider why they feel so strongly about an academic text that presents very little commentary until the conclusion where you may disagree with his analysis but frankly there is not much of that.

My favorite criticism that seems to be labeled at this book though is the clear Marxist/post-modernist biases so many seem to find here. Gardell starts with early American commentaries on race and how the perception of race has changed over the last two and a half centuries. From Ben Franklin referring to, "swarthy Swedes," and their inferiority to the white race (read WASP) to the modern madness of skin tone determining race he seems well-justified in the declaring of race a cultural construct. For the review by Prometheus all I have to say is that just over a century and a half ago the Irish were considered to be nothing more than, 'white-niggers,' by the English and less than dogs in the States when they fled an artificial, state-created famine. The Irish race was damn real then, but now they are just white. Get a grip. Gardell is just establishing that at its core the term racist really means anyone who believes in the validity of the theory of race at any level. They may not be bigots, but for this text they are racists. That is neither a Marxist nor a post-modernist position in itself; it is just demonstrable fact that bites into an ideology that is untenable. This makes it much like both Marxism and post-modernism.

This book is for everyone. It is a clear and cogent history of the theologies that have been used to justify racist theories. It should be used as a wake-up call to the Asatru community that one day some idiots are going to get some real media attention for some bombing or high-profile assassination and they will shape what the public believes Asatru to be. It is a PR nightmare that could be diffused if the Asatru community really got its act together and started not merely distancing itself from this kind of stupidity but was seen to castigate and berate the forms of racist Asatru that Gardell looks at.

By the last third, when Gardell really gets into the modern racist/pagan crossover the reader should understand that these are not your typical pagans. These are a group of ideologically inbred folk who are seeking to escape the faith they can not justify and replace it with something that better fits their ideals. Let's be honest, "Love those that hate you," is harder than hell to justify if you hate everyone not like you. So the adoption of a form of Asatru as, 'the religion of the Aryan people,' is easy to understand. The in had been around for a long time in the form of the racialist or more folkish Asatru and Odinians like Edred Thorsson.

For this I must say that I found the presentation of Edred Thorsson's position to be sympathetic. Gardell apparently just let Thorsson talk about his perspective, one that has been presented elsewhere by Edred, often in his own books, and quoted him. Thorsson has long held that individuals should honor the gods and goddesses of their own ancestors. This position, while having a certain ethnic-heritage logic is not one that lends itself to the principles of liberal tolerance that we so often hear from the pagan community. I found no attack on either Thorrson or racialist pagans to be present. Perhaps many of the reviewers who did might want to consider why they feel so strongly about an academic text that presents very little commentary until the conclusion where you may disagree with his analysis but frankly there is not much of that.

My favorite criticism that seems to be labeled at this book though is the clear Marxist/post-modernist biases so many seem to find here. Gardell starts with early American commentaries on race and how the perception of race has changed over the last two and a half centuries. From Ben Franklin referring to, "swarthy Swedes," and their inferiority to the white race (read WASP) to the modern madness of skin tone determining race he seems well-justified in the declaring of race a cultural construct. For the review by Prometheus all I have to say is that just over a century and a half ago the Irish were considered to be nothing more than, 'white-niggers,' by the English and less than dogs in the States when they fled an artificial, state-created famine. The Irish race was damn real then, but now they are just white. Get a grip. Gardell is just establishing that at its core the term racist really means anyone who believes in the validity of the theory of race at any level. They may not be bigots, but for this text they are racists. That is neither a Marxist nor a post-modernist position in itself; it is just demonstrable fact that bites into an ideology that is untenable. This makes it much like both Marxism and post-modernism.

This book is for everyone. It is a clear and cogent history of the theologies that have been used to justify racist theories. It should be used as a wake-up call to the Asatru community that one day some idiots are going to get some real media attention for some bombing or high-profile assassination and they will shape what the public believes Asatru to be. It is a PR nightmare that could be diffused if the Asatru community really got its act together and started not merely distancing itself from this kind of stupidity but was seen to castigate and berate the forms of racist Asatru that Gardell looks at.


Author: Jeffrey Sconce
Publisher: Duke University Press
Release: 2000
Summary: In Haunted Media Jeffrey Sconce examines American culture's persistent association of new electronic media—from the invention of the telegraph to the introduction of television and computers—with paranormal or spiritual phenomena. By offering a historical analysis of the relation between communication technologies, discourses of modernity, and metaphysical preoccupations, Sconce demonstrates how accounts of “electronic presence” have gradually changed over the decades from a fascination with the boundaries of space and time to a more generalized anxiety over the seeming sovereignty of technology.
Sconce focuses on five important cultural moments in the history of telecommunication from the mid-nineteenth century to the present: the advent of telegraphy; the arrival of wireless communication; radio's transformation into network broadcasting; the introduction of television; and contemporary debates over computers, cyberspace, and virtual reality. In the process of examining the trajectory of these technological innovations, he discusses topics such as the rise of spiritualism as a utopian response to the electronic powers presented by telegraphy and how radio, in the twentieth century, came to be regarded as a way of connecting to a more atomized vision of the afterlife. Sconce also considers how an early preoccupation with extraterrestrial radio communications tranformed during the network era into more unsettling fantasies of mediated annihilation, culminating with Orson Welles's legendary broadcast of War of the Worlds. Likewise, in his exploration of the early years! of television, Sconce describes how programs such as The Twilight Zone and The Outer Limits continued to feed the fantastical and increasingly paranoid public imagination of electronic media. Finally, Sconce discusses the rise of postmodern media criticism as yet another occult fiction of electronic presence, a mythology that continues to dominate contemporary debates over television, cyberspace, virtual reality, and the Internet.
As an engaging cultural history of telecommunications, Haunted Media will interest a wide range of readers including students and scholars of media, history, American studies, cultural studies, and literary and social theory.


Author: Edward Bulwer-Lytton
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
Release: 2005
Summary: Climbing through the recesses of a mine, an English man falls into a deep chasm and finds himself suddenly trapped in a subterranean world inhabited by an ancient race of advanced beings. From Jules Verne's Journey to the Center of the Earth to Chris Marker's La Jetee, subterranean worlds have been a source of both fascination and fear for the literary imagination and The Coming Race is no exception. An evolutionary fantasy first published in 1871, the story draws upon ideas of Darwinism to describe a near future world characterized by female dominance, physical perfection, and vast technological progress. The novel was extremely popular in its time and is now considered a seminal science fiction text by contemporary scholars. This Wesleyan edition includes scholarly notes and an introduction that places the work in an intellectual and literary context, and describes the author's interest in the occult.

Author: Norman O. Brown
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
Release: 1985
Summary: A shocking and extreme interpretation of the father of psychoanalysis.

Author: Abraham H Maslow
Publisher: Brooks/Cole Pub. Co
Release: 1973
Summary:

Author: Laurence A. Rickels
Publisher: University of Minnesota Press
Release: 2002
Summary: Psychoanalysis was a symptom of everything the Nazis reviled: an intellectual assault on Kultur largely perpetrated by Jews. It was also, as this remarkable revisionary work shows, an inescapable symptom of modernity, practiced, transformed, and perpetuated by and within the Nazi regime. A sweeping, magisterial work by one of the most incisive and interesting scholars of modern philosophy, theory, and culture, Nazi Psychoanalysis studies the breadth of this phenomenon in order to clarify and deepen our understanding not only of psychoanalysis but of the twentieth century itself.
Tracing the intersections of psychoanalysis and Nazism, Laurence A. Rickels discovers startling conjunctions and continuities in writers as diverse as Adler and Adorno, Kafka and Goethe, Lacan, H. Rider Haggard, and Heidegger, and in works as different as Der Golem, Civilization and Its Discontents, Frankenstein, Faust, and Brave New World. In a richly allusive style, he writes of psychoanalysis in multifarious incarnations, of the concept and actual history of "insurance," of propaganda in theory and practice, of psychological warfare, Walt Disney, and the Frankfurt School debates-a dizzying tour of the twentieth century that helps us see how the "corridor wars" that arise in the course of theoretical, clinical, social, political, and cultural attempts to describe the human psyche are related to the world wars of the century in an intimate and infinitely complicated manner.
Though some have used its appropriation by the Nazis to brand psychoanalysis with the political odium of fascism, Rickels instead finds an uncanny convergence-one that suggests far-reaching possibilities for both psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic criticism. His work, with its enormous intellectual and historical span, makes a persuasive argument that no element of modernity-not psychoanalysis any more than Marxism or deconstruction, cultural revolutions or technological advances-can be adequately understood without a thorough consideration of its Nazi component.
Laurence A. Rickels is professor of German and comparative literature at the University of California at Santa Barbara. His books include The Vampire Lectures (1999), The Case of California (2001), and the edited volume Acting Out in Groups (1999), all published by Minnesota.


Author: Gail M. Harley
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
Release: 2002
Summary: Emma Curtis Hopkins: Forgotten Founder of New Thought, by Dr. Gail M. Harley, is a major contribution to scholarship on New Religious Movements in America and especially the American New Thought movement. It is a must read for anyone interested in the New Thought Movement (Unity, Religious Science, Divine Science, Universal Foundation for Better Living, INTA, and other related groups). Harley's style is clear and straight-forward yet scholarly in its depth and precision of analysis and explication. Uncluttered with meaningless details and free of jargon, Harley's work on Hopkins is certainly accessible to average readers. Dr. Harley also tells the story of Hopkins' remarkable life in such a way that it comes alive for the reader. At times, Harley's biographical narrative reads like a good novel -- a real page turner. The new findings about Hopkins' work that Harley presents are destined to lead to reevaluations of the history of the New Thought movement -- infact, the book itself represents a major reevaluation of that history. To Dr. Harley's subtitle, this reader would add only: "forgotten no more" -- thanks to Dr. Harley.

Author: Scott Beekman
Publisher: Syracuse University Press
Release: 2005
Summary: The first full-length biography of William Dudley Pelley, an important figure in the development of right-wing extremism in the United States called by detractors the "Star-Spangled Fascist."
William Dudley Pelley was one of the most important figures of the anti-Semitic radical right in the twentieth century. Best remembered as the leader of the paramilitary "Silver Shirts," Pelley was also an award-winning short story writer, Hollywood screenwriter, and religious leader. During the Depression Pelley was a notorious presence in American politics; he ran for president on a platform calling for the ghettoization of American Jews and was a defendant in a headlinegrabbing sedition trial thanks to his unwavering support for Nazi Germany.
Scott Beekman offers not only a political but also an intellectual and literary biography of Pelley, greatly advancing our understanding of a figure often dismissed as a madman or charlatan. His belief system, composed of anti-Semitism, economic nostrums, racialism, neo-Theosophical channeling, and millenarian Christianity, anticipates the eclecticism of later cult personalities such as Shoko Asahara, leader of Aum Shinrikyo, and the British conspiracy theorist David Icke.
By charting the course of Pelley's career, Beekman does an admirable job of placing Pelley within the history of both the anti-Semitic right and American occult movements. This exhaustively researched book is a welcome addition to the growing body of scholarship on American extremism and esoteric religions.


Author: Kenan Malik
Publisher: New York University Press
Release: 1996
Summary: Written with a breadth of knowledge, Malik doesn't disdain evidence taken from popular culture, but his work is replete with academic learning too. His thesis is challenging and well argued, and the book has the rare merit of proposing a view that sets the reader thinking on their own, and not just about race but all forms of socially constructed reality. First class.

Author: Kenan Malik
Publisher: New York University Press
Release: 1996
Summary: Written with a breadth of knowledge, Malik doesn't disdain evidence taken from popular culture, but his work is replete with academic learning too. His thesis is challenging and well argued, and the book has the rare merit of proposing a view that sets the reader thinking on their own, and not just about race but all forms of socially constructed reality. First class.

Author: Mike Hill
Publisher: New York University Press
Release: 1997
Summary:

Author: Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke
Publisher: New York University Press
Release: 2003
Summary: "[An] important work"
—"Philadelphia Inquirer"
"Presents a troubling picture of the mindset of the modern Far Right."
—"Library Journal"
"Anyone who remembers the devastation wrought by Nazi fanaticism can only be astonished and dismayed by this book. Who could have foreseen that half a century after the defeat of the Third Reich the Jews would once again be perceived as a demonic power intent on destroying the 'Aryan race', or that Hitler would be imagined as a divine being who is about to return to earth to complete the Holocaust? For the matter, who could have foreseen that the preposterous 'pagan' cult developed by Heinrich Himmler would ever be revived? Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke shows not only that these things have indeed happened but how and why they have happened. He also suggests what dangers they may portend. Black Sun is both an enthralling and a deeply disturbing work. It deserves the most serious attention—and a wide readership."
—Norman Cohn, author of "The Pursuit of the Millennium and Warrant for Genocide"
"Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke has done pioneering work in the field of the occult roots of Nazism. In the present volume he performs the same invaluable service with regard to the ideological fantasies of post war neo fascism."
—Walter Laqueur
More than half a century after the defeat of Nazism and fascism, the far right is again challenging the liberal order of Western democracies. Radical movements are feeding on anxiety about economic globalization, affirmative action, and third-world immigration, flashpoint issues to many traditional groups in multicultural societies. A curious mixture of Aristocratic paganism, anti-Semitic demonology, Eastern philosophies and the occult is influencing populist antigovernment sentiment and helping to exploit the widespread fear that invisible elites are shaping world events.
Black Sun examines the new neofascist ideology, showing how hate groups, militias and conspiracy cults attempt to gain influence. Based on interviews and extensive research into underground groups, Black Sun documents the new Nazi and fascist sects that have sprung up from the 1970s through the 1990s and examines the mentality and motivation of these far-right extremists. The result is a detailed, grounded portrait of the mythical and devotional aspects of Hitler cults among Aryan mystics, racist skinheads and Nazi satanists, Heavy Metal music fans, and in occult literature.
Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke offers a unique perspective on far right neo-Nazism viewing it as a new form of Western religious heresy. He paints a frightening picture of a religion with its own relics, rituals, prophecies and an international sectarian following that could, under the proper conditions, gain political power and attempt to realize its dangerous millenarian fantasies.


Author: Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke
Publisher: New York University Press
Release: 2000
Summary: "[A] superb study. . . . Goodrick-Clarke has done a service to sanity, even if the gullible will go on swallowing [Devi's] recycled poison rather than his antidote."
"--Times Literary Supplement"
"An excellent, thought-provoking volume. . . . We may readily accept that Devi was a revolting creature. But it is as well that we realise that such demons in human form existed and still do exist."
"--Independent"
"An admirably cool-headed history of an inflammatory subject. . . . It is likely to stand as the definitive study of a subject that a lesser author would have exploited for maximum sensationalism."
"--Gnosis"
"An engrossing, disturbing, and important book. Well-researched and evocatively told, the strange story of Savitri Devi is a mirror of the twentieth century's dark undercurrents and deserves to be widely read and pondered."
"--Robert S. Ellwood, University of Southern California"
In this window onto the roots and evolution of international neo-Nazism, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke reveals the powerful impact of one of fascism's most creative minds.
Savitri Devi's influence on neo-Nazism and other hybrid strains of mystical fascism has been continuos since the mid-1960s. A Frenchwoman of Greek-English birth, Devi became an admirer of German National Socialism in the late 1920s. Deeply impressed by its racial heritage and caste-system, she emigrated to India, where she developed her racial ideology, in the early 1930s. Her works have been reissued and distributed through various neo-Nazi networks and she has been lionized as a foremother of Nazi ideology. Her appeal to neo-Nazi sects lies in the very eccentricity of her thought - combining Aryan supremacism and anti-Semitism with Hinduism, social Darwinisn, animal rights, and a fundamentally biocentric view of life - and has resulted in curious, yet potent alliances in radical ideology.
As one of the earliest Holocaust deniers and the first to suggest that Adolf Hitler was an avatar-- a god come to earth in human form to restore the world to a golden age - Devi became a fixture in the shadowy neo-Nazi world. In Hitler's Priestess, Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke examines how someone with so little tangible connection to Nazi Germany became such a powerful advocate of Hitler's misanthropy.
Hitler's Priestess illuminates the life of a woman who achieved the status of a prophetess for her penchant for redirecting authentic religious energies in the service of regenerate fascism.


Author: Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke
Publisher: New York University Press
Release: 1993
Summary: This is a great book on the history of the movement. A lot of good info about Aryan Paganism in Germany at the start of the 1900s. I've known people who were involved with German Wotanism between the 1920s to 1945 and have books of and about that time period, but Mr. Goodricke-Clarke talks about alot of people I've never heard of before, and he gives new details about people I've read a great deal about. This book is the only source for a lot of this info.
His new book Black Sun is like part II of The Occult Roots of Nazism. He talks about the Pagan Revival after WWII and all the new ideas and people in the movement. These two books should be read together.


Author: W. Michael Ashcraft
Publisher: New York University Press
Release: 2005
Summary: "New religious movements have been in the public eye for decades, and have been the focus of a great deal of debate. Now, at long last, they get to speak for themselves. Dereck Daschke and W. Michael Ashcraft have given us an outstanding resource for understanding new religions, one useful to scholars and students as well as the inquisitive general public. The selections are excellent, and the introductions are models of clarity and accuracy. this volume of primary materials is overdue and very welcome." --Timothy Miller, University of Kansas
New Religious Movements is a highly unique volume, bringing together primary documents conveying the words and ideas of a wide array of new religious movements (NRMs), and offering a first-hand look into their belief systems.
Arranged by the editors according to a new typology, the text allows readers to consider NRMS along five interrelated pathways--from those that offer new perceptions of existence or new personal identities, to those that center on relationships within family-like units, to those movements that highlight the need for recasting the social order or anticipate the dawn of a new age.
The volume includes original documents from groups such as the Unification Church, Theosophy, Branch Davidians, Wicca, Jehovah's Witnesses, Santeria, and Seventh Day Adventists, as well as many others. Each section is prefaced by a contextual introduction and concludes with a list of sources for further reading. New Religious Movements offers a rare inside look into the worldviews of alternative religious traditions.


Author: Celia Rabinovitch
Publisher: Westview Press
Release: 2002
Summary: A vital new interpretation of the personalities, historical forces and intellectual paradigms that created Surrealist art.
From archaic fetishism, found objects, dream images and free association, Surrealist artists and writers - such as Giorgio de Chirico, Max Ernst, Salvador Dali, Meret Oppenheim and Wolfgang Paalen - transformed the ordinary into the extraordinary by deliberately evoking the ambivalence of sacred power. "Surrealism and the Sacred" traces the conflict between the secular and sacred forces from prehistory and paganism through the Renaissance and the occult revival of the 19th century to the Surrealist movement of the 20th century. Against the tyranny of reason and the European bourgeoisie, Surrealists drew from occultism, Asian religions and mysticism, and psychoanalysis to create an uncanny and creative state of mind that continues to have a profound effect on the modern imagination. This remarkable book challenges conventional assumptions about modern art and its larger meanings in the history of knowledge.


Author: Lenard J. Cohen
Publisher: Westview Press
Release: 2002
Summary: A riveting look into the life, personality, and policies of Serbia's president, Slobodan Milosevic. The violent disintegration of the former Yugoslavia highlights the importance of a detailed understanding of the Balkan region. The political outlook and behavior of the Serbs and Serbian elites has been particularly bewildering to Western citizens and decision-makers. "Serpent in the Bosom" provides an analysis of Serbian politics from 1987 to 2002 that centers on an examination of Slobodan Milosevic's rise to power, his pattern of rule, the war in Kosovo, and the recent democratic "revolution" in Serbia. Lenard Cohen examines Milosevic's shrewd admixture of Serbian nationalism and socialism and his utilization of the media, and other agencies, as part of his "technology of rule." He explores Milosevic's complex relationship with Serbia's intelligentsia, the Orthodox church, the police, and the army, as well as Serbian-Albanian relations and the Belgrade regime's ongoing controversy with Montenegro's political leadership. What emerges is a clearer understanding of Serbia's enigmatic leader, his influence on the Balkans, and the process of political transition in Yugoslavia.
This revised and updated edition includes material on Milosevic's indictment before the International Tribunal at Hague and an analysis of Yugoslav political developments since 00/12.


Author: Ralph Waldo Emerson
Publisher: Modern Library
Release: 2004
Summary: Introduction by Brenda Wineapple

In 1845 Ralph Waldo Emerson began a series of lectures and writings in which he limned six figures who embodied the principles and aspirations of a still-young American republic. Emerson offers timeless meditations on the value of individual greatness, reconnecting readers with the everyday virtues of his “Representative Men”: Plato, in whose writings are contained “the culture of nations”; Emanuel Swedenborg, a “rich discoverer” who strove to unite the scientific and spiritual planes; Michel de Montaigne, “the frankest and honestest of all writers”; William Shakespeare, who “wrote the text of modern life”; Napoleon Bonaparte, who had the “virtues and vices” of common men writ large; and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, who “in conversation, in calamity…finds new materials.”

This Modern Library Paperback Classic reflects the author’s corrections for an 1876 reprinting.


Author: Paul Carus
Publisher: Open Court Publishing Company
Release: 2004
Summary: The Gospel of Buddha, the classic text on Buddhism that first introduced many Westerners to Buddha and his teachings, was first published in 1894 and immediately became a worldwide bestseller. Author Paul Carus (1852-1919) collected many accounts of Buddha's life, teachings, and death, and fashioned a coherent and gripping narrative. It was easily understood and popular with Americans because it resembled a Christian "gospel." Martin Verhoeven's detailed introduction describes the circumstances surrounding Carus's achievement, and the book's relation to other strands of Buddhist teaching. This edition also includes 25 newly rediscovered paintings by the renowned Buddhist artist Yamada.

Author: James Webb
Publisher: Open Court Publishing Company
Release: 1988
Summary: _The Occult Underground_ by James Webb is a fascinating account of the various underground occult movements and individuals which sprang up at the end of the nineteenth century and represented a "flight from reason". Webb explains how developments in science and rationalist thought along with a decline in traditional religious belief had left many feeling bereft. It was out of this circumstance that occult movements grew and flourished. This book thoroughly discusses various occult individuals who played a prominent role in the shaping of esoteric thought during this period.

Webb begins by discussing the various movements which arose out of spiritualism. Spiritualism which made the claim to be able to communicate with the deceased had a fascinating prehistory beginning with mesmerism (of Franz Anton Mesmer), magnetism, and the teachings of the Swedish mystic Swedenborg. Spiritualism developed in America to include such figures as the Fox sisters, who notoriously engaged in spirit rappings and other activities supposedly making contact with discarnate spirits, and Andrew Jackson Davis, an early mesmerist. An important influence on spiritualist circles is the Society for Psychical Research, developed to emphasis a scientific approach to supernatural phenomenon. Following the discussion of spiritualism, Webb turns his attention to the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 at Chicago, a World's Fair featuring representatives from the world's great religious traditions. This encounter between the various traditions gave the West a unique opportunity to imbibe the teachings and traditions of the East. Webb notes how Chinese participants viewed this as an opportunity for "self-strengthening" of their beliefs and traditions, while Japanese participants sought to reassert national independence. Webb also notes the presence of Indian participants, particularly the Swami Vivekenanda who played an important role bringing the Advaita Vedanta to the West. Webb also distinguishes these religious traditions from Christianity, which sought to proclaim its unique spiritual truth above other religions. Webb also turns his attention to various further developments within the world of religion, including the creation of the Baha'i faith, Mormonism, and Christian Science. Next, Webb turns his attention to the Theosophical Society of Madame Blavatsky. Webb explains the mysterious career of Blavatsky as well as mentioning the roles of others including Annie Bessant and Charles Leadbeater and the role of Krishnamurthi as a coming messiah (the Maitreya or "world teacher"). Webb next turns his attention to various apocalyptic movements that developed within Protestant Christianity as well as the Roman Catholic reaction, emphasizing papal infallibility and devotion to Mary. Webb also explains the problematic relationship between Roman Catholicism and freemasonry in particular. Webb also discusses various developments out of Anglo-Catholicism and Roman Catholicism in which individuals sought a return to tradition often at the fringes of their churches. Webb subsequently traces out the development of occultism in the Bohemia of nineteenth century Paris. He notes the occult practices of such individuals as Josephin Peladin (heavily influenced by the Catholic reaction as well as the Cabbala and Rosicrucianism), Stanislas de Guita, Saint-Yves d'Alveydre, and various decadent writers, poets, and artists including Baudelaire and Huysmans. Webb next devotes a substantial discussion to the history of the secret tradition, emphasizing its roots in primitive mystery cults, early Christianity, Greek philosophy including Plato and Aristotle, neo-Platonism, Gnosticism, medieval heresy and witchcraft, and culminating in the achievements of such Renaissance thinkers as Ficino. Webb also shows the conflict that arose between the underground and the establishment as well as the role of the druids and other primitive secret societies in the formation of the occult tradition. Webb next turns his attention to various figures in the occult revival including especially the emphasis on Poland and Polish Messianism. Such figures as the Polish national poet Adam Mickiewicz, his spiritual master Andrei Towianski, and the mathematician-philosopher Hoene-Wronski came to play an important role in the development of Polish occultism. Under the influence of the Cabbala and Jewish belief, Poles came to regard themselves as a specially chosen people and to regard Napoleon as an important savior figure. Other occultists thoroughly discussed by Webb include the Abbe Constant (who was later to write under the name Eliphas Levi), an esoteric Christian socialist who wrote on magic and the Cabbala, Papus, Fabre d'Olivet, and Saint-Yves d'Alveydre. Webb also discusses the role of the Artist as a self-proclaimed elect. Webb next turns his attention to the spiritual in politics, including discussion of various pretenders to the throne following the period of the French Revolution. Webb also discusses the role of the occult in politics within England including discussion of the Celtic revival with particular emphasis on Irish, Scottish, and Welsh nationalisms. In this discussion, Webb mentions particularly the poet and Irish nationalist W. B. Yeats, who wrote on the "Celtic Twilight", as well as the Scottish nationalist Lewis Spence, who wrote on Atlantis. Finally, Webb turns his attention to various utopian schemes which played an important role among occultists. In particular, the figures of Saint-Simon and Fourier, both of whom advocated spiritual utopias, play an important role in this discussion. For Webb, utopianism represents an attempt by the occultist to translate the transcendent into the material world.

This book offers an excellent study of various occult individuals and their philosophies which played an important role in the development of the late nineteenth century. It offers the reader a rare opportunity to glimpse into the world of these figures who challenged materialism and rationalism during their time.


Author: H. G. Wells
Publisher: Tor Classics
Release: 1996
Summary: A shipwreck in the South Seas, a palm-tree paradise where a mad doctor conducts vile experiments, animals that become human and then "beastly" in ways they never were before--it's the stuff of high adventure. It's also a parable about Darwinian theory, a social satire in the vein of Jonathan Swift ("Gulliver's Travels"), and a bloody tale of horror. Or, as H. G. Wells himself wrote about this story, ""The Island of Dr. Moreau" is an exercise in youthful blasphemy. Now and then, though I rarely admit it, the universe projects itself towards me in a hideous grimace. It grimaced that time, and I did my best to express my vision of the aimless torture in creation." This colorful tale by the author of "The Time Machine", "The Invisible Man", and "The War of the Worlds" lit a firestorm of controversy at the time of its publication in 1896.

Author: Kimberly J. Lau
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Release: 2000
Summary: This deals with a fascinating subject; unfortunately, the author claims an importance for her approach and analysis that simply can't be justified: she takes a few snippets from theorists of taste, commodification, and trans-cultural exchange, treats them as gospel rather than engaging critically with them, and applies them to material that (in her view) accedes so readily to the theories as to raise no challenging questions at all. Moreoever, the prose is the blue boiler-plate special: jargon-laden and warmed over, with no sense that writing must be digestable.

Author: Leon Poliakov
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Release: 2003
Summary:

Author: Leon Poliakov
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Release: 2003
Summary: I remember reading this book many years ago at the State University of Binghamton Harpur College Library, and being filled with sadness by it. So many of the cultural heroes of the Western world from Voltaire to Wagner were anti- Semitic, or had some anti- Semitic writings. Many such as Tolstoy Goethe Dickens balanced anti- semitism with very pro- Jewish remarks. True Nietzche stood against Wagner. But on the whole even into this century with Pound, Eliot, Celine, Heidegger there were ' great creators' who bore in their mind and soul resentment and hatred of the Jews.
Even with Shakespeare who according to Harold Bloom's wonderful exaggeration ' invented the human' there is the question of his true intent with Shylock. Does a Jew really have hands and eyes for Shakespeare?
I believe that this book should be far more widely read and known than it is. And it should be part of the legacy of all those Jews who have given their lives to Western culture.


Author: Leon Poliakov
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Release: 2003
Summary:

Author: Leon Poliakov
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Release: 2003
Summary: It is a shame that Poliakov is not better known in this country. The subject matter is far greater than the title suggests. This is really a kind of panoramic history of Europe in the style of Braudel, only much less densely written and pleasurable to read. The translation only improves matters. With all the poorly written material on this subject, it is a shame that Poliakov is not brought out in bigger editions. This is really something special, and it's bound to fascinate any reader of European or Jewish history. I would say it's an ideal gift to any reader of history. Anyway, great to have it back in print after all these years.

Author: Liz Constable
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Release: 1998
Summary:

Author: Allan Hunt
Publisher: Chronicle Books
Release: 2002
Summary: The use of psychedelic drugs is that dark little secret behind the popular origins of Eastern spirituality in America, but if they really open the mind in the same ways meditative experiences do, why shouldn't they be legitimated and brought out into the open? In Allan Hunt Badiner and Alex Grey's "Zig Zag Zen" authors, artists, priests, and scientists are brought together to discuss this question. Opinions fall on all sides. Ram Dass, for instance, discusses the benefits as well as the limitations. Rick Strassman outlines his work in the first federally funded psychedelic study in two-and-a-half decades. Rick Fields sets the historical scene. China Galland offers a wrenching personal experience. Robert Jesse introduces the varieties of entheogens, drugs that engender mystical states. Lama Surya Das tells of his early drug years. And a roundtable discussion with Ram Dass, Robert Aitken, Richard Baker, and Joan Halifax caps it all.
Interspersed throughout are stunning full-page, full-color images of spiritual art by the likes of Robert Beer, Bernard Maisner, and, of course, Alex Gray. A fascinating look at a complex topic, "Zig Zag Zen" is worth appreciating and pondering. "--Brian Bruya"


Author: Franz Kafka
Publisher: New Directions Publishing Corporation
Release: 2004
Summary: Michael Hofmann's superb new translation of Franz Kafka's epic work. Franz Kafka's "Amerika (The Man Who Disappeared)" at last has the translator it deserves. Michael Hofmann's startlingly visceral and immediate translation revives Kafka's great comedy, and captures a new Kafka, free from Prague and loose in the new world, a Kafka shot through with light in this highly charged and enormously nuanced translation.
Kafka began the first of his three novels in 1911, but like the others, "Amerika" remained unfinished, and perhaps, as Klaus Mann suggested, "necessarily endless." Karl Rossman, the youthful hero of the novel, "a poor boy of seventeen," has been banished by his parents to America, following a scandal. There, with unquenchable optimism, he throws himself into adventure after misadventure, and experiences multiply as he makes his way into the heart of the country, to The Great Nature Theater of Oklahoma.
In creating this new translation, Hofmann, as he explains in his introduction, returned to the manuscript version of the book, restoring matters of substance and detail. Fragments which have never before been presented in English are now reinstated - including the book's original "ending."


Author: Henry Miller
Publisher: New Directions Publishing Corporation
Release: 1970
Summary: In reading Henry Miller's surprisingly contemporary 'The Air-Conditioned Nightmare I experienced the same kind of desire to 'see' America as I did when reading Kerouac's 'On the Road', but for very different reasons.

While Kerouac's narrative was that of his experiences with people he encountered along his way while traversing the country, Miller seems most at ease in dozens of miles of empty desert highway, alone with his thoughts.

Miller, returning from many years of living abroad, decided to write about his experiences traveling across America, and what his native people were really like; what the country had become, since the ideas and ideals put forth by the founding fathers.

His scathing, relentless narrative berates the 'American Dream' and 'Way of Life'...and the pursuit of such. Americans are painted as greedy, self-indulgent, ignorant of history, bereft of morals, and devoid of honor and dignity.

But Miller also finds along the way things that he loves. A greater understanding of the workings of an automobile, a love of the land itself that he never had while living in America, and much more.

Juxtapositioned with his disdain for American culture and standards, it illustrates how Miller himself learned to separate the people from the place, and love America itself for it's most basic beauty and qualities; while bemoaning those who inhabited its soil.

An excellent read by a gifted narrator, The Air-Conditioned Nightmare is not a book for the very patriotic. While it might give such people cause to re-think their love of life here in the states, it also has the potential to offend.

Highly recommended, but only to like-minded readers.


Author: Stephanie Barron
Publisher: Harry N. Abrams
Release: 1991
Summary: When the National Socialists came to power in Germany in the early 1930s, one of their most vigorous campaigns was against modernist and avant-garde art. Some 650 works by such renowned artists as Max Beckmann, Marc Chagall, Otto Dix, Wassily Kandinsky, and Paul Klee were removed from German museums and assembled in a traveling exhibition that the Nazis called "Degenerate Art." Fifty years later, the L.A. County Museum of Art reconstructed the notorious exhibition. This catalogue not only recreates the original show, but contains exhaustively researched essays on such topics as the Nazi ideals of beauty and resistance efforts by some German museums. Biographical information is available for each persecuted artist as well as rare photographs, and there is a room by room survey of and guide to the 1939 exhibition with a new English translation. Artistic expression is still under attack by such groups as the NEA, making this book strikingly relevant today.

Author: Ted Anton
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
Release: 1996
Summary: Police have been stumped ever since popular University of Chicago Divinity Professor Ioan Culianu was killed in the middle of a workday in a campus bathroom. The 1991 murder has offered few profitable leads. Author Ted Anton suggests strongly that radicals from Culianu's native Romania did the deed. If he's right, then the death of Culianu probably marks the first political assassination of a professor on American soil. The bulk of this book focuses on the life, times, and scholarship of a man heralded by many to be his generation's Mircea Eliade--as well as why Romanian thugs would have any interest in such a person. The case's apparent unsolvability is maddening, but Anton does a fine job of recounting its essentials.

Author: Matthew Frye Jacobson
Publisher: Hill & Wang
Release: 2001
Summary: How a new American identity was forged by immigration and expansion a century ago.

In "Barbarian Virtues", Matthew Frye Jacobson offers a keenly argued and persuasive history of the close relationship between immigration and America's newly expansionist ambitions at the turn of the twentieth century. Jacobson draws upon political documents, novels, travelogues, academic treatises, and art as he recasts American political life. In so doing, he shows how today's attitudes about "Americanism" -- from Border Watch to the Gulf War -- were set in this crucial period, when the dynamics of industrialization rapidly accelerated the rate at which Americans were coming in contact with foreign peoples.


Author: Anders Stephanson
Publisher: Hill & Wang
Release: 1996
Summary: The Hill and Wang Critical Issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics.

Stephanson explores the origins of Manifest Destiny--the American idea of providential and historical chosenness--and shows how and why it has been invoked over the past three hundred years. He traces the roots of Manifest Destiny from the British settlement of North America and the rise of Puritanism through Woodrow Wilson's efforts to "make the world safe for democracy" and Ronald Reagan's struggle against the "evil empire" of the Soviet Union. The result is a remarkable and necessary book about how faith in divinely ordained expansionism has marked the course of American history.


Author: Johanna Schoen
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Release: 2005
Summary: In August 2003, North Carolina became the first U.S. state to offer restitution to victims of state-ordered sterilizations carried out by its eugenics program between 1929 and 1975. The decision was prompted by newspaper stories based on the research of Johanna Schoen, who was granted unique access to summaries of 7,500 case histories and the papers of the North Carolina Eugenics Board.
In this book, Schoen situates the state's reproductive politics in a national and global context. Widening her focus to include birth control, sterilization, and abortion policies across the nation, she demonstrates how each method for limiting unwanted pregnancies had the potential both to expand and to limit women's reproductive choices. Such programs overwhelmingly targeted poor and nonwhite populations, yet they also extended a measure of reproductive control to poor women that was previously out of reach.
On an international level, the United States has influenced reproductive health policies by, for example, tying foreign aid to the recipients' compliance with U.S. notions about family planning. The availability of U.S.-funded family planning aid has proved to be a double-edged sword, offering unprecedented opportunities to poor women while subjecting foreign patients to medical experimentation that would be considered unacceptable at home.
Drawing on the voices of health and science professionals, civic benefactors, and the women themselves, Schoen's study allows deeper understandings of the modern welfare state and the lives of American women.


Author: Conrad Cherry
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Release: 1998
Summary: The belief that America has been providentially chosen for a special destiny has deep roots in the country's past. As both a stimulus of creative American energy and a source of American self-righteousness, this notion has long served as a motivating national mythology.
"God's New Israel" is a collection of thirty-one readings that trace the theme of American destiny under God through major developments in U.S. history. First published in 1971 and now thoroughly updated to reflect contemporary events, it features the words of such prominent and diverse Americans as Jonathan Edwards, Thomas Jefferson, Brigham Young, Chief Seattle, Abraham Lincoln, Frances Willard, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Ralph Reed, and Rosemary Radford Ruether. Neither a history of American religious denominations nor a history of American theology, this book is instead an illuminating look at how religion has helped shape Americans' understanding of themselves as a people.


Author: Steven Selden
Publisher: Teachers College Press
Release: 1999
Summary: I recently picked up Selden's book in the local mall. I planned to only skim through it. However, I was left stunned with the introduction and had no choice but to purchase the book. In fact, I read the entire book in one nights time. Selden's story of Eugenics in America is amazing. He is a true scholar and story teller, a gleeman of the modern age. Highly recommend this book to students of all majors.

Author: Mary Daly
Publisher: Beacon Press
Release: 1998
Summary: Devotees of the visionary feminist philosopher Mary Daly will be delighted by this call to action against the "necrotechnologists" of genetic research and the advances of right-wing religious fundamentalism. In "Pure Lust" (1984), Daly posited the importance of four elements: words, substances, the cosmos, and spirits. "Quintessence," as she describes it, is the connecting fifth element, "the Source of our power to Realize a true Future." Tapping into Quintessence, she argues, can enable us to name and confront "the escalating atrocities ... against women and nature and [summon] Courage and Hope to transcend [them]." To soften her grim depiction of the present moment, Daly has cleverly presented this new book as its own 50th-anniversary edition (2048 in the "biophilic era"), appearing at a time when women have banded together and learned how to summon and direct their psychic energies. They have, in fact, saved the world. Each chapter concludes with comments by Annie, an ardent young woman of that period, who has invoked Mary Daly in order to ask her about the bad old days of the late 20th century, while Daly herself gasps with amazement at the clean water, fresh air, and sweet-smelling blossoms of the idyllic future. "--Regina Marler"

Author: Mary Daly
Publisher: Beacon Press
Release: 1990
Summary: "In this deeply original, provocative book, outrage, hilarity, grief, profanity, lyricism and moral daring join in bursting the accustomed bounds even of feminist discourse." -The New York Times Book Review

Author: Raymond Buckland
Publisher: Citadel Press
Release: 2004
Summary: I have read a few Wicca text's and I find it hard to finish the books due to depth of the information. This book I read with ease and had no problems finishing it. It is set out simple and isn't just one sided he discusses what other authors believe and don't believe. I found that this book really helped me carve my own path and directions of my own choice he just helps you find your own individual one. Great read and help.

Author: Anthony Paige
Publisher: Citadel Press
Release: 2002
Summary: As a freshman in college, I found this book to be a tremendous help. The Wicca 101 stuff aside, it helps to address serious issues, such as being in the broom closet, working rituals in dorm rooms (that can be quite a hassle), sexuality and Wicca, the campus coven and Pagan student union groups, and even drugs in their relation to the Craft (something few other books have discussed in depth). But my favorite part of this book is the fact that it's full of interviews from Pagans in college, and since I love firsthand experiences, I couldn't put it down. The resource guide and small section on rituals and spells is also a plus. Be you new to the Craft or veteran, this book is a real treat for the college Pagan.

Author: Richard Slotkin
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
Release: 2000
Summary: On the basis of his sweeping 1975 survey of American Colonial and early Republican literature, "Regeneration Through Violence: The Mythology of the American Frontier, 1600-1860", Richard Slotkin has approached the pop guru status of archetypal excavators such as Joseph Campbell, despite the fact that his work emphasizes the dark undercurrents of American culture. His argument in "Regeneration" is that, as the British colonists established their own societies in the wilderness, they expressed their regional desires for territorial expansion and self-rule by reinventing their history. Their narratives, according to Slotkin, revolved around frontiersmen who internalized, then disciplined, the "savagery" of their new environments, using their newfound mastery of nature to transform the wilderness into a revitalized civilization. Slotkin begins by examining how narratives of "King Philip's War" transformed New England from a demon-haunted Puritan enclave to a region where Indian killing represented progress and prosperity. Daniel Boone's paradoxical backwoods mixture of aggression and reflection serves as an icon for the rest of "Regeneration", which emphasizes sectional variations of the Indian hunter myth, while analyzing the more "serious" literary endeavors of Cooper, Hawthorne, Thoreau, and Melville.
"Regeneration" reads at times like a "noir"-ish variation on Frederick Jackson Turner's influential "The Frontier in American History", a vision in which genocide, white supremacy, and environmental exploitation are the real engines driving the nation's expansion. At a time when even the bloodiest of war films extols family values in the midst of combat, Slotkin's grim tour of the United States' collective cultural history demands a wide audience. "--John M. Anderson" END


Author: Richard Slotkin
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
Release: 1998
Summary: "Gunfighter Nation" concludes Richard Slotkin's three-volume study, which began in 1973 with the publication of "Regeneration Through Violence", of the significance of the frontier in the American imagination. Looking primarily at pulp novels and films, Slotkin takes a painstakingly thorough look at the relationship between imagery of the West in industrial mass culture and U.S. foreign policy during the 20th century. Specifically, he looks at how the previous century's "frontier aristocrat" served as the model diplomat for America's agenda of economic imperialism from the Spanish American War to the "police action" in Vietnam.
As the U.S. gained international stature, the archetype of the frontier aristocrat articulated the goals and ideals of the American populace. But Slotkin shows how, as time progressed, the increasing irrelevance of the frontier myth on foreign soil foiled the prowess of the U.S. war machine. At the book's conclusion, in which images of the My Lai Massacre are juxtaposed against the final shootout of Sam Peckinpah's "The Wild Bunch", the contradiction between faith and experience becomes painfully evident. "Gunfighter Nation" delivers the satisfaction of a historian with the acquired wisdom to address directly the issues that inspired his lifelong work. "--John M. Anderson"


Author: B. K. S. Iyengar
Publisher: Schocken
Release: 1995
Summary: The definitive guide to the philosophy and practice of Yoga--the ancient healing discipline for body and mind--by its greatest living teacher. Light on Yoga provides complete descriptions and illustrations of all the positions and breathing exercises. Features a foreword by Yehudi Menuhin. Illustrations throughout.

Author: Peter Washington
Publisher: Schocken
Release: 1996
Summary: Just before the turn of the century, a renegade Russian aristocrat named Madame Blavatsky came to America claiming that man was descended not from the ape but from spiritual beings. Thus began Theosophy, the very first "new age" religion. This thought-provoking and often hilarious study delineates the course of Theosophy and other sects which have come down through the years. Photos.

Author: Miguel Serrano
Publisher: Schocken Books
Release: 1966
Summary: Miguel Serrano, a Chilean diplomat and writer who has travelled widely in India studying Yoga, had a close friendship with Jung and Hesse at the end of their lives. This book is the outcome of his meetings and correspondence with them. Many letters are reproduced including documents of great importance written to the author by Jung shortly before his death, explaining his ideas about the nature of the world and of his work.

Author: Daniel Stashower, Sherlock Holmes
Publisher: Owl Books
Release: 2001
Summary: Despite (or because of) the tremendous success of his Sherlock Holmes stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle always tended to play down their value and importance in his life. Just before his death in 1930, he drew a memorable sketch of his life's work. Conan Doyle portrayed events from his life as a series of packing cases being loaded onto a wagon and pulled by a flea-bitten workhorse. Perhaps the heaviest case of all, notes Daniel Stashower in his fascinating biography "Teller of Tales", is the one that reads "Sherlock Holmes."
Stashower's intent is to show that Conan Doyle was "not" Sherlock Holmes, and that his life consisted of much more than the now ridiculed spiritualism to which he devoted much of his later years. He succeeds to a surprising degree, convincing us that "The White Company" and "Sir Nigel" (forgotten novels that Conan Doyle thought were his best) are indeed worth reading. As for the spiritualism, Stashower meticulously places his subject's long fascination with it into a compassionate and fully researched social context. We come away certain that Conan Doyle (along with many other worthy citizens of the period) really believed in it. "--Dick Adler"


Author: Chalmers Johnson
Publisher: Owl Books (NY)
Release: 2001
Summary: If the 20th century was the American century, the 21st century may be a time of reckoning for the United States. Chalmers Johnson, an authority on Japan and its economy, offers a troubling prognosis of what's to come. "Blowback"--the title refers to a CIA neologism describing the unintended consequences of American activity--is a call for the United States to rethink its position in the world. "The evidence is building up that in the decade following the end of the Cold War, the United States largely abandoned a reliance on diplomacy, economic aid, international law, and multilateral institutions in carrying out its foreign policies and resorted much of the time to bluster, military force, and financial manipulation," writes Johnson. "The world is not a safer place as a result." Individual chapters focus on Okinawa (where American servicemen were accused of raping a 12-year-old girl in "Asia's last colony"), the two Koreas, China, and Japan. The result is a liberal-leaning (and Asia-centric) call for the United States to disengage from many of its global commitments. Critics will call Johnson an isolationist, but friends (perhaps admirers of Patrick Buchanan's "A Republic, Not an Empire") will say he simply speaks good sense. All will agree he is an earnest voice: "I believe our very hubris ensures our undoing." "--John J. Miller"

Author: Talal Asad
Publisher: Stanford University Press
Release: 2003
Summary: Asad, an anthropologist, is one the most interesting minds working on the concept of secularity vis ý vis modernity and its tendentious universality. The entire work is loosely an examination of the secular as an epistemý and secularism as a political doctrine respectively as well as the interrelation between the two. Asking what an anthropology of secularism might look like, he avoids being bold and shuns an attempt to actually construct one. It's a concept that he's flirted with before in GENEALOGIES OF RELIGION, but any attempt to construct a magisterial theory are absent. As a work overall, the end result is a disjointed collection of previously published articles inter-mixed with new ones; however, it is worthy mentioning that even the previously published articles that reappear in this work we significantly revised from the original-at least the ones I was familiar with. Nevertheless, this doesn't detract from the collective value of the book. All the ideas he puts forward are cogent, probing, and provocative.
His leading contribution is in the area of how secular discourse is perceived from the periphery of the modernization process-a periphery that `doesn't fit' into the metanarrative of Amero-European modernity since the Enlightenment. Thus, the conluding essay on the transformation of law and social ethic in colonial Egypt is alone worth the price of admission. His treatments of human rights, agency and pain, cruelty and torture, and Muslims in Europe best demonstrate the feasibility of employing anthropology as a disciplinary lens through which to scrutinize modernity and its `essential' components [esp. secularism].
Asad crosses the barrier of viewing the secular simply as the mere `separation between church and state' and enters into territory where questions can be posited such as `what created the historical moment which made possible the thought of secularism?' As such, he rolls back the shiny veneer of modernity to unravel the threads of it inner fabric. Thus, he facilitates the process whereby we can shed facile questions like: "when will Muslim societies secularize?"-moving on to questions that inquire into the historical processes that formed the secular/human subject of normative modernity in Europe. Localizing European/Western experience in such a way, a more lucid account of the advent modern society, state, religion, etc. in its non-European manifestations becomes increasingly attainable.
Though rhetorically convincing, there are parts of the book that remain tendentious at best. In particular, this goes for his arguments for secularism origins lying in the modern cleavage between private morality and public law. Systematic delineation of the two spheres is actually quite old whether one refers to the Christian or Islamic tradition-just to mention a few examples, one could take the ETYMOLOGIES of Isidore of Seville or the various Muslim jurists extrapolations of the principle of "al-amr bi'l-ma'ruf wa-l-nahy `an al-munkar" (i.e., commanding the good and forbidding the wrong). Hopefully, fuller elucidation will more fully distinguish these pre-modern conceptualizations from their distinctly modern (and secular?) configurations.


Author: Max Nordau
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
Release: 1993
Summary: "Degeneration is one of the most important documents of the fin de siècle, the years between the 1880s and 1900 when the robust views of the nineteenth century clashed with the heightened sensibilities of a searching and disillusioned generation. . . . [It] is a mirror of conflicting attitudes which are, in fact, contemporary with our present cultural dilemmas. But culture itself always reflects the state of society. Max Nordau presents us with a searchlight whose beams reflect the kind of world [we] have made for [ourselves.]"-George L. Mosse in his introduction to the 1968 edition. Max Nordau was a famous writer, a practicing physician, a bourgeois examplar of enterprise and energy when his Degeneration appeared in Germany in 1892. He argued that the spirit of the times was characterized by enervation, exhaustion, hysteria, egotism, and inability to adjust or to act. Culture had degenerated, he said, and if criminals, prostitutes, anarchists, and lunatics were degenerates, so were the authors and artists of the era. Degeneration, and the controversy it aroused, served to define the fine de siècle. Its targets included Nietzsche, Oscar Wilde, Ibsen, Tolstoy, Richard Wagner, Zola, and Walt Whitman. The book was enormously influential. Nordau anticipated Freud in describing art as a product of neurosis, and he set a precedent for psychological and sociological critiques of literature. You may wish to talk back to Degeneration, as George Bernard Shaw did, but you will be entertained by its vitality. Holbrook Jackson, in The Eighteen Nineties, called the book "an example of the very liveliness of a period which was equally lively in making or marring itself." George L. Mosse's important introduction has been added to this Bison Books edition. His many works include The Nationalization of the Masses: Political Symbolism and Mass Movements in Germany from the Napoleonic Wars through the Third Reich.

Author: Sander L. Gilman
Publisher: Bison Books
Release: 1997
Summary: For people who are interested in resolving the question whether there is some truth behind the image of the "smart Jew", this book is NOT to be recommended. One would expect that Gilman sets out to test the hypothesis "Are Jews (on average) more intelligent than gentiles?" on the basis of the available evidence. And this is certainly a testable hypothesis. However, as the bookýs subtitle suggests, Gilmanýs review is not intended as such a test. On the contrary, from the beginning, Gilman starts out with the conviction that the idea of a Jewish superiority in intelligence is absurd and solely motivated by racist thinking. Correspondingly, he treats all the reviewed studies alike, as though there were no differences in their quality, be it conceptually or empirically. Instead of evaluating the particular merits and pitfalls of each single study one by one, Gilman presents us a hopeless mix of reported science and morals. He paints a picture of a scientific enterprise which is hopelessly lost in its preconceptions and which from the outset was bound to fail, because (as Gilman just knows) there ARE no differences to be found.
Several times, Gilman responds to scientific arguments with non-scientific, moralistic ones. For example, after introducing the work of Raphael Patai (The Jewish Mind, 1977) and Kevin MacDonald (A people that shall dwell alone. Judaism as a group evolutionary strategy, 1994), he accuses these authors of being tactless in using the term "selection" as likely process which has shaped Jewish IQ, because it reminds Gilman of the "selection" in the Nazi concentration camps during the holocaust. Here, the author clearly instrumentalizes the suffering of Nazi-victims, because the kind of genetic selection Patai and MacDonald propose is one acting through traditional Jewish practices in choosing a suitable partner for marriage, not one through between-group homicide. After presenting this (scientifically invalid) moral argument Gilman doesnýt make any attempt to present scientific arguments against the actual evidence for Jewish eugenic practice on intelligence as a heritable trait. To him the idea is obviously too absurd (and obscene at that) to deserve serious consideration, and empirical evidence doesnýt seem to count anything in Gilmans social constructivist approach.
For Gilman, even to hypothesize that there may be differences between groups such as Jews and gentiles amounts to no less than racism. To be sure, there have been several scientists with strong racist views, but certainly not all of them were of that kind. Here, Gilman is unable or unwilling to make any distinction between bad and better science. Any scientifically untested racist statement made by some historic scientist is scored equal to obviously more serious studies undertaken by (often Jewish) researchers. Gilman seems also unable or unwilling to distinghish between the study of group differences and group discrimination which strongly implies that he is not used to making a difference between the "is" and the "ought". This feature alone disqualifies him for handling the subject, because from his personally favored "ought" only one of two possible "isý" can follow.
In conclusion, Gilman fails to show that there isnýt any truth in the idea of Jewish superior intelligence beyond social construction. Therefore, only readers who share Gilmanýs preconceptions about the topic will enjoy reading this book, while all other readers will find this book hardly challenging. But then: what is the use of a book which doesnýt have the power to challenge oneýs mind, but only to please it?


Author: Mary Ann Caws
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
Release: 2000
Summary:

Author: Wendy Leeds-Hurwitz
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press
Release: 2004
Summary: To many of us who were anthropology students in Berkeley in the 60s, Jaime de Angulo was a mythic ancestor figure. He not only did excellent linguistic ethnography; he was also a leading candidate for the original Berkeley hippie. He lived a wild and erratic life, on the fringes of anthropology and literature; among other things, he was probably the main figure in the discovery of Big Sur and its development as a countercultural center. At the same time, he was helping to save Native American languages from extinction.
This book focuses on his linguistic research in the context of institutionalizing (a more accurate word than "professionalization" here) anthropology and linguistics in early 20th century America. De Angulo worked with or for the great figures in this movement: Franz Boas, A. L. Kroeber, Edward Sapir. All recognized de Angulo's genius and erratic ways. They provided him with money for research, and worked mightily to pry manuscripts out of him. In the end, he published an amazing amount (including novels and poetry) for someone who never had a regular academic appointment, and he left in manuscript a far vaster store. A tragic accident that took his son's life and almost took his as well interrupted de Angulo's career; he never quite rallied. In the end, he was part of a large number of gifted non-academics or para-academics ("amateurs" doesn't get it) who contributed mightily to anthropology.
Boas, Kroeber, Sapir and their group lived primarily to save what they could of Native American languages and cultures, before these disappeared. Many have tragically died out now; most Native Californian languages are extinct, and what we know of them is what those scholars recorded. Other languages survive, thanks partly to the ongoing efforts of scholars in the Boasian tradition. One of Boas' most important agendas was training Native American linguists and anthropologists, and this continues.
What animated all these diverse individuals was a tremendous concern for real people, and thus for the most important productions of the human spirit--language, literature, music, ritual, culture in all its wonderful and beautiful ways.
Today, anthropology has been taken over by a different breed. Far too much contemporary ethnography consists of narcissistic self-storying, arid elitist wordgames based loosely on misunderstood French philosophy, and denunciation of a whole range of vague, poorly defined evils ranging from "globalization" to "the touristic gaze." Concern for real people and their finest creations is not only rare--it is actually condemned in some quarters as "exoticism" or "salvage ethnography." A noble but sadly inadequate effort is devoted to saving languages--now dying out, worldwide, so fast that the world's 6800 languages may be reduced to a few hundred in the 22nd century.
Reading this book, with its portrayal of heroic efforts, may inspire a few souls to carry on the work.
The book is a solid scholarly work in its own right, but is marred by some repetition and dryness, and by perhaps an excessive tendency to avoid judgement. The goal of remaining nonjudgmental is desirable, given the above, but surely it is carried to extremes when we are given no real evaluation of the quality of de Angulo's work. Even his debate with Paul Radin over the phonemicization of Patwin is left unresolved here, though someone must have decided long ago who was right (if either was). Even so, de Angulo emerges powerfully from the book, a more-than-life-sized figure, totemic and mythic in an age of heroes that now seems as remote and Powerful (with a capital P) as the time of Coyote Himself.


Author: Norman Manea
Publisher: Grove Press
Release: 1993
Summary: The portion of this book which bears the title on the cover with the subtitle Notes To A Text By Fellini (pp. 33-61) arises from a point of view which the author shares with Paul Celan. The paragraph in which Fellini is allowed to explain himself is on page 44:

"The only female clown to achieve lasting fame is Miss Lulu. Gelsomina and Cabiria in my movies belong to the genus Auguste the Fool. They aren't women, they are sexless," says Fellini. "Charlot, an Auguste, is equally devoid of human gender, just a happy cat that cleans its fur and walks where it pleases." Laurel and Hardy, "two more of the same type, they even sleep together like innocent children, as if sex did not exist. Exactly that was what made the world laugh."

Norman Manea uses this to explain a nation's fascination "about the first couple of the land, forever locked in the presentation of the same routine: the first couple." (p. 44). Perhaps the comedy here is for those who constantly saw "Miss Lulena, who walks like a duck," (p. 45). I am not close enough to "The buffoon of a lamentable buffoon?" (p. 49) to find it funny, but whenever I am questioned about current events in a survey of political opinions, I would like to respond as in the final paragraph of the "On Clowns" essay:

"A circus routine that hasn't been announced." That was the answer given by the young poet Paul Celan before he went into exile in the West, forty years ago. (p. 61).

This book has no index, so the many references to figures in Romanian literature are most likely to be encountered by the reader by accident. Lucky me, I usually open the book to page 23, where section III of the first Essay in this book on Romania opens with the paragraph:

On receiving the literary prize of the city of Bremen, Paul Celan emphasized that he came from a little-known landscape, "a country inhabited by people and books." Celan was referring to the Bukovina of his adolescence, but these words could apply to Romania as a whole.

Norman Manea was born in Bukovina, Romania in 1936, and his concerns with life and literature in that nation reflect the fear that government efforts to control the nature of heroes in that context mainly stifle the expression of anything that would be great. I am particularly concerned with reading the political elements into this book because superpowers have a long history of thinking that disorder in smaller nations might easily be overcome by overwhelming support for an element that supports the global system. Norman Manea has a very human reaction to the objections to 80 percent of one of his novels raised in "The Censor's Report" reprinted on pages 73-83, which wanted to cut "(the chapter with the airplane and the description of the Chief of State--has no relevance to the problems explored in the book)." (p. 82).

As much as the United States would like to spread democracy in other parts of the world to promote the peace of happy producers and consumers, there are elements of power politics involved that echo this earlier situation:

"In mankind's outraged memory, nazism is characterized not merely by its racist ideology or by its militancy, but especially by the catastrophic consequences of Hitler's hysterical propaganda--arrogant brutality, devastating warfare, extermination camps. But this infamous human tragedy has to be seen in the context in which it arose. In a period of acute economic, political, moral, and intellectual crisis, national socialism offered a simplistic, violent, and `radical' solution. Nazism, a very dark ideology from the beginning, did not at first mean crematoria; it developed slowly, slyly, cruelly, to its sinister culmination." (pp. 102-103).

Most people don't picture the average superpower adopting similar measures as a logical result of economic suicide based on cutting taxes in a society in which government expenses are due to rise through the roof while technological growth slows to a crawl in the most logical financial collapse ever to surprise a complacent modern media, but we have become such a comic society that it would never occur to anyone to take our prospects seriously.

The final essay in the book, The History of an Interview, (pp. 125-178), has a similar theme. "The public uproar over my interview in `Familia' aggravated my far from idyllic relation with the power." (p. 153). "Was the irony (and often the sarcasm) that the system provoked just, as was asked in the famous interview, `an epiphany of the derisory'?" (p. 159).


Author: Jack Kerouac
Publisher: Grove Press
Release: 1989
Summary: I wouldn't say that the book is wholly without merit, but it left me with an eerie feeling, and a suspicion that it was an advertisement for a certain lifestyle, a cocktail, or god forbid khakis. It's a shameless embrace of impulsive living, embodied in the stylized way this book is written, and which was eventually Kerouac's undoing.

Is he fleecing the lowlifes he socializes with by writing down their stories? Is he glorifying, and capitalizing on, disfunction? It's difficult to answer those questions, but a more meaningful or entertaining book would preclude their asking.

Capote said of Jack Kerouac that he was "typing, not writing." That may have been unfair, but reading the Subterraneans, I felt I knew where he was coming from. That said, I kinda liked the ending. Gosh, I'm a sucker.



Author: Eugene Ionesco
Publisher: Grove Press
Release: 1982
Summary: These four one-act plays of bleak absurdity and startling originality place Ionesco alongside Beckett and Pinter as one of twentieth century theater's most enigmatic iconoclasts.
"The Bald Soprano" begins as a seemingly placid comedy on proper English manners, but then weird things happen -- irregular clock chimes, contradictions with no logical basis, non-sequiturs -- which build to a crescendo of chaos like a dissonant string quartet. Corrupting every convention of traditional drama, defying every expectation of the audience, it is exactly the "anti-play" its subtitle suggests.
In "The Lesson," an aging professor's excessive zeal for a particular subject, made incomprehensibly esoteric by his own obsessive study of it, is the downfall of many a hapless student.
"Jack" is the age-old story of a boy who disappoints his family by not wanting to marry the girl they have selected for him, but, like a surrealist painting, the proceedings are rendered grotesque by nonsensical lines and colors. As though to accentuate the banality of the underlying plot, the actors go to dramatic extremes as if they were acting out a "real" drama.
But I feel that the most engaging of the four plays is "The Chairs," in which two actors not only must play a nonagenarian couple hosting a roomful of people who have assembled for a lecture, but must pantomime the presence of the (invisible) guests. The bitterly ironic (and very funny) "lecture" given at the end affirms MacBeth's notion that life truly is a tale told by an idiot.
I think these plays are more about form than content, as Ionesco is experimenting with visual and verbal imagery and challenging the audience's sense of comfort with the theater, intending to evoke unusual and unpleasant emotions like awkwardness or embarrassment. To get the most out of reading the plays, it is best not to read them as literature but to visualize them being performed, paying close attention to every detail in the stage directions and the instructed mannerisms of the characters.


Author: Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic
Release: 1991
Summary: This book feels authentic and does not burden the reader with dogma or moral code. It is a simple look at a simple life practice, the art of zen. Suzuki is easy to understand without being overly simplistic. A good introduction to Zen.

Author: R. Crumb, Eric Reynolds, Robert Crumb
Publisher: Fantagraphics Books
Release: 2005
Summary: Volume 17 of the complete works of America's most infamous cartoonist!
After many Eisner and Harvey comics awards, the "Complete Crumb" series comes to a close (at least in its current format—we will continue to collect the entirety of Crumb's career in single-volume collections like "Hup" and "Mystic Funnies", beginning in 2005). This 17th volume collects a creatively fertile period for Crumb, having given up the editorial reins of his own legendary "Weirdo" magazine, allowing Crumb to get back to the proverbial drawing board. Included are Crumb's contributions to "Weirdo" from this period, as well as work from "Whole Earth Review, Zap Comix, Premiere" magazine, as well as many other rare gems. This volume, as with all volumes, includes a new introduction by Crumb as well as a new cover. "The Complete Crumb" series leaves no stone unturned, publishing everything from Crumb's most well-known comics to little-seen commercial art and rarely-if-ever seen treasures from private collections and the artist's archives.


Author: R. Crumb
Publisher: Fantagraphics Books
Release: 1995
Summary: Mr. Natural is a 1960s guru, "th' only knower of th' cosmic mysteries alive at this time." Calling him a "mystic madcap" gives the crass, less-than-compassionate charlatan the benefit of the doubt. He is not particularly wise or helpful; in fact, he's a lecherous, grumbling old geezer who gives advice such as "When you arise in the morning, you should do last night's dirty dishes . . . then you should sing a simple melody (of your own choice) . . . then you should call somebody up (not me) . . . then go to the store . . . buy some asparagus." True to the collection's name and R. Crumb's reputation, the stories are sometimes sexually graphic (especially in the scenes with Devil Girl) and a bit on the violent side. Still, there's an innocent, upbeat quality to this comic reflection of America's most notoriously freewheeling decade.

Author: Mark Thompson
Publisher: Fantagraphics Books
Release: 1995
Summary: This series is called the "Complete Crumb" for a reason. It is a collection of his complete works. As a result, some people who enjoy some of his work might not enjoy all of his work, but different strokes for different folks. Only the most diehard fan will find 100% of Crumb's works enjoyable. However, anyone buying this series is most likely already a diehard fan, and more casual readers can try out his regular format books quite cheaply to get a taste of his style or buy a more thematic collection to play it safe. As usual, Fantagraphics has published a collection living up to its extremely high standards of quality with excellent printing and reproduction values that will be treasured by fans of the comic arts.

Author: Gary Lachman
Publisher: Thunder's Mouth Press
Release: 2005
Summary: The occult was a crucial influence on the Renaissance, and it obsessed the popular thinkers of the day. But with the Age of Reason, occultism was sidelined; only charlatans found any use for it. Occult ideas did not disappear, however, but rather went underground. It developed into a fruitful source of inspiration for many important artists. Works of brilliance, sometimes even of genius, were produced under its influence. In A Dark Muse, Lachman discusses the Enlightenment obsession with occult politics, the Romantic explosion, the futuristic occultism of the fin de siècle, and the deep occult roots of the modernist movement. Some of the writers and thinkers featured in this hidden history of western thought and sensibility are Emanuel Swedenborg, Charles Baudelaire, J. K. Huysmans, August Strindberg, William Blake, Goethe, Madame Blavatsky, H. G. Wells, Edgar Allan Poe, and Malcolm Lowry.

Author: Geoffrey Cocks
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
Release: 1997
Summary:

Author: Lisa G. Aspinwall
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Release: 2002
Summary: ...collection of intriguing and diverse commentaries on historical and contemporary research on human strengths

Author: Robert A. Neimeyer
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Release: 2001
Summary:

Author: James E. Goggin, Eileen Brockman-Goggin, James, E Goggin, Eileen, Brockman Goggin
Publisher: Purdue University Press
Release: 2000
Summary: In this compelling book, the role of the continual trauma that the Third Reich had on individual psychoanalysts is used to assess the events of the transformation of the Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute into the Goring Institute. Through this investigation

Author: Helena Petrovna Blavatsky
Publisher: Theosophical University PR
Release: 1999
Summary: 1897. This rare third volume of the Secret Doctrine (virtually impossible to find) completes the papers left by H. P. B. It is a complete course on Occultism! Nothing is left out. Almost 100 chapters. Partial contents: One Key to all Sacred Books; The ABC of Magic; Chaldean Oracles; The Book of Hermes; Three Ways Open to the Adept; Names are Symbols; Characters of the Bible; The Book of Enoch; Hermetic and Kabalistic Doctrines; Numbers and Magic; Occult Weapons; The Duty of the True Occultist; Two Eternal Principles; St. Paul the real founder of Christianity; Apollonius no Fiction; Biographies of Initiates; Kabalistic Readings of Gospels; Magic in Antioch; The Septenary Sephira; Seven Keys to all Allegories; The Mystery of the Sun; Magical Statutes; Masonry and Jesuits; Mysteries and Masonry; Egyptian Initiation; Root of Races; Celestial Wheels; Christian Star Worship; Defense of Astrology; The Seven Rays; Secret Books; Tibetan Prophecies; Swedenborg; Occult Secrecy; and much more! Blavatsky was an occult master. If you are a serious mystical student, you'll need this rare and illuminating book.

Author: Emanuel Swedenborg
Publisher: North Atlantic Books
Release: 2003
Summary: Best known for his focus on the intuitive force within, Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772) also anticipated major modern discoveries in mineralogy, psychology, and anatomy. In this succinct and readable collection, Stanley expertly brings the most significant writings from Swedenborg's oeuvre together, showing readers a man who created a "hieroglyphic" language, reimagined the Genesis story, influenced Blake, Balzac, Strindberg, and Yeats, and authored a number of anonymous works that put the Swedish clergy of his day on high alert. This is the fourth title in the Western Esoteric Masters series from North Atlantic Books.

Author: Jon Klimo
Publisher: North Atlantic Books
Release: 1998
Summary: This audiocassette is a perfect complement to Jon Klimo's book "Channeling," (upon which it is based), but it can stand alone as well. It is professionally produced and narrated by Stanley Ralph Ross. The exploration of channeling features comments by 7 well-known spirit guides (being channeled), including Seth (Jane Roberts), Lazaris (Jach Pursel), Enid (Iris Belhayes), Dr. Peebles (W. Rainen), Soli (neville Rowe), Master Adolfo (Carol Simpson), and Abrham (Tom Massari). There is also a guided meditation created especially for this tape by Lazaris designed to open the listener to the experience of channeling. A 7-step induction technique is included as well, conducted by Enid. All in all, one has a superb opportunity here to experience a variety of channeled entities and to explore the subject in a serious, non-"airy-fairy" manner. It's a shame this tape is OOP as the channeling phenomenon has grown widely since the tape (and Klimo's fine book) were released. This tape and fine booklet would ease the mind of anyone who might confuse channeling with "mediumship." The spirit guides are loving and humorous and the entire experience is uplifting as well as informative. Highly recommended!

Author: Christopher Simpson
Publisher: Grove Pr
Release: 1988
Summary: Christopher Simpson's Blowback is a scrupulously researched work about how the United States government, contrary to its stated policies, deliberately recruited a veritable army of former Nazis and collaborators in the years immediately after World War II. Acting principally through the CIA, these ex-Nazis and sympathizers were then used in our developing cold war against the former USSR, mostly without success, but always behind a veil of secrecy. And that's the theme of his work: in the name of anti-communism, any new-found allies were OK, and whatever war crimes they had engaged in prior to swearing allegiance to us was ignored or erased.

Simpson carefully documents how US foreign policy personnel, who had clear knowledge that their new spy recruits had committed war crimes or crimes against humanity, ignored or hid their past, supposedly because these former Nazis had intelligence value.

There are many lessons worth learning from this valuable book: how easy and how routine it was for the OSS and its successors to subvert the laws and policies of the United States through deception. Whenever it was time to seek immigrant status for an ex-Nazi whose past would have disqualified him, the OSS or its successors simply doctored the files to delete the offending material. As the participants in these charades candidly acknowledge in his work, they thought they were acting in the country's best interests, and they weren't going to let mere nuisances like US laws stand in their way. All this took place at the very dawn of the Cold War, before the CIA had even been formally established. It's not a stretch to argue that the CIA's continuing mentality that it isn't bound by US law because it knows what's best for the country was born and nurtured by this large-scale deception.

As part of the CIA's anti-communist campaign, it also tried repeatedly to instigate armed insurrections against various communist states in the 1940s and 1950s, none of which were successful. It also funded and supported various assassination campaigns. Again we see a pattern of behavior that the CIA repeated again and again: it funded these operations "off the books," meaning Congress was largely kept in the dark about what the CIA was up to, and the CIA arrogated to itself the right to decide whether these proxy wars and assassination campaigns were proper US policies. And as Simpson notes, by using quislings and collaborators for these campaigns, people known in their communities and nations for their terrible deeds in World War II, the US unwittingly played into Soviet propaganda that the US was really no different than the Nazis themselves.

In addition, as Simpson make very clear, much of what these former Nazis fed the OSS and CIA as information on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe turned out to be baseless, and in many cases their spy networks turned out to have been deeply compromised by the USSR. The spy networks consistently overestimated the actual military threat posed by the USSR. But as Simpson points out, these CIA paid assets had ever incentive to overstate the danger. They were on the payroll, and as long as the Soviet menace appeared imminent, they would remain so. But start to say that there was no threat and the gravy train might come to an abrupt halt. Iraqi weapons of mass destruction, anyone?

Finally, because they fed the CIA, which admittedly had few Company assets on the ground in Eastern Europe after the war, a steadily hawkish line about the USSR and its intentions, they helped to contribute to the shrill political hysteria that emerged. I don't want to be misunderstood: the Soviet Union was evil, its methods vile and I don't weep any tears for its demise. But in our fear and in our ignorance, we made serious policy errors in those post-war years, and in doing so, we relied to a significant degree on people we should have known better than to trust: a group of ex-Nazis and collaborators who we knew were guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity. Further, as I have suggested here, we helped inculcate our national security apparatus with a view that the ends always justified the means, and that as intelligence gatekeepers, the CIA was not bound by US law or public policy, but merely by its own secret determination of what was in the country's best interests.


Author: Edward Bulwer-Lytton
Publisher: Broadview Press
Release: 2002
Summary: As I drew near and nearer to the light, the chasm became wider, and at last I saw, to my unspeakable amaze, a broad level road at the bottom of the abyss, illumined as far as the eye could reach by what seemed artificial gas lamps placed at regular intervals, as in the thoroughfare of a great city; and I heard confusedly at a distance a hum as of human voices . . .
Edward Bulwer-Lytton's The Coming Race was one of the most remarkable and most influential books published in the 1870s. The protagonist, a wealthy American wanderer, accompanies an engineer into the recesses of a mine, and discovers the vast caverns of a well-lit, civilized land in which dwell the Vril-ya. Placid vegetarians and mystics, the Vril-ya are privy to the powerful force of Vril -- a mysterious source of energy that may be used to illuminate, or to destroy. The Vril-ya have built a world without fame and without envy, without poverty and without many of the other extremes that characterize human society. The women are taller and grander than the men, and control everything related to the reproduction of the race. There is little need to work -- and much of what does need to be done is for a novel reason consigned to children.
As the Vril-ya have evolved a society of calm and of contentment, so they have evolved physically. But as it turns out, they are destined one day to emerge from the earth and to destroy human civilization.
Bulwer-Lytton's novel is fascinating for the ideas it expresses about evolution, about gender, and about the ambitions of human society. But it is also an extraordinarily entertaining science fiction novel. Sir Edward Bulwer-Lytton, one of the great figures of late Victorian literature, may have been overvalued in his time -- but his extraordinarily engaging and readable work is certainly greatly undervalued today. As Brian Aldiss notes in his introduction to this new edition, this utopian science fiction novel first published in 1871 still retains tremendous interest.


Author: Lorne L. Dawson
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing, Incorporated
Release: 2003
Summary: What is a cult? Why do they emerge? Who joins them? And why do tragedies such as Waco and Jonestown occur? This Reader brings together the voices of historians, sociologists, and psychologists of religion to address these key questions about new religious movements.The volume opens with an introductory essay by the editor, and each section is prefaced by a brief essay outlining the issues at stake, the state of current discussion, and the nature, value, and relevance of the selected readings. The readings themselves are broad-ranging and include coverage of topical questions, such as the 'brainwashing' controversy, sexual deviance and gender issues, and cults in cyberspace.This collection enables readers to gain a clear understanding of the phenomenon of new religious movements in modern culture and to replace prejudice and speculation with reliable insights into the nature of cult activity.